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Monday, November 9
 

09:00

UNESCO Chair, Unitwin (MIL) - “Should education 3.0 and children be part of Internet governance?”

Children and young people are increasingly reliant on the Internet for their everyday lives. They communicate, share and collaborate online. They use it to learn and play. They recognise its importance for their adult working lives. Considering their increasing access, agency and autonomy in using content and services, their protection as a vulnerable group needs to be coupled with their education as emerging citizens to ensure they develop a healthy and positive relationship regarding the Internet. Their general well-being, participation in society, and prospects of employment greatly depend on Media and Information Literacy (MIL) as the new set of basic skills for the 21st century, where computational thinking interfaces with the rich and diverse ‘cultures of information’ (news, data, documents, codes, etc.).

 

This pre-event examines education and its digital transition, mindful of the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations. It opens a series of perspectives and alerts on certain trends to ensure that the future of education is part of the global debate on Internet Governance. It posits that Internet Governance (IG) offers a new form of legitimacy for children and young people to go beyond their current “protected” status. Active participation in Internet Governance can empower them to become actors in policy deliberations. This can be achieved by developing a ‘frontier’ field integrating the existing Internet studies with Media and Information Literacy (MIL), redefined to comprise Internet Governance principles, protocols and processes. This new field can be integrated in the school curriculum as a key educational discipline. Such a digital transition from education 2.0 (where ICTs are support tools) to education 3.0 (where MIL and IG are the new basics) can provide children with competences for cooperation, creativity and social innovation. It can also nurture their human rights and understanding of shared values, which, in turn, will help to build more inclusive societies.

 

This pre-event also considers the risks of inaction in the transition to education 3.0. It draws attention to a crucial element for effective change: the need to raise awareness and to support teachers, students and public authorities alike to embrace the notion of education 3.0, to consider the tools and resources needed (e-learning, data analytics, MOOCS, etc.), and to engage in the phased adjustments needed at all levels of its governance. Incremental, scalable, step-by-step change is key to success in the education sector that has already experienced many ‘computer-in-the-school’ plans with mixed results. Education 3.0, based on “co-design” as collaborative problem-solving, buttressed on human rights and shared values, provides a comprehensive vision that can engage all actors at their level of interaction.

 

Discussions will be based on the paper on “Children and young people’s sustainable digital development: Education 3.0 and Internet Governance as a new global alliance for dynamic learning, greater employability and general well-being”, prepared by Divina Frau-Meigs and Lee Hibbard , for the Global Commission on Internet Governance.  


Session Organizers
LH

Lee Hibbard

Council of Europe



Monday November 9, 2015 09:00 - 10:00
Workshop Room 7

09:00

Italian Chamber of Deputies - "Internet Bill of Rights"

PROGRAM November 9, 2015
Preliminary event @ #igf2015 Internet Governance
Forum, Joao Pessoa
Poeta Ronaldo Cunha Lima Conference Center - Room 6


WORKSHOP 9 am - 1 pm


BUILDING INTERNET BILLS OF RIGHTS: challenges and
opportunities


9AM-9:15AM - Welcome and introduction to the
debate
(with a message from the president of the Italian
Chamber of Deputies, Laura Boldrini)


9:15AM-11AM - From national to international
experiences


Opening presentation:


"Why a Declaration of Internet Rights? Italy and
beyond"
Prof. Stefano Rodotà, Italian Parliament's
Committee of study (15 min)


Discussants (around 10
minutes):




Nnenna Nwakanma (Web
Foundation)
Marietje Schaak (EU
Parliament)
Urs Gasser (Berkman Center)
Ronaldo Lemos (ITS)


moderation: Carlos Affonso Souza (ITS, Rio de
Janeiro State University)


11AM-11:20AM Coffee break


11:20 - 1PM - Challenges
ahead


moderation: Anna Masera (journalist, spokesperson
for the Italian Parliament)


Freedom of Expression and Right to be Forgotten
:: Frank La Rue (former UN Rapporteur)




The Right to a Digital Education :: Juan Carlos
De Martin (Nexa Center for Internet & Society, Politecnico di Torino, member
of the Italian Parliament's Committe of study)


Internet Governance :: Fadi Chehade (ICANN)
TBC


Internet Governance and multi-stakeholderism ::
Stefano Trumpy (ISOC, member of the Italian Parliament's Committe of
study)


Privacy and Identification :: Paolo Coppola
(Italian mp, member of the Italian Parliament's Committe of
study)


Fundamental Rights and Terrorism in the Age of
the Internet :: Giovanna de Minico (University of Naples Federico II,
Interdepartmental Centre Ermes, member of the Italian Parliament's Committe of
study)


Brazil´s Data Protection Draft Bill of Law ::
Danilo Doneda (Brazilian Ministry´s of Justice consultant)


This is an open event, but registration to attend
the IGF is requested. All attendants are welcome to contribute to the debate by
commenting on the presentations and bringing their own perspective on how the
national and regional experiences concerning Internet Bill of Rights can foster
a global debate about internet freedom and the respect for human rights
online.






EVENING CEREMONY  7:15
pm - 10 pm



Location: Hotel Tambau




18h30 - Welcome Reception (with drinks and
snacks)


19h15 - Welcome address: Virgílio Almeida
(CGI), Anna Masera (Italian parliament), Carlos Affonso
(ITS)




19h30 - Multistakeholderism experiences



=> Moderation: Virgílio Almeida (CGI)



Juan Carlos de Martin, NEXA Politecnico de Torino
(Italian Declaration)


Carlos Afonso, CGI
(NETMundial)


Veridiana Alimonti, CGI (CGI´s 10 Principles for
the Governance and Use of the Internet)


Ronaldo Lemos, ITS (Marco
Civil)


           
20h30 - Towards a Collaborative and Democratic
Internet Governance


=> Moderation: Flávio Wagner (20 min.
presentations)


Prof. Stefano Rodotà (Italian Parliament's
Committee of study),


Markus Kummer, former Executive Coordinator of
the IGF


Urs Gasser, Berkman Center for Internet and
Society

Session Organizers
avatar for Anna Masera

Anna Masera

Head of Press Office and Communications, Camera dei deputati
Internet rights! | | Our preliminary event on November 9th is organized by the Italian Parliamentary Committee together with the Institute of Technology and Society of Rio de Janeiro: a workshop in room 6 in the morning and a big event at the Tambau Hotel in the evening. | | BUILDING INTERNET BILLS OF RIGHTS: challenges and opportunities | 09:00 am - 09:15 am - Welcome and introduction to the debate | (with a message from the President of... Read More →


Monday November 9, 2015 09:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 6

09:00

09:00

NETMundial Initiative

This open meeting of the NETmundial Initiative (“Initiative”) inaugural Coordination Council (“Council”) aims to further the discussion about the activities of the Initiative, whose mission is to provide a platform that helps catalyze practical cooperation between all stakeholders in order to address Internet issues and advance the implementation of the NETmundial Principles and Roadmap.

The session will bring together members of the Council to discuss challenges, opportunities, and potential areas of collaboration with the broader IGF community. These efforts are aimed at strengthening the multistakeholder model by providing stakeholders with practical tools that increase information and knowledge-sharing.

Agenda: http://ow.ly/UkYgh    


Session Organizers
avatar for Ergys Ramaj

Ergys Ramaj

Director of Collaborations, ICANN



Monday November 9, 2015 09:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 2

09:00

GIGANet (Global Internet Governance Academic Network)

The Global Internet Governance Academic Network (GigaNet) is presenting its 10th Annual Symposium on 09 November 2015 in the city of João Pessoa, Brazil. The symposium will take place in the Convention Center Poeta Ronaldo Cunha Lima and will once more bring together a large number of Internet governance researchers from several parts of the world discussing some of the most current topics of the field like privacy, human rights, critical infrastructure, multistakeholder systems, regional approaches and more.

GigaNet is inviting all interested individuals to participate in this event which will initiate its first panel at 9h in the morning followed by a truely diversified set of subsequent sessions. Although GigaNet was established as an academic organization it is important to emphasize that people from all sectors of society and independently of their fields of activities are welcome to contribute to the discussions.

The final session in the late afternoon is followed by an easygoing additional event to celebrate the 10th birthday of GigaNet's Annual Symposium. We hope to see you there!

 

9:00 WELCOME

  • Marianne Franklin, Chair of Steering Committee
  • Daniel Oppermann, Chair of Program Committee


9:15-10:45 - MULTISTAKEHOLDER GOVERNANCE APPROACH

The multistakeholder governance approach is one of if not the most important theoretical approach to Internet governance. For many years it has been handled as the basis for setting up inclusive structures on a local, regional and global scale. Over the past years a growing number of researchers has started to analyze and also to question this approach. Some of these researchers will present their ideas and conclusions during this session which will provide us with the necessary theoretical framework for the subsequent debates of the day. The paper presented are:

  • Madeline Carr. Power Plays in Multi-stakeholder Internet Governance. 
  • Roxana Radu and Nicolo Zingales. In search of the holy grail: meaningful multistakeholder governance in internet policy-making. 
  • Stefania Milan and Arne Hintz. In multistakeholderism we trust?
  • Moderator: Aline Contti Castro
  • Discussant: Mishi Choudhary


10:45-11:00 BREAK


11:00-12:30 WSIS+10 & REGIONAL FOCUS

The World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) is considered to be a starting point for many Internet governance debates and also for the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) itself. The results of the WSIS meetings in 2003 and 2005 comprise among other documents the first comprehensive definition of Internet governance developed by the then active Working Group on Internet Governance (WGIG). The WSIS process was of great importance for the global dissemination of Internet governance debates. What happened to the WSIS process over the past 10 years? Which path did the actors involved back then took over the last years and how does this affect today's Internet policy development processes on a global and a regional level? These and other related questions we want to discuss at a round table based on the following papers:

  • Julia Pohle. Internet governance within WSIS+10: Deliberate exclusion or strategic neglect? 
  • Rikke Frank Jorgensen and Meryem Marzouki. Internet Governance and the Reshaping of Global Human Rights Legacy at WSIS+10. 
  • Carolina Aguerre and Hernan Galperin. Internet Policy Formation in Latin America: Understanding the Links between National, Regional, and Global Dynamics.
  • Courtney Radsch. The changing landscape of Internet governance in the Arab region.
  • Moderator: Marianne Franklin

 

12:30-14:00 LUNCH BREAK

 

14:00-15:30 TRUST & ETHICS

While the fast and dynamic character of global Internet development does often not allow us to identify and follow all changes and processes happening in the plurality of locations in this world there are always certain key moments which call global attention and might as a consequence change perceptions and influence decision-making processes of several global, regional and local actors. One of these key moments in the history of the Internet are the so called Snowden revelations which since 2013 function as a game-changer for many actors involved in and also beyond the Internet governance environment. Today's discussions surrounding these developments lead us to a series of much broader questions related also to a general set of fundamental values like freedom, responsibility and sustainability. Together with Jeanette Hofmann and Rolf H. Weber we want to discuss in this session the role of values and the importance of trust and distrust in the global Internet governance environment. The papers presented are:

  • Rolf H. Weber. Ethics as New Topic in the Internet Governance Ecosystem. 
  • Jeanette Hofmann. Constellations of trust and distrust in Internet governance.
  • Samantha Bradshaw: Trust and Internet governance.
  • Moderator: Daniel Oppermann
  • Discussant: Xianhong Hu

 

15:30-15:45 BREAK


15:45-17:15 INFRASTRUCTURE & CRITICAL INTERNET RESOURCES

Naturally, Internet governance is also to an extensive degree focused on questions of technical infrastructure and critical Internet resources. One crucial question is the ambivalent relation between actors representing traditional approaches like national souvereignty and the nonambiguous transboundery character of computer networks like the Internet. The conflicts that arise in this context embrace different aspects like top level domains (TLDs) or financial transactions and are often related to questions of technical, financial or even national security. These and other questions including critical infrastructure and the actors involved in its development and maintenance we want to elaborate together with the authors of the following papers:

  • Brenden Kuerbis, Milton Mueller and Rio Maulana. Beyond technical solutions: Understanding the role of governance structures in Internet routing security. 
  • Milton Mueller and Farzaneh Badiei. Sovereignty and Property Rights: Conceptualizing the Relationship between ICANN, ccTLDs and National Governments. 
  • Diego Vicentin. Developing standards, shaping the network: ethnographic notes on the IEEE 802 LAN/MAN Standards Committee.
  • Moderator: Olga Cavalli

 

17:15-18:00 FINAL SESSION

- Summing up
- Updates and Announcements
- Stocktaking and Looking Forward

  • Moderator: Marianne Franklin 
  • Rapporteur: Julia Pohle

 

The symposium will be followed up by GigaNet Anniversary Reception in the Green Area (área verde) of the Hotel Tropical Tambaú starting at 19h30.


Session Organizers
avatar for Daniel Oppermann

Daniel Oppermann

Researcher, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), GigaNet


Monday November 9, 2015 09:00 - 18:00
Workshop Room 4
  • Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BALm4Dv5Fik and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDYqG5-JkEg

09:00

ISOC - "Collaborative Leadership Exchange on Internet Governance for Sustainable Development"
Session Organizers
avatar for Raquel Gatto

Raquel Gatto

Regional Policy Advisor, Internet Society


Monday November 9, 2015 09:00 - 18:00
Workshop Room 1
  • Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FhYrQw9w9OY and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekL264n23iY

09:00

Stanford Deliberative Poll
The Pilot Deliberative Poll on Internet Access will take place from 2-6PM. By invitation only.
The morning is a closed session.

Session Organizers
KG

Kathleen Giles

CDD Manager, Stanford University


Monday November 9, 2015 09:00 - 18:00
Workshop Room 3

10:00

10:30

Citizen Lab - "Mapping Internet Governance and Information Controls: Lessons Learned from Southeast Asia"
This session will discuss the preliminary findings from the Citizen Lab's research project on mapping Internet governance and information controls in Thailand, the Philippines, and Myanmar (Burma). The project's partners include Foundation for Media Alternatives (The Philippines) and Chulalongkorn University (Thailand), and is sponsored by Hivos.

Session Organizers
A

Amit

Citizen Lab


Monday November 9, 2015 10:30 - 12:00
Workshop Room 5

10:30

ICANN Accountability and Global Governance Discourse

In light of the U.S. government’s anticipated IANA functions’ stewardship transition, ICANN has seen the broadest global participation in its history: the Internet community is not only developing a technical plan for the future of the IANA functions, but is also taking this opportunity to determine accountability enhancements that will empower the Internet community and strengthen multistakeholder policymaking. This panel discussion will inform attendees of the latest developments in these processes and discuss influences on global governance discourse. 

 

Panelists:

  • Steve Crocker, ICANN Chairman of the Board (Opening Remarks)
  • Theresa Swinehart, ICANN Senior Advisor to the President (Moderator)
  • Thomas Schneider, Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC) Chair
  • Leon Sanchez, CCWG-Accountability co-Chair
  • Lise Fuhr, CWG co-Chair
  • Manal Ismail, ICG member 
  • Gonzalo Navarro, former ICANN Board Director 

Session Organizers
avatar for Baher Esmat

Baher Esmat

Vice President, Global Stakeholder Engagement, Middle East, ICANN
Baher Esmat is a leading voice on Internet policy and regulatory issues in the Middle East. In his role as ICANN Regional Vice President, he is part of the advance guard of Internet proponents for a free, open and affordable Internet within the Arab world. | A keen facilitator of collaboration and dialogue between ICANN and the broader Internet community, Baher promotes and supports domain name system operations initiatives and capacity-building... Read More →


Monday November 9, 2015 10:30 - 12:00
Workshop Room 7

11:00

11:00

Orientation Session
Brief Description/Objective: Orientation sessions are intended for both newcomers to the IGF and those that are already involved but would need to get a more holistic view of Internet governance. It gathers experts, fellows, decision-makers and practitioners to engage meaningfully by, actors and topics related to the Internet governance. The session will be interactive, educative, inclusive, at the same time creative and amusing, it will be open but also guided in order to be effective. Agenda: Main focus: Diplomacy, process, actors; Navigation the IGF, Involvement beyond 2015 Time: 90 mins Set up: - Panel & round-table discussion groups Moderator: Fatima Cambronero   I. (30mins) Diplomacy, process and actors: WSIS process, IGF, other fora (NetMundial, ICANN, ITU, ONU GA); actors/stakeholders and their main positions • A brief of the WSIS process • Role and mandate of the IGF and MAG • Multistakeholder model and roles Q&A and discussion II. (30mins) Introduction: Navigating the IGF • Navigating IGF: providing practical hints and inputs on how to navigate the IGF during the meeting; (Main sessions, workshops, remote participation, corridors, etc.) • How to choose the workshops (color codes) Q&A and discussion III. (30mins) Involvement beyond 2015 • National & regional IGF’s • Inclusiveness: Involving the persons with disabilities, youth and indigenous groups • Capacity building mechanisms and programmes • Continued Engagement - e-participation, mailing list Q&A and discussion Policy Questions: What is the IGF? (space for discussions or decisions). What are the origins of the IGF? Who are the stakeholders involved? How to get involved in the process? How to make contributions during the discussions at the IGF? Is the first time participating that you are participating in the IGF? How to take advantage of the meeting? What do you expect to attend the IGF? The multistakeholder model and the roles of each stakeholder. Multistakeholder Model Vs. Multilateral Model? Perspective of each stakeholder. How to articulate the spaces dedicated to the Internet governance at national and regional level in the global IGF? What other spaces/initiatives related to Internet governance exists and how can I participate? Mechanisms and programs for capacity building in IG issues. Is it within the mandate of the IGF the capacity building activities? What is the role of academia in the Internet governance arena? Continued involvement with the IGF: e-participation, mailing lists, monitoring of Internet governance issues. How can the stakeholder that I represent achieve influence others stakeholders in the IGF debate? Why in the IGF no decisions are made? What would be the benefit of participating in the IGF if I cannot achieve any outcome as representative of my stakeholder? What is the difference in the participation of the representatives of the different stakeholder in spaces such as ICANN / IETF / ITU and the IGF? In my country there is not a national Internet governance forum. As a representative of my stakeholder, what I have to do to organize one? Should I ask permission/authorization to some organization? What procedures should I follow? In my country there is a national Internet governance forum but the stakeholder that I represent have very low representation. How do I get involved? Having participated in this year's IGF, and as a stakeholder representative, how do to stay involved with Internet governance issues? As a stakeholder representative, how do I contribute to making policy decisions that affect Internet when I return to my local community? Moderators: Fatima Cambronero Panelists: Andres Piazza, Olivier Crépin-Leblond, Carolina Aguerre, Pedro Ferraz da Silva, Daniel Fink, Israel Rosas, Sebastian Bellagamba, Jovan Kurbalija, Brian Gutterman, Vladimir Radunovic, Valeria Betancourt, Deidree Williams, Raul Echeberria. Remote moderator/Plan for online interaction: Deidree Williams.

Monday November 9, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room_10

13:00

14:00

Nuecla Services Limited
Monday November 9, 2015 14:00 - 15:00
Workshop Room 9

14:00

14:00

14:00

14:00

Ranking Digital Rights/ Internews - “Corporate Accountability for Digital Rights: Building a Global Research and Advocacy Network”

UPDATE: The UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression, David Kaye, will deliver opening remarks.

It is our pleasure to invite all IGF participants to join an advocacy and research brainstorming meeting on the issue of corporate accountability for digital rights. Jointly hosted by Ranking Digital Rights and Internews on the eve of the Internet Governance Forum, this meeting will gather a diverse group of activists and researchers working at the intersection of Internet governance, business and human rights. The goal is to brainstorm concrete ideas for how civil society advocates and academic researchers can use the Corporate Accountability Indexdata and indicators for their own work at the national, regional, and international levels.  

The event begins with a presentation of the results of the inaugural Ranking Digital Rights Corporate Accountability Index, which evaluates 16 telecommunication and Internet companies headquartered around the world on 31 indicators examining policies and disclosures affecting users’ freedom of expression and privacy. The next two segments of the meeting will focus on brainstorming concrete ideas for advocacy and research projects using the Index’s findings. We invite you to peruse the results on the interactive website, download the report (and even the raw data) and view the webcast of our launch event in advance of the IGF.

Agenda:

2-3pm – Presentation of the Ranking Digital Rights Corporate Accountability Index and discussion of findings of greatest interest to global civil society and international researchers

Opening Remarks: David Kaye, UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression

Rebecca MacKinnon, presenter

Discussants: 

  • Donny BU, ICT Watch, Indonesia
  • Mohamed Najem, Social Media Exchange, Lebanon

3:15-4:30pm – Advocacy brainstorm. Practical discussion about ideas for using the RDR index data for advocacy at the national, regional, and global level.

Allon Bar, Moderator

Discussants:

  • Peter Micek, Access Now
  • Nighat Dad, Digital Rights Foundation, Pakistan

4:45-6pm – Research brainstorm – Practical discussion about research questions and possible ideas for research projects using RDR’s findings as a starting point.

Nathalie Marechal, moderator

Discussants:

  • David Kaye, UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression
  • Eduardo Bertoni, CELE

While the event is open to all IGF participants, we would appreciate if people canRSVP via this link to let us know you are coming and what you are interested in talking about.


Session Organizers
avatar for Rebecca MacKinnon

Rebecca MacKinnon

Director, Ranking Digital Rights, New America Foundation
Ranking Digital Rights


Monday November 9, 2015 14:00 - 18:00
Workshop Room 8

15:00

FGV DIREITO RIO/ Council of Europe/ Government of Brazil/ German Institute for International and Security Affairs - "Privacy in the Digital Age"
Privacy under mass surveillance: a multi-stakeholder international challenge

The event will gather experts from stakeholder groups, policy makers and representatives of international organizations to assess the challenges posed to the right to privacy in a context of mass surveillance. A comparative study, developed by CTS/FGV and SWP, about the Brazilian and German legal approaches to data retention and intelligence activities will be presented at the occasion to raise questions for debate. 

Organizers: Center for Technology and Society of the Rio de Janeiro Law School of the Getulio Vargas Foundation (CTS/FGV), German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP) and Council of Europe (CoE).

Opening Marilia Maciel (CTS FGV), Marcel Dickow (SWP), Lee Hibbard (CoE)  

15:10-15:45 | Privacy and Surveillance in the Digital Age: a comparative study of the Brazilian and German legal frameworks

Marilia Maciel (CTS FGV),
Marcel Dickow (SWP),
Anja Dahlmann (SWP),
Jamila Venturini (CTS FGV)
Comments: Brazilian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (TBC) and German Federal Foreign Office (TBC)  

15:45-16:45 | New challenges for data protection in the era of Big Data: surveillance, extraterritoriality and international cooperation
Keynote speaker: Stefano Rodotá, Former President of the Italian Data Protection Authority
Luis de Salvador, Spanish Data Protection Authority
Danilo Doneda, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro
Moderator: Luca Belli (CTS FGV)  

16:45-18:00| The right to Privacy in the context of mass surveillance: challenges and perspectives for the future
Keynote speaker: Joe Cannataci, UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Privacy
Anna Biselli, Netzpolitik
Danny O’Brien, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Harry Halpin, W3C & Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, MIT
Moderator: Lee Hibbard, CoE

Session Organizers
avatar for Luca Belli

Luca Belli

Researcher, Center for Technology and Society at FGV
Luca Belli, PhD, is Senior Researcher at the Center for Technology and Society (CTS) of Fundação Getulio Vargas Law School, Rio de Janeiro, where he leads the 'Internet Governance @ FGV' project. Luca is also associated researcher at the Centre de Droit Public Comparé of Paris 2 University. Before joining CTS, Luca worked for the Council of Europe Internet Governance Unit; served as a Network Neutrality Expert for the Council... Read More →


Monday November 9, 2015 15:00 - 18:00
Workshop Room 9

15:30

BPF on Regulation and mitigation of unsolicited communications - "Technical proficiency training for Africa: organisation, coordination, funding"

An expected major recommendation of the Best Practice Forum (BPF) on the regulation and mitigation of unsolicited communications is to provide technical training in developing nations at basic security level for ISPs, telcos and hosting organisations’ network and abuse administrators in order to prevent and mitigate the risks associated with unsolicited communications sent over the internet. This session brings together relevant stakeholders. On the one hand the BPF’s expected recommendations are presented, on the other potential solutions to realise training are discussed.

 

In the BPF we have established that in Africa (and other developing regions) there is a clearly felt need for action against all sorts of unsolicited communications and for the implementation of standards and best practices. Operators in developed nations dread the rising numbers targeting their networks. Years of experience and successful measures are available. Specific training and trainers are offered. The Global Forum on Cyber Expertise (GFCE) is an organisation that may facilitate a process such as that presented here and is looking for initiatives to bring under its organisation. The challenge is in finding funding and coordination, general support and identifying the right people to train.

 

The BPF “unsolicited communications” organises this Day Zero matchmaking event to bring together directly involved stakeholders and discuss the possibility of training, organisation, coordination and funding. This session invites representatives from e.g. governments, IGO’s, industry and expert groups to participate. The session aims for a decision to continue this topic. It is a direct result of the BPF process and a direct input for the BPF session on Tuesday. Organising this training is seen as a potential quick win where the outcome of the 2015 BPF process is concerned as well as a win-win factor for developing and developed nations alike.


Session Organizers
avatar for Wout de Natris

Wout de Natris

Consultant/owner, De Natris Consult
Apart from organising Workshop #153 'Let's break down silos in cyber security and cyber crime' on behalf of SIDN and NLIGF, you can talk to me about cyber security and SMEs, national and international cooperation and opportunities to build bridges between different silos. I'm interested to hear your views and/or discuss how I can aid you in achieving your goals in establishing cyber security and better prevent cyber crime.


Monday November 9, 2015 15:30 - 18:00
Workshop Room 6

16:30

 
Tuesday, November 10
 

08:10

ICC BASIS Business Briefing
 *This meeting is open to Business attendees only

Tuesday November 10, 2015 08:10 - 08:50
Workshop Room_10

09:00

BPF Developing meaningful multistakeholder participation mechanisms

Best Practice Forum: Developing meaningful multistakeholder participation mechanisms

Tuesday, November 10 • 09:00 - 10:30 - Workshop Room 6

The BPF-Multi has been working for two years to create a document that explores some of the issues involved in enabling multistakeholder participation.  At IGF 2014 the focus was on definitions and exploration of some of the theory behind multistakeholder models.  This year, the group documented a number of existing practices and attempted to extract some practices that can be considered when working within a multistakeholder model.

The group developed a document that has been undergoing public edit for the last half year that is being considered by the group as an output document that can be used as an input by other groups involved in developing, or evolving, their own multstakeholder processes. The meeting will consider the document and consider the next steps for the document.

0. Review and revise Agenda

1. Brief update on the status of the working document

2. Discussion of some notable issues encountered during the course of the past year:

  • Nature of consensus in multistakeholder organization and decision making

  • The bad actor problem

  • The relationship of multistakeholder models to democracy

  • Best practices and examples of multistakeholder mechanisms submitted to the process

  • Other issues (interactive discussion)

3. Disposition of the document: Should it be forwarded to the Chair of IGF2015 for inclusion as output of the meeting?

4. Future of the multistakeholder mechanism work

5. Any other issues.



Session Organizers
avatar for Avri Doria

Avri Doria

Researcher, Technicalities ( dotgay LLC, APC, ... )
Avri Doria is a research consultant. She served on the UN Working Group on Enhanced Cooperation (WGEC) and the UN Working Group on Internet Governance (WGIG). She served as a member the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) Secretariat and is a member of the IGF Multistakeholder Advisory Group (IGF MAG). As a technologist she has been involved in the development of Internet protocols and architectures for over 30 years; is co-chair of a Research... Read More →



Tuesday November 10, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 6

09:00

BPF Regulation and mitigation of unsolicited communications
Spam continues to be a significant problem for Internet users, creating a burden for developing countries, networks, operators and all end users. High volumes of unsolicited email can cause significant impacts to regions with limited Internet access as well as raise concerns for all regions with the increasing malware infections that come from unwanted email. Unsolicited email may be magnified in developing countries, where high volumes of incoming and outgoing spam can cause a severe drain on the limited and costly bandwidth that is available in those regions. Cooperation and partnerships among all stakeholders is needed to develop strategies and approaches to mitigating spam. For that reason, addressing the problem of spam requires a multistakeholder discussion and a framework of suggested approaches, including the need to engage governments in the discussion of how to reduce the threat and impact of spam globally. This discussion with a panel of experts will focus on the “Regulation and mitigation of unwanted communications (e.g. "spam") draft outcome document and will include examples of best practices they use to address the proliferation of spam in their regions/country’s that might be useful to include in the draft as possible recommendations. Output expected from the session would be review and consensus regarding the draft outcomes document, feedback on the text and indication of support for the for the recommendations and next steps that the report outlines

Session Organizers
avatar for Wout de Natris

Wout de Natris

Consultant/owner, De Natris Consult
Apart from organising Workshop #153 'Let's break down silos in cyber security and cyber crime' on behalf of SIDN and NLIGF, you can talk to me about cyber security and SMEs, national and international cooperation and opportunities to build bridges between different silos. I'm interested to hear your views and/or discuss how I can aid you in achieving your goals in establishing cyber security and better prevent cyber crime.


Agenda docx

Tuesday November 10, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 5

09:00

WS 13 Keeping Your Credentials Secure Online: A Roundtable
Hackers realize the power of stealing credentials to crack open systems and gain access to critical information. And, because many organizations do an inadequate job of protecting their systems—despite patching, hardening, and firewalls—stealing credentials is an easy hacker target. Many compromises tie directly into issues relating to credential management. A cornerstone of all security strategies is an organization’s ability to control access to data and systems. Virtually all access controls rely on the use of credentials to validate the identities and permissions of users, applications, and devices. The roundtable will invite experts who have insights into the way in which the problems of credential management, which have so often proven intractable in practice despite reams of good advice from security professionals, have been addressed in real world environments and scenarios. These insights will come from civil society; the academic community; the financial sector; the technology sector; companies from the DNS and domain name management industry; operating system, browser, and games and apps developers; and social media companies. The roundtable will focus on the presentation of practical problems faced day to day, well publicized incidents, impacts on reputation and privacy, direct actions efforts taken, and measures to implement practical solutions that incorporate best practices for credential management. practical problems that exist to implement and improve a security and emerging best practices

Tuesday November 10, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 4

09:00

Dynamic Coalition on Accessibility and Disability

The Dynamic Coalition on Accessibility and Disability was established in IGF 2007 to facilitate interaction and ensure that ICT accessibility is included in the key debates around Internet Governance in order to build a future where all sectors of the global community have equal access to the Information Society. DCAD has organized workshops and activities at every annual IGF event since 2007.

DCAD developed a DCAD Accessibility Guidelines to provide guidelines to the IGF Secretariat on how to improve accessibility for persons with disabilities (include age related disabilities) of IGF meetings and to include accessibility for persons with disabilities into internet governance discussion.

To contribute to ‘intersessional work of IGF’, DCAD submitted the DCAD Accessibility Guidelines - Version 2 (2014) for public review and received comments (mostly editorial).

The DCAD meeting in IGF 2015 will be an opportunity for DCAD members to share information on their activities, discuss the DCAD action plan for the future and revise the DCAD Accessibility Guidelines taking into consideration of public comments received.

Links to DCAD work

DCAD homepage: http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/accessibility/dcad/Pages/default.aspx

DCAD in IGF’s website section on DCs (http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/accessibility/dcad/Pages/default.aspx).

Draft Agenda of DCAD meeting in IGF 2015

  1. Opening remarks and welcome
  2. Approval of the Agenda
  3. Review of the accessibility facilities at IGF 2015
  4. Review of IGF 2015 registration, transport and hotel accommodation
  5. Review of to the Internet facilities and connectivity
  6. Revision of the DCAD Accessibility Guidelines: lead editor (Francesca Cesi Bianchi)
  7. Review of IGF 2015 remote participation
  8. Preview of the accessibility related events in IGF 2015
  9. Review of DCAD activities since IGF 2014

Tuesday November 10, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 2

09:00

Dynamic Coalition on Child Online Safety
DATABASES, A TOOL TO DISRUPT THE DISSEMINATION OF CHILD ABUSE IMAGES IN DIGITAL ENVIRONMENTS

The session will address the types and purposes of the wide range of existing databases – image, hash value, etc. – and the role those repositories of data play  in disrupting the circulation of child abuse images in  digital environments. Examples will be shared on how  law enforcement, online reporting mechanisms for illegal content and  private companies use these databases to track, detect, block or  store data for criminal investigation purposes. The session is also designed  to explore existing challenges such as data sharing between data repositories,  data corruption,  and categorization of videos and images of child abuse.

SPEAKERS:
  • John Carr, European NGO Alliance for Child Safety Online
  • Carolyn Nguyen, Microsoft
  • Susie Hargreaves, Internet Watch Foundation
  • Katia Dantas, International Centre for Missing and Exploited Children 
MODERATOR: Marie-laure Lemineur, ECPAT International

REMOTE MODERATOR: Jim Prendergast, the Galway Strategy Group, Inc.

Session Organizers
avatar for Marie Laure Lemineur

Marie Laure Lemineur

Head of Global Programme Combating Sexual Exploitation of Children Online, ECPAT International


Tuesday November 10, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 3

09:00

WS 126 Can Internet rights and access goals be reconciled?
“Having your cake and eating it too: can Internet rights an access goals be reconciled?” is the title of this session to address how Internet governance often seems to navigate between two seemingly competing goals: on the one hand, the protection of desirable governance principles such as user privacy and the open architecture of the network; on the other, the provision of affordable access to Internet infrastructure and services to as many users as possible. The tensions between Internet governance principles and access goals are hardly new, dating back to the walled-garden architecture of early access services and privacy concerns over free email services. More recently, these tensions have resurfaced in debates about zero-rating plans offered by many mobile broadband operators in developing countries, which has pitted those defending neutrality principles against those arguing for expanded access opportunities for low-income populations. This roundtable session brings together academics, activists, and representatives from the public and private sectors for an honest, open format discussion about these tensions, particularly from a developing countries’ perspective. Key questions that will orient the debate are: How to strike a balance between these seemingly competing goals? Can empirical research help advance the discussion beyond the statement of principles? Are Internet governance principles necessarily at odds with expanded access goals? In other words, can we have our cake and it eat too? Are there best practices cases in developed or developing countries for striking such a balance? To what extent is government regulation desirable in this area?

Speakers:
  • José Clastornik, AGESIC – Uruguay
  • Helani Galpaya, LIRNEasia
  • Martín Waserman, Facebook
  • Eduardo Bertoni, Center for Studies on Freedom of Expression and Access to Information (CELE)
  • Alison Gillwald, ICT Africa
  • Carolina Botero, Karisma Foundation
  • Anriette Esterhuysen, Association for Progressive Communications (APC)
  • Sebastián Bellagamba, Regional Director for Latin America and the Caribbean for Internet Society
  • Juan Jung, Iberoamerican Association of Telecom Enterprises (AHCIET)
  • Mishi Choudhary, Software Freedom Law Center
Moderator: Hernan Galperín, Annenberg School for Communication - University of Southern California



Session Organizers
avatar for Carolina Aguerre

Carolina Aguerre

CETYS, UdeSA
I'm a researcher at the Center for Technology and Society (CETYS) and Professor at the Universidad de San Andres in Buenos Aires. I was a MAG member from 2012 to 2014 and have been involved in Internet governance issues since the preparations for WSIS in 2004. I have held policy related positions in the past as G. M at LACTLD. I hold a PhD in Social Sciences from the University of Buenos Aires.
avatar for Veronica Ferrari

Veronica Ferrari

Researcher, CELE - Centro de Estudios en Libertad de Expresión y Acceso a la Información


Tuesday November 10, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 1

09:00

WS 153 Freedom of Expression online: Gaps in policy and practice
While there is now global consensus that the right to freedom of expression applies in the digital environment, there is less clarity in how this applies in practice. In an effort to take a consistent approach to measuring freedom of expression online APC has developed indicators based on the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression Frank La Rue’s groundbreaking 2011 report. The indicators have been applied in around ten countries in Asia, Latin America, and the Pacific, by organisations working in those countries. This roundtable proposes to bring together groups that have applied the indicators in order to share experiences and identify gaps in policy and practice. The goal of the roundtable is both to critically assess the strengths and weaknesses of the La Rue indicators and to identify trends and areas for further research.

Tuesday November 10, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 9

09:00

WS 187 Promoting local actions to secure internet rights
The need to defend citizen rights on the internet is becoming increasingly difficult. This calls for a stronger and more coherent way in bringing together different actors across the globe to defend these rights and establish principles to support and guide internet public policies, legislation and stakeholder’s practices. Despite of the different degrees of consensus that multiple actors engaged in broad political and technical process are able to achieve, international dialogue spaces have been growing and gaining more attention. From UN Human Rights Council and IGF, to NetMundial so many initiatives have emerged to respond to increasing threats to freedom of expression, privacy, access and other human rights on the internet. However, the IG process is still opaque in many developing countries and public interest issues are not openly discussed or debated with all stakeholders at the national and community levels. Thus all these global mobilization overlook the fact that for many, this conversation around internet rights is virtually nonexistent. By bringing national organizations from across the globe, we want to address the question of how those international actions can be helpful to local campaigns to defend and advance rights. With a critical approach, this roundtable will discuss if global efforts and campaigns are actually making local actions more difficult or if they can effectively empower and be supportive in advancing internet rights. We will address IG and human rights discussion from a grassroots perspective, while sharing experiences from local organizations in a global setting.

Session Organizers
avatar for Anna Masera

Anna Masera

Head of Press Office and Communications, Camera dei deputati
Internet rights! | | Our preliminary event on November 9th is organized by the Italian Parliamentary Committee together with the Institute of Technology and Society of Rio de Janeiro: a workshop in room 6 in the morning and a big event at the Tambau Hotel in the evening. | | BUILDING INTERNET BILLS OF RIGHTS: challenges and opportunities | 09:00 am - 09:15 am - Welcome and introduction to the debate | (with a message from the President of... Read More →



Tuesday November 10, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room_10

09:00

WS 219 Addressing funding challenges for continuous innovation
During previous IGF workshops organized by the Seed Alliance in Bali and Istanbul we have focused on bringing the discussion about funding mechanisms for Internet development closer to the multi-stakeholder community that makes the Internet what it is today. Many opportunities created by aid agencies, philanthropists, governments, Corporate Social Responsibility programs and venture capital (to name a few) are available today. Their different approaches to support innovation on the field were presented, as well as efforts to identify what they have in common and what challenges they faced to reach out to the innovators on the field, to establish partnerships and the constant search for sustainability. The speakers and the audience highlighted the importance of training, mentoring and networking to be offered on business development, evaluation, and communication to position innovators as recognized contributors to the development of the Internet, specially those coming from the development world. On this workshop we want to continue the understanding of how funding for Internet innovation operates, the differences with other sectors, deepening the understanding of the Internet community collectively, as well as explore solutions together. **In light of the publication of the new Sustainable Development Goals in August 2015, after this proposal was approved, the organizers of the workshop will be exploring the link between funding opportunities to achieve Goal #9 "Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialisation and foster innovation" where 9c set the objective of "Significantly increase access to information and communications technology and strive to provide universal and affordable access to the Internet in least developed countries by 2020".

Tuesday November 10, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 8

09:00

WSIS+10 Consultations

IGF Day 1 - 10 November 2015 - 9:30-12:30

 

Brief Description/Objective


According to agreed processes at the United Nations General Assembly, the World Summit on the Information Society implementation will experience a ten year review.  Alongside the broader assessment of progress toward achieving an Information Society for all, since the conclusion of the two phase World Summit on the Information Society [WSIS], in Tunis, 2015, other questions such as the achievements of the IGF, its extension, and how enhanced cooperation, inclusion of women and youth, affordability of access to ICTs and the Internet, multilingual access and content, incorporation of multi stakeholder engagement and participation from developing countries, emerging economies, and least developed countries in Internet governance and WSIS processes contribute to the review of the overall WSIS. As is usual in a ten year review of a World Summit, the WSIS+10 process also looks forward to the post 2015 WSIS +SDGs environment. While the considerations of the role of the IGF, and its extension and evolution are incorporated into the WSIS+10 Review, the overall review is much broader, and inclusive of issues and questions that affect the much broader Internet governance ecosystem.   


Convening in Brazil, the IGF 2015 brings together the most diverse, inclusive and multi stakeholder community, on an equal footing, to address critical Internet governance policy issues and approaches  The WSIS+10 session at the IGF 2015 will take advantage of this unique and geo diverse multi stakeholder convening to examine the “Zero draft” prepared by UNGA resources, and under debate and consideration by UNGA, and provide an interactive consultation, in a real time setting, on the key themes and issues identified in the Zero Draft.  As an output from the interactive “town hall” consultation, a summarized report, and a real time transcript will be provided, along with an invitation to the participants in the interactive session to include summary messages in the further considerations for the second draft of the Draft negotiating documents for the High Level meeting of the General Assembly on WSIS +10 Review [scheduled for December 15-16, 2015.]

Invitations are extended to the Co Facilitators and UNGA PGA office to attend the IGF 2015, and interact with the diverse multi stakeholder community.

Agenda


The session will consist of three parts:


  • Part 1: Setting the scene. This part of the session would provide an overview of what WSIS+10 is, its scope and implications for the broader post 2015 WSIS environment and activities, including IGF extension and IGF evolution. In this part of the session, UNGA Co-facilitators and PGA Office would be invited to make statements regarding the preparatory process.


  • Part 2: Developing messages from the IGF community. In this part of the session, IGF stakeholders would be invited to share their views on the WSIS+10 with the aim to develop messages from the IGF community as input into the NY process. The basis for the interaction would be the WSIS+10 Review Zero Draft.


The session will model its comment process after the NETmundial organization of microphones - inputs would rotate across 5 microphones, with 4 dedicated to each IGF stakeholder community, and one microphone reserved for remote participants.


  • Part 3: Summary of key messages to be conveyed into the the formal preparatory process.


Time

Session

Format

Speaker

09:00 - 09:15

PART 1: Setting the scene/ Info sharing

Statements


Host Chair + MAG Chair

09:15 - 09:45

Co-facilitators

09:45 - 12:10

PART 2: Developing messages from the IGF community

Interactive open mike interaction based on Zero Draft

IGF community

12:10 - 12:30

PART 3: Recap of key messages

Presentation

Rapporteurs


 

Policy Questions


The policy questions in this session will be drawn from the WSIS+10 High Level Event Zero Draft. The specific questions would be developed and communicated to the IGF community in advance and posted on the IGF website.

A selected group of additional background documents is being gathered by the organisers and the Secretariat.

Host Country Chair: Mr. Andre Figueiredo, Minister of Communications of Brazil

 

Moderators


The session would be supported by designated moderators. Part 2 of the session will be modeled after the NETmundial consultation process. The moderators would be in charge of time management, and ensuring balanced rotation across stakeholder groups and remote participants.


Assigned rapporteurs will work in conjunction with a Secretariat-provided resource to synthesise the session messages.


Panelists


The format and content of this session do not lend itself to a traditional panel approach.


The session will model its comment process after the NETmundial organization of microphones to include broad and inclusive comments, using an organized document to guide time allocation of issues, and rotating across stakeholder groups to maximize diversity of opportunities to listen to views from stakeholders.


Participation by the UN WSIS Co-Facilitators has been confirmed. The session agenda takes into account their attendance.


Remote moderator/Plan for online interaction:

 

Remote participation will be accommodated through providing a dedicated remote moderator, who will take questions by tweet and by email.


The co-moderators of the session will be invited to acknowledge the Remote Comments in rotation with comments from within the room, to the greatest extent possible. The rapporteurs and Secretariat support will also follow the remote contributions.


‘Feeder’ workshops (if applicable) and/or connections with other sessions:


As most of the sessions and plenaries at the IGF 2015 are of impact to the WSIS+10 Review, this session - as the first main session on Day 1, will offer valuable input to the rest of the IGF program.

 

Desired results/output


Messages from the IGF community to be conveyed into the the formal WSIS+10 Review preparatory process.

Tuesday November 10, 2015 09:00 - 12:30
Main Meeting Hall

10:00

11:00

WS 124 Balancing privacy and transparency to promote freedom online
The Session seeks to stimulate debate on how to balance privacy and transparency in the context of protecting online freedom of expression. Free expression includes freedom of information, which in turn has a bearing on the issue of transparency – which is often a condition for the public to access particular information. Transparency in turn, however, articulates directly with privacy in regard to the collection, storage, analysis and sharing of personal data. This is particularly relevant to the digital age, and is a different issue to the historical focus on transparency as applied to governments and corporations as an antidote to corruption. UNESCO takes this opportunity to present the major research findings it has commissioned on the subject. Firstly, the session will examine those national regimes on data protection which place conditions on the collection, use and storage of personal data and are directly relevant to the protection of privacy on the Internet. Secondly, the session will also address the new challenges that in the digital age, the traditional way of applying FOI laws to public data and data protection laws to personal data need to be updated as a vast mixture of both personal and public data is collected, stored, processed and shared via the Internet, with the border between the public and private domains being blurred. The Session will eventually develop policy recommendations on how to ensure sufficient safeguards in the online environment so as to ensure a balance of privacy and transparency as a dimension of the right to information.

Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00 - 12:00
Workshop Room 7

11:00

Open Forum - DINL, Digital Infrastructure Association
In this open forum we wish to discuss the increase in government engagement with “the internet” to protect their citizens against crime and abuse and to protect economic interests and critical infrastructures. The fact that the traditional benign neglect of states towards the internet is increasingly replaced with political interest has positive and negative effects. We are particularly concerned with those state interventions – often for reasons of national security or economic interest - that impact on the technical and logical ‘core’ of the internet ecosystem – such as interventions in the DNS - and in the impact on organizations and businesses that are traditionally thought of as ‘technical’ and whose roles are in danger of being politicized, such as ISPs, CERTs and hard- and software developers. There is a growing need to separate out the legitimate interests of states from political overreach into the technical and logical core of the internet. A cooperative or constructive approach towards interaction, founded in firm principles, may strengthen the balance and lead to a sustainable protection of Internet values. In this open forum we will present ideas about an agenda for the international protection of ‘the public core of the internet’ and seek to collect and discuss ideas for the formulation of norms and principles and for the identification of practical steps towards that goal. More specifically we aim to discuss: A definition of a public core of the internet: this would comprise the core protocols and infrastructure of the internet which all governments should consider as a global public good, governed by the Internet community and protected from direct activities and involvement by any government Definitions of proper interfaces: outlining norms and mutual expectations that should govern the relations between governments and various central actors in the technical and economic internet ecosystem, such as ISPs, CERTs and hard- and software developers when it comes to fighting cybercrime, retrieve information, mandate takedowns, request information and more.

Speakers
In this IGF open forum DINL wants to explore these ideas and discuss them with thought leaders from other countries. Speakers include:
Bastiaan Goslings (AMS-IX, NL)
Jyoti Panday (CIS, India)
Marilia Maciel (FGV, Brasil)
Dennis Broeders (NL Scientific Council for Government Policy)
and will be chaired by Michiel Steltman (DINL),
but aims to broaden the debate on this issue with those present.

About DINL
The Digital Infrastructure Netherlands (DINL) foundation was set up to promote the strong and continuous development of the Netherlands as one of the major hubs within the global digital infrastructure. DINL’s founding fathers are the DDA (datacenter association), the DHPA and ISPconnect (representing the hosting sector), NLNet, SURFnet (the academic network), AMSIX (one of the world’s largest Internet Exchange points) and SIDN (the ccTld registry for .nl). DINL works closely with government, politics, industry, NGO’s and press.


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00 - 12:00
Workshop Room 3

11:00

Open Forum - ITU

ITU will present its recently launched Emerge Partnership, which aims to provide a focus group to better hear the needs of the SME sector. The Emerge Partnership brings together a network of stakeholders that are working to support local, regional and international innovation and entrepreneurial ecosystems, to increase dialogue with government policy-makers and regulators who provide a vital enabling environment for private enterprises.

The Partnership includes representatives from the United Nations and Intergovernmental Organizations, ICT industry, private sector companies, academia/research institutions, incubator/hub managers, development/innovation practitioners, aid agencies/donors, private/public sector procurement specialists, and investors.

Emerge Partnership: www.emergepartnership.org


Session Organizers
avatar for Despoina Sareidaki

Despoina Sareidaki

International Telecommunication Union (ITU)
ICT Policy Analyst specializing in the area of Cybersecurity and Internet Policy


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00 - 12:00
Workshop Room 2

11:00

BPF Enabling Environments to Establish successful IXPs

Internet exchange points (IXPs) are a well-established concept. There is a substantial body of knowledge within the IXP operator and member community regarding best practices and the characteristics of local environments that are conducive to the formation and success of IXPs. However, such knowledge is not evenly distributed, and some stakeholders have expressed a need for greater awareness. Therefore, the aim of this BPF is to make existing community knowledge more widely available.

The Best Practices Forum in IXPs will explain why IXPs matter and focus on ways to create enabling environments that allow IXPs to develop and flourish.

The draft best practice outcome document that will be presented and discussed during the session is open for public comments on the IGF Review platform.  


Session Agenda  -  Room 5

1. Welcome and Introdution

  • Welcome and opening of the session 
  • Best Practices Forum on IXP introduction
2.  Role and Benefits of an Internet Exchange point 
  • Overview of the role and benefits of an IXP
  • Q&A and discussion 
3. The IXP's Stakeholder and Environment
  • Overview of the IXP's stakholders and environment
  • Q&A and discussion
4. Challenges and creating an enabling environment
  • Challenges
  • Creating an enabling environment 
  • Policy messages
  • Q&A and discussion
5. Wrap up and next steps

Remote moderator: Michael Oghia

Session Organizers
avatar for Wim Degezelle

Wim Degezelle

Consultant, DUERMOVO
Independent consultant on DNS and Internet Governance related topics. Consultant with the IGF Secretariat for the Best Practices Forums on IXPs and IPv6 .



Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 5

11:00

WS 188 Spectrum allocations: challenges & opportunities at the edge
Several forms of wireless technologies became essential to disseminate connectivity at the edges of the Internet. As a consequence, the relevance of pluralist participation in radio spectrum regulatory policies cannot be overstated. With increasing demand for access to mobile communication services, efficient and equitable allocation and use of spectrum is essential to ensure widespread benefit from access to this critical asset of the commons. Recent developments in radio technologies and the upcoming (or already present) transition to digital television open up significant opportunities for local governments, local entrepreneurs and communities to create innovative applications. Of particular interest to communities at the edge of the Internet which this workshop will address in a dialogue using the roundtable format are: - monitoring on actual/effective use of already allocated spectrum chunks at the local level; - opportunities and challenges derived from the worldwide transition to digital TV, regarding community-level use of spectrum in the VHF/UHF bands reallocated or freed up in that transition; - regulatory and legislative processes which might affect various forms of spectrum usage (light licensing, shared spectrum and secondary use) for local entrepreneurs, communities and local governments, in view of the latest advancements in cognitive radio technologies.

Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 1

11:00

WS 118 How communities restore trust in the digital environment
Over the past years, cyber security incidents have increased in frequency and magnitude be it due to human error, malware or crime. This development has negatively impacted on trust in the digital environment and led to a myriad of responses, some of which have raised questions as to whether they support the openness of and equitable access to the internet. The challenge now is to find solutions to restore the trust among those who use and rely on the internet for a variety of purposes (professional/business, private/social, public/government), while safeguarding freedom of expression and ensuring privacy. The domain name system is one of the fundamental building blocks of the internet. It depends on and is essential for the stability of the internet. The ccTLD community is strongly committed to the principles of openness, resilience, stability and security of the internet. Over the past three decades the ccTLD community has contributed to increasing cybersecurity, expanding and deepening the dialogue with local internet stakeholders and supporting the public good. The roundtable will bring together representatives of the ccTLD community and other internet stakeholders who are working towards increasing trust online. The objective is to showcase initiatives that local internet communities and ccTLDs have implemented. They include best-practice sharing and capacity-building, education courses on ICT literacy and awareness of cybersecurity threats for the local internet community, involving internet stakeholders (end-users, civil society, local authorities, businesses) in a dialogue on enhancing community connectivity and improving cooperation for a secure, reliable, stable and resilient internet.

Session Organizers

Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 4

11:00

Dynamic Coalition on Net Neutrality

Annual Meeting of the Dynamic Coalition on Network Neutrality 

10 November, 11:00-12:30, Room 6 

 

Over the past two years, the network neutrality debate has become a leading priority for both national and international policy makers. While some countries have explicitly banned discriminatory traffic management practices, such as blocking, throttling and paid prioritisation, other countries are currently formulating network neutrality laws and regulations or considering whether and how to properly regulate Internet traffic management.

 

The panellists will explore issues such as the relevance of net neutrality for consumers, the compatibility of zero rating offerings with the network neutrality principle and the elaboration of sustainable approaches to foster non-discriminatory Internet traffic management. Importantly, panellist interventions will be based on their contribution to the annaual report of the DCNN, included in Part III of the Net Neutrality Compendium, a book encompassing the three-year-long work of the Dynamic Coalition on Network Neutrality that will be presented and distributed during the event.

 

Meeting Agenda

 

-        Introduction and moderation: Luca Belli, Center for Technology and Society at Fundação Getulio Vargas

 

-        Keynote: Vint Cerf, Google

 

-        Roundtable with the authors of the 3rd DCNN annual report, included in Part III of the Net Neutrality Compendium:

  • Chis Marsden, Sussex University
  • Elise Lindeberg, Norwegian Communications Authority  
  • René Arnold, WIK Consult
  • Konstantinos Stylianou, University of Leeds
  • Primavera De Filippi, Université Paris 2 & Berkman Center 
  • Nathalia Foditsch, American University

 

-        Presentation of the Input Document on Network Neutrality, to be discussed as a DCNN outcome during the Main Session on Dynamic Coalition outcomes. Luca Belli, Center for Technology and Society at Fundação Getulio Vargas

 

-        Open Debate with the audience

 

 

 

 

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Luca Belli

Luca Belli

Researcher, Center for Technology and Society at FGV
Luca Belli, PhD, is Senior Researcher at the Center for Technology and Society (CTS) of Fundação Getulio Vargas Law School, Rio de Janeiro, where he leads the 'Internet Governance @ FGV' project. Luca is also associated researcher at the Centre de Droit Public Comparé of Paris 2 University. Before joining CTS, Luca worked for the Council of Europe Internet Governance Unit; served as a Network Neutrality Expert for the Council... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 6

11:00

WS 114 Implementing Core Principles in the Digital Age
Building on Brazil's and Germany's joint initiatives in the Unites Nations as well as on their overall bilateral cooperation, the roundtable aims to stir a discussion on key Internet Governance principles. Declaring democracy, accountability and human rights as a basis for policy-making in Internet Governance is only the first step to effectively promote these core principles. Next steps should tackle the challenge of implementing such concepts. This roundtable will help identify the different layers as well as the fora in which to address the implementation of core principles in Internet Governance. To that end, speakers from different sectors have been invited. The Special Rapporteurs on Freedom of Expression and the Right to Privacy will address the legal challenges for human rights in the digital age. Niels ten Oever is a member of the IETF study group on human rights and standards and will present the technical implications of promoting and implementing human rights. Sheetal Kumar has been working to increase awareness of the work done in ITU study groups and their impact on the overall ITU policies, she is also concerned about the lack of human rights consideration in cybersecurity. She will present the civil society perspective of how to influence policy-making in Internet Governance globally. Nanjira Sambuli will add the challenges that enterprises face when implementing human rights, this will be linked both to considerations of market advantages and transparency.

Session Organizers
CB

Cathleen Berger

International Cyber Policy Coordination Staff, Federal Foreign Office


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room_10

11:00

WS 151 Hate and discriminatory speech and FoE online
An undeniable tension is growing between defenders of freedom of expression and vulnerable groups targeted by virulent threats and harassing messages on the Internet (e.g. women, LGBTI community). Not surprisingly, many of those whose voices and online participation have been curtailed by harassment and digital violence seek the imposition of additional mechanisms for de-anonymizing harassers, and for controlling and blocking online content. On the other hand, many digital activists and civil liberties advocates emphatically reject these views, raising concerns about the speech chilling effects of censorship-based approaches. The proposed workshop seeks to generate discussion across a spectrum of viewpoints with the aim of building bridges and examining the roles to be played by all stakeholders (e.g. state, intermediaries, users, and civil society). The question to be evaluated is how to deal with freedom of expression tensions and to balance the exercise of rights online in order to foster a healthy online environment aimed at maximizing the free speech, privacy and equality rights of all.

Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 8

11:00

WS 29 Digital economy, jobs and multistakeholder practices
Amid the recent economic crisis, the digital economy has not faltered or failed to deliver. Rather, it has continued to deliver new business opportunities, open markets and create jobs with promising potential to multiply this in both developing and developed markets. This workshop explores how multistakeholder practices can be efficient mechanisms for addressing challenges that are hindering the full realization of these potentials. Some of the challenges include the financial and regulatory risks in starting up new businesses or creating new infrastructures; appropriate skills development practices and infrastructures to address the availability of skills necessary for creating, consuming, and maintaining these new services; existence of network externalities and barriers to trade; institutional linkages to higher education, research and business. The aim of this workshop is to bring together representatives from international organizations, the private sector, academia, government and civil society to address the employment and skills challenges raised by the digital economy, and to assess the role that multistakeholder cooperation could play in implementing the policies required to facilitate the structural and social adjustment necessary for sustainable development. Examples of best practices and shortcomings will be analysed, along with potential new approaches. Workforce mobility and related changes in labour law, increasing labour market participation of women, youth, and the underserved, needs for innovative educational initiatives, challenges to workforce in the age of new technologies and identification of resources to support these transformations, call for new solutions that could benefit tremendously from multistakeholder practices.

Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 9

12:00

WS 159 The Right to Protest Online
In the digital age, protests are no longer limited to assemblies and gatherings in physical spaces but are increasingly taking place, in whole or in part, online. This presents new challenges and opportunities for protests in two ways. First, digital technologies are used as a medium for organizing of and reporting on protests. Second, the Internet is increasingly being used as a platform of protests as people “gather” in online spaces and engage in new forms of virtual protests. Although calls have been made to recognise the right to protest online, there has been little human rights analysis of what this actually entails. Moreover, cybercrime laws in numerous countries outlaw many virtual protests without considering their impact on human rights. The issue of protests and digital technologies therefore deserves attention from an Internet governance perspective. This session will explore these issues both from a theoretical and practical perspective, considering questions such as what types of “virtual protests” should be protected, what legislative and policy changes are needed to allow for protection, what factors should law enforcement or judicial authorities consider in cases that present a violation of existing laws. At the session, ARTICLE 19 will also present The Right to Protest Principles, which set out minimum standards on contemporary forms of protests, including online. The session will improve the participants’ understanding of challenges to the protection of freedom of expression and assembly online in the context of protests. It will also identify opportunities for joint advocacy in this area at both UN and regional levels.

Session Organizers
GG

Gabrielle Guillemin

Senior Legal Officer, ARTICLE 19
Gabrielle is Senior Legal Officer at ARTICLE 19, an international free speech organisation based in London. She has been leading the organisation's work on internet policy issues since 2011. She is a member of the UK Multistakeholder Advisory Group on Internet Governance (MAGIG) and an independent expert attached to the Council of Europe committee on Cross-border flow of Internet traffic and Internet Freedoms. Prior to ARTICLE 19, Gabrielle... Read More →



Tuesday November 10, 2015 12:00 - 13:00
Workshop Room 7

12:00

12:30

Mentor Youth Meetup
This is a causal social event for youth to interact with senior participants of IGF, we have confirmed 8 MAG members to attend the Youth Mentor Meetup. Please feel free to join us!

Format: Starting with self introduction of each mentors, then will break into small groups, then can either cover the guiding questions / let them ask questions. Each small group will take around 15 minutes, then will rotate again to make sure everyone gets to meet all of you.

Guiding Questions
  1. How did I get involved in IG?
  2. When was my first time at IGF? How was it?
  3. How did I keep up to learn the IG knowledge?
  4. What i wished I had done earlier?
  5. Why I want to engage with youth?

Session Organizers
avatar for Bianca

Bianca

Dotkids
#youth #engagement & #enablement | #startups | | Email me at bianca@dotkids.asia
avatar for David NG

David NG

Director of Community Development, DotAsia Organisation
David has been devoted to the advocacy of children's rights in Hong Kong and international level since 1999 when he was selected to be one of the Ambassadors of United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) and as a founding member of the Children’s Council in Hong Kong, he co-founded Kids' Dream, the first child-led organization based in Hong Kong, promoting children's rights locally and regionally in 2006. | | For long... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2015 12:30 - 14:00
Workshop Room 4

12:30

Seed Alliance Awards Ceremony
Session Organizers
avatar for Sylvia Cadena

Sylvia Cadena

Community Partnerships Specialist / ISIF Asia coordinator, APNIC
Internet development, capacity building, funding for innovation


Tuesday November 10, 2015 12:30 - 14:00
Workshop Room 1

14:00

Setting the Scene
This year the main theme of the IGF aligning with global goals of promoting sustainable development through the Internet after deliberation and consensus was chosen as: “Evolution of Internet Governance: Empowering Sustainable Development” as the overarching theme. This theme will be supported by eight sub-themes that will frame the discussion for this main session at João Pessoa: ♣ Cybersecurity and trust; Bertrand de La Chapelle ♣ The Internet economy; Hossam Elgahmal ♣ Inclusiveness and diversity; Hasanul Haq Inu (Min. ICT Bangladesh) & Rahul Gosain (Director Deity- Digital India) ♣ Openness; Vint Cerf, Google ♣ Enhancing multistakeholder cooperation; Peter Major ♣ The Internet and human rights; Matjaž Gruden, COE and UNESCO rep ♣ Critical Internet resources; and CIRA- Byron, Paul Wilson ♣ Emerging issues: Paul Mitchell, Microsoft ♣ Intercessional work: BPFs – Constance Bommelear, ISOC Goal: The goal of this session is therefore set the stage for the IGF with a panel that frames each of IGF2015's sub-themes by highlighting related topical issues as well as provide participants with a high level bird’s eye view about how these sub-themes will be addressed during the rest of the IGF. This session hopes to deconstruct the key policy issues around each sub theme wherever applicable. Duration: 1hour with about half of this time dedicated to discussion. Format: A moderated panel made up of speakers with expertise on the sub-themes complemented by organisers or panelists of other main sessions. Inputs will be kept short. The moderators will be assisted by people with roving mikes in the room. The session will be opened by panelists giving a 2-3 minute input on topical and contentious issues relevant to the sub-themes 35 minutes) Questions from floor and debate among speakers (25 minutes) Overview of how the subthemes will be covered at IGF2015 with a reflection on the Inter-sessional work this year as well and how best stakeholder engagement can be amplified through the IGF. Facilitation/ Moderation: The roundtable will be co-facilitated by Amb. David Gross and Subi Chaturvedi

Tuesday November 10, 2015 14:00 - 15:00
Workshop Room_10

15:00

15:45

 
Wednesday, November 11
 

08:10

ICC BASIS Business Briefing
*This meeting is open to Business attendees only

Wednesday November 11, 2015 08:10 - 08:50
Workshop Room_10

09:00

WS 259 An Observatory of Web Accessibility - the case of Portugal
Portugal was the first Member State from European Union to adopt accessibility guidelines to Public Administration websites: the WCAG 1.0 in August 1999. Since February 2013 that the WCAG 2.0 make also part of the National Regulation of Digital Interoperability (RNID) used by Public Administration and also apllied to all State business sector.

All the work carried out since 1999 made Web accessibility to become a quality requirement of the digital content and services online, mainly in the Portuguese Public Administration. National studies show that an accessibility significant improvement happened between 2006 and 2008 and that was consolidated in 2010: we passed from 25% compliance of the Web sites of Central Public Administration in 2006 to 75% compliance in 2010 (level A of WCAG 1.0). The UN study [1] published in February 2011 put Portugal in the 2nd position among 192 analysed countries concerning Web accessibility best practices.

Beside advisory services and training sessions, Portugal has focused in monitoring systems. Comprehensive reporting of practices, with precise identification of the problem, emphasizing the possible solutions and pointing the resource material to find the better way to avoid the accessibility barriers. More than searching for errors, the tools that Portugal has developed aim to distinguish the good and the bad practices. More than penalizing, it is important to make a pedagogical approach to teaching / learning.

The presentation aims to show and discuss some of the assumptions of AccessMonitor and use of it to create a Web Accessibility Observatory as a tool of awareness to drive the accessibility of web content.

Wednesday November 11, 2015 09:00 - 09:30
Workshop Room 5

09:00

Open Forum - ICANN

The ICANN Open Forum aims to update participants on progress ICANN has made in key areas of its work since last year’s IGF in Istanbul. This is an interactive session where participants will have the opportunity to engage in an open dialogue with ICANN’s leadership and exchange views on various issues.

The Forum is also an opportunity for ICANN to expand beyond its regular community and reach out to new audience. Anyone with interest in what ICANN does is welcome to attend.

Format: Panel with a moderator who will invite panelists to make short interventions and facilitate Q&A session with the audience.

Discussion: The session will highlight key ICANN developments since IGF Istanbul meeting, and shed some light on ICANN globalization efforts and engagement strategies towards government and non-government stakeholders.

Duration: 60 minutes 

Moderator: Rinalia Abdul Rahim, ICANN Board Director

Speakers: 

  • Steve Crocker, Chairman of the ICANN Board
  • Fadi Chehade, President and CEO
  • Rodrigo De La Parra, Vice President, Stakeholder Engagement, Latin America and the Caribbean 

Session Organizers
avatar for Baher Esmat

Baher Esmat

Vice President, Global Stakeholder Engagement, Middle East, ICANN
Baher Esmat is a leading voice on Internet policy and regulatory issues in the Middle East. In his role as ICANN Regional Vice President, he is part of the advance guard of Internet proponents for a free, open and affordable Internet within the Arab world. | A keen facilitator of collaboration and dialogue between ICANN and the broader Internet community, Baher promotes and supports domain name system operations initiatives and capacity-building... Read More →


Wednesday November 11, 2015 09:00 - 10:00
Workshop Room 3

09:00

BPF Creating an Enabling Environment for IPv6 Adoption

Widespread adoption of IPv6 is crucial to the Internet’s sustainable growth; the number of available IPv4 addresses is nearly exhausted, and the Internet needs more address space to grow.

The Best Practice Forum (BPF) on Creating an Enabling Environment for IPv6 Adoption through survey responses, discussion on an open mailing list, and over several calls, identified and discussed best practices for promoting IPv6 in the private and public sectors.  Discussion also canvassed the work of IPv6 Task Forces, research and education networks, capacity-building and certification in IPv6, and more.

The 90-minute session will canvas three case studies, and address public comments provided via the IGF’s open, public platform, on our draft outcome document. We will also discuss key messages that can be taken from this session to the Main Session on IGF Intersessional Work.

The co-organizers of the BPF will develop the final outcome document, to be published on November 27th, in light of the discussion that unfolds during this session and comments received on the platform.

Download the draft BPF IPv6 outcome document (.pdf)
Submit your comments on the BPG IPv6 review platform 


Session Agenda   -   Room 2

9:00 - 9:45   

Introductions:

  • About the BPF, by Izumi Okutani (JPNIC)

  • Scene Setting on IPv6 Adoption, by Bob Hinden (ISOC)

Case Studies: (5mins per case study)

  • The German Federal Office of Administration: “IPv6 Profiles,” by Constanze Buerger (BVA);

  • Venezuelan IPv6 Task Force: “Public policy proposal for the deployment of IPv6 in Venezuela,” by Alejandro Acosta (LACNIC).

There will be time for brief discussion following each case study.


9:45 - 10:15
 
Discussion on the outcome document:

  • This time will be used to address comments received on the draft outcome document, and solicit on-the-spot feedback from contributors and attendees.


10:15 - 10:30
 
Summary and main messages:

  • We will wrap up the session with a brief summary, discussion on the future of the IPv6 BPF, and by converging on main messages we wish to present during the Main Session on IGF Intersessional Work.


In-person moderators: Marco Hogewoning (RIPE NCC), Susan Chalmers (Chalmers & Associates)    

Subject Matter Experts: Aaron Hughes (6connect CEO, ARIN board), Silvia Hagen (Swiss IPv6 Council).       

Remote moderator: Michael Oghia (ISOC Ambassador)                

The coordinators of the  BPF on IPv6 Adoption are Izumi Okutani, Wim Degezelle, and Susan Chalmers.



Session Organizers
avatar for Susan Chalmers

Susan Chalmers

Principal Consultant, Chalmers & Associates
Open Internet advocate, MAG member.
avatar for Wim Degezelle

Wim Degezelle

Consultant, DUERMOVO
Independent consultant on DNS and Internet Governance related topics. Consultant with the IGF Secretariat for the Best Practices Forums on IXPs and IPv6 .



Wednesday November 11, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 2

09:00

BPF Online Abuse and Gender-Based Violence Against Women
The IGF best practice forum (BPF) on Online Abuse and Gender-Based Violence Against Women is both timely and instructive considering the increasing effort by different stakeholders at national and global levels to understand and address the problem of online abuse and gender-based violence against women. It has showed that there are no one-size-fits all solutions, and that greater study is needed to further investigate the range of acts, underlying causes, diversity and scope of impact, and potential responses that can be developed for the issue. 

The BPF used an open and inclusive process to gather a broad variety of views and inputs on this multidimensional problem over the past nine months. As a result of this community-driven process, the BPF’s draft findings reflect a rich diversity of responses from various stakeholders and regions regarding the issue. 

Join us and our interactive panel at this session to discuss not only the BPF’s draft findings and recommendations for further exploration, but also the ways in which the problem of online abuse and gender-based violence can continue to be addressed at both the IGF as a critical platform for multistakeholder engagement on key internet policy, governance and human rights issues, and in other policy discussion spaces.

The BPF's third draft, Draft JP, can be downloaded in the section below.

Facilitator: Jac Kee, Association for Progressive Communications, Malaysia

Panelists:

Agustina Callegari, Personal Data Protection Center, Ombudsman's Office of Buenos Aires City, Argentina
David Kaye
, UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression
Frane Mareovic, Director Office of the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media
Gary Fowlie, Head ITU Liaison Office to the UN in New York, USA
Hibah Hussein
, Public Policy Analyst, Google, USA
Mariana Valente
, Director: InternetLab, Brazil
Narelle Clark
, Australian Communications Consumer Action Network; Immediate Past President of ISOC (Australian Chapter), Australia
Nighat Dad
, Digital Rights Foundation, Pakistan
Patrick Penninckx
, Council of Europe Head of the Information Society Department
Rebecca McKinnon
, Global Voices Online, USA


Session Organizers
AV

Anri van der Spuy

Internet Governance Forum



Wednesday November 11, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 6

09:00

WS 156 Zero-rating and neutrality policies in developing countries
This roundtable is aimed to go in depth in one of the emerging topics regarding internet governance: can net neutrality have exceptions when we discuss about access of internet in countries from Global South?

The question that we try to address has started to be developed in countries where zero-rated services have emerged and have become a seemingly convenient way to experience key services on the internet that would otherwise be unaffordable or too costly. For some states and companies, their reach would allow more people, especially from developing countries, to become part of a global exchange of ideas.

However, these services also raise several concerns, especially from civil society and technical sectors. Do zero-rated services provide real access to the internet? Should exceptions to net neutrality be allowed? Which exceptions, then? Is it fair to provide access only for certain private platforms and not others? Are zero-rated services a threat to the free and open internet? Can be the zero-rated services considered as a public policy?

Thus, in this roundtable we will try to advance in the nuances of the net neutrality concept from the perspective of participants from the Global South, where access to the internet is still a huge problem and some zero-rated services are being applied.

==================================

Wednesday November 11, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 4

Confirmed panelists:

Andrés Sastre, Asociación Interamericana de Empresas de Telecomunicaciones.
Emilar Vushe, Africa Policy Coordinator at APC
Nanjira Sambuli, Researcher on the Networked News Lab
Jorge Vargas, Regional Manager for Strategic Partnerships - Latam at Wikimedia
Bruno Magrani. Head of Public Policy, Facebook Brazil
Anja Kovacs, director of the Internet Democracy Project in Delhi, India

==================================

Session Organizers
avatar for Paz Pena

Paz Pena

Advocacy Director, Derechos Digitales
avatar for Claudio Ruiz

Claudio Ruiz

Executive Director, Derechos Digitales


Wednesday November 11, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 4

09:00

WS 32 Mobile and IoT Expand Inclusion for Persons w/ Disabilities
Mobile telephony, cloud computing, and the Internet of Things (IoT) are being harnessed in increasingly innovative ways to enhance the quality of life for people with disabilities, expand their access to the Internet, and enhance their participation in the Internet governance ecosystem. In coming years, ever-growing portions of the estimated one billion people (15 % of the world’s population) living with a disability potentially will have the technological means to avail themselves of the richness of the Internet and make important, productive contributions to the digital economy. 

The potential for greater inclusiveness provided by mobile and IoT is all the more compelling for emerging economies, which according to the World Health Organization, are home to 80 % of the world’s disabled. Yet, many of these economies have yet to tap the enormous potential of these technologies owing to challenges related to infrastructure and networks, capacity building, Internet governance, privacy and security policies. 

This Roundtable discussion will enable speakers to share best practices and strategies for deploying mobile, IoT, and other emerging technologies to increase accessibility support and services for those disabilities. The speakers also will examine infrastructural and technical requirements and consider what needs to be done – in terms of financial support, policy and regulatory frameworks -- to enable emerging economies to more effectively engaged the under-utilized talents of important population minority. 

Wednesday November 11, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room_10

09:00

WS 31 The “Right to be Forgotten” Rulings and their Implications
Co-Organizers

Mr Sérgio Branco - Instituto de Tecnologia e Sociedade do Rio de Janeiro

Ms Marianne Franklin - Internet Rights and Principles Coalition /Goldsmiths (University of London, UK)

Mr Hernán E. Vales - Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

Description

This workshop discusses the legal, technical, and societal implications of “Right to Be Forgotten” decisions, in the EU and elsewhere (e.g. Brazil) for internet design, access, and use. This workshop focuses on the procedural and legal implications of such rulings. It is part of a cross-workshop collaboration with Workshop 142 which looks more closely at some case-studies of "Right to Be Forgotten" rulings around the world.

In this workshop participants address challenges arising from terminology, implementation, and due process for the;
(1) legal (in)applicability within and beyond jurisdictions;
(2) commercial and technical challenges of implementation;
(3) societal implications for the public interest when deleting/delinking/delisting hyperlinked online content.

The human rights implications of implementation include freedom of expression, right to access to information, privacy and personal data, and accountability. Specific questions addressed include: - Terminology: is the ruling on an existing or emergent right? Which term is appropriate: “forgotten”, “delinking”, “deletion”, or “delisting”?
- Who decides, in what context and by what process e.g. a judge or service provider?
- What content, and which actors gain, or lose from such rulings? Do these decisions account for overlaps between public/private figures and their public/private lives?
- Technical issues: e.g. limits to deletion, delinking for data-retention policies, ownership and control of data-logs, how de/linking capabilities can be misused.
- sociocultural issues within and across jurisdiction e.g. limits in application so as not to harm access to information, distort historical record, or obstruct efforts to obtain accountability for past human rights violations.

Objectives:

Outcomes: (i) agree on clearer precisions of above points from respective stakeholder and global and regional/national perspectives; (ii) Outline set of judicial principles for implementing“R2BF” decisions; (iii) make respective recommendations for future rulings; (iv) decide a more appropriate name for such decisions.

Participants

Mr Pedro Less Andrade - Director Government Affairs & Public Policy, Google Corporation, Latin America, Argentina  
Mr Sérgio Branco - Instituto de Tecnologia e Sociedade do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Ms Mishi Choudhary - Software Freedom Law Center, India/New York
Ms Kelly Kim - Open Net (http://opennetkorea.org), Korea
Mr Pedro Vaca Villarreal - Fundación para la Libertad de Prensa, Columbia
Mr Hernán E. Vales- Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

With Mr Kevin Risser and Students from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs (Syracuse University) by Remote Hub: The remote hub at Syracuse University is being coordinated by graduate and undergraduate students from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, College of Law and School of Information Studies. Students in the remote hub hope to engage the larger Syracuse community about issues related to Internet regulation and privacy. 

Moderator
Ms Marianne Franklin - Internet Rights and Principles Coalition /Goldsmiths (University of London UK)

Rapporteur: Ms Argyro P Karanasiou - Bournemouth University/ISOC
Remote Participation Moderator - tbc

Background Documentation - Some links to the relevant rulings are below.

 Law Review Articles

 

 

Session Organizers
avatar for Marianne Franklin

Marianne Franklin

IRPC Steering Committee / Professor of Global Media & Poiitics (Goldsmiths, UK), Internet Rights & Principles Coalition / Goldsmiths (University of London, UK)
http://internetrightsandprinciples.org/site/ @netrights http://www.gold.ac.uk/media-communications/staff/franklin/ @GloComm


Wednesday November 11, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 1

09:00

WS 49 No Grey Areas – Against Sexual Exploitation of Children
Fortunately, many international laws prohibit child sexual abuse imagery (CSAI) and these laws have been used by industry leaders to make it much harder to find such content on the Internet. However, sexual exploitation of children often begins with content that doesn’t cross the lines drawn by the law, but is still exploitative and deeply disturbing. Depictions showing children in an unnatural, sexually suggestive posture are spread throughout the Internet and are easy to find. This content damages children’s dignity and privacy. There is also a risk that proliferation of this content normalises the sexualisation of minors and makes people think it is an everyday occurrence. The workshop will address how collaboration of stakeholders from industry, government, research and the welfare sector can set the scene for combating and condemnation of such content. Light will be shed on the so called "Grey Areas of (legal) sexual exploitation of children, and countermeasures will be discussed. Bringing together technical knowledge and analytical research expertise on the one hand with the victim's and perpetrator's perspective on the other will design a new approach to fighting CSAI. Artificial intelligence can be of tremendous value for understanding the concepts of provision of CSAI and posing imagery and comprehending the search strategies of perpetrators regards such imagery. In addition knowledge regards commercial transactions and cash flows will help to develop a strategy of combating and condemnation of CSAI in a broad understanding, i. e. covering also the "Grey Area" of (legal) child sexual exploitation.

Wednesday November 11, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 9

09:00

WS 96 #AfricanInternetRights: whose rights are these anyway?
How can a stronger policy framework for human rights online benefit all stakeholders? This is the challenge that this roundtable discussion seeks to address by exploring how initiatives such as the African Declaration on Internet Rights and Freedoms can benefit policy makers, the business and technical community, civil society and individuals. 2015 is a determining year for both the global development and Internet governance agendas; with decisions on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the future of multi-stakeholderism in Internet governance following the WSIS +10 review, due. Initiatives such as the African Declaration are example of how a rights-based Internet policy environment can be established. Using the Declaration as an example from the African continent of how this could be achieved, the roundtable invites participants from all stakeholder groups to present their perspectives on digital human rights and their impact on policy, the digital economy and innovation. The roundtable will open with a brief summary on the rights and principles that the Declaration covers, and the policy gaps that it seeks to address. Participants will then be invited to present their views, both on the Declaration itself and the broader question. We will seek to focus discussion on the opportunities and limitations that the Declaration, and similar initiatives, present.

Wednesday November 11, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 7

09:00

Internet Economy and Sustainable Development

IGF Day 2 - 10 November 2015 - 9:00-12:30

 

Please check the paper « the internet and Sustainable Development » by Constance Bommelaer, ISOC and the article « Development Digital Divide » by Carl Bildt, Sweden former foreign minister. Please also check « Transforming our World : the 2030 agenda for sustainable development »  from the UN, we have also “Ericsson & Earth Institute: Information Technology key to achieving new UN Sustainable Development Goals” as a good practice. We have from a visionary perspective “Global Trends to 2030: Can the EU meet the challenges ahead?” by European Strategy and Policy Analysis System & also “the Global Risks 2015” from the WEF.

The new post-2015 UN Development Agenda builds on the millennium development goals, eight anti- poverty targets that the world committed to achieving by 2015. While tremendous progress has been exhibited via MDGs, including the value of bringing together a diverse agenda by establishing goals and targets, there is further scope for improvement.  The UN Member States are in the process of finalizing Sustainable Development Goals (SDGS) as a part of the new Agenda to achieve the unfinished objectives, and to do so by 2030.

The session will include discussions on the following :

 

·   The Vision toward 2030 :

o   Sustainable Development long term opportunities and challenges

·   Internet Economy & Internet Role in Delivering the SDGs (Key opportunities & key Success Factors)

o   Human Capital

a.     Internet Entrepreneurship-

b.     Equality-

c.      ICT Capacity building-

o   Applications

d.     Right to Health, Education, timely Justice, environment protection, society engagement-

e. Access to Information-

f.   Availability of Local Content Online-

g.     Intellectual Property Right-

o   Access and Infrastructure

Internet Availability and Affordability:

o   Policy and Regulatory Support and Business eco-system

To enable Access, Applications and Content development and usage, Entrepreneurship and Capacity building.

·   Aligning the next phase of IGF with the SDGs /Post 2015 UN Develpment Agenda:

o   Optimizing Eco System and Multistakeholder approach

 

Agenda:

 

The discussions at the IGF session should reflect the importance of Internet Economy enabling policies and eco-system for the fulfillment of different SDGs.

 

This would be a U Shape round table.

The main session would be split into 3 main topics as per the above :

-    Setting the scene (10 mins from moderator and Chairperson)

-       Global Vision (30 mins followed by 15 minutes audience participation)

-       Internet Role and Economy challenges and successes delivering SDGs. (60 mins followed by 15 minutes audience participation)

-    How the IGF and other IG organizations/efforts might better support the SDGs; Recommendations (40 mins followed by 15 minutes audience participation, followed by 5 minutes Organizers’ summary)

 

Policy Questions (Suggestions:

 

·   How do we foresee the Information society in 2030 & how it may be different that 2015?

 

·   What are the obstacles for Internet entrepreneurship?

·   What are the barriers for obtaining equality through the Internet?

·   How ICT capacity building is better delivered?

·   What are the best way improve health, education, timely Justice, environment protection, society engagement with the help of the Internet?

·   What are the hurdles to obtaining access to meaningful information from the Internet?

·   What are the barriers to increase the access for the non-connected?

 

·   Are there best practices for the above challenges?

 

·   What regulatory and policy issues needs to be addressed to improve the Eco-System?

 

·   IGF post 2015, Multistakeholderism and supporting the delivery of the SDGs

 

  • Investing in human capital: How to ensure investment in ICT oriented human capital from marginalized communities to young entrepreneurs within a healthy eco-system?

  • Availability of local applications and content: In many countries technology is coming from outside and the applications and content provided might not be localized to the local need or available in local language. Problems range from integrating the local languages into the system, and updating the contents posted on websites, to customized applications catering for local needs. The lack of suitable regulation, and investments eco-system can hinder innovation in content creation and application development. What best ways to promote creation of locally relevant content and applications?

  • Intellectual Property Rights: how can we raise awareness about the importance of protecting IPR for both international and local applications and content, and how can we balance between IPR policies and increased availability and affordability.

·   Of the 17 SDGs, where can Internet based technologies make maximum contribution to ensure rapid achievement of objectives?

·   Implementing Sustainable Development: are we identifying synergies between the SDGs and WSIS Action Lines and practical measures to support their implementation?


Host Country Chair: Mr. Henrique Faulhaber, Director and Founder of Calandra Solutions, Advisor of the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee

 

Moderators:

·       Nermine Elsaadany (Under-Secretary for international Relations - MCIT, Egypt)

·      Joseph Alhadeff (Chair – ICC, Digital Economy Commission & VP Oracle)

 

Panelists:

 

  1. Intergovernmental:

·      Mr. Lenni Montiel; Assistant-Secretary-General for Development – United Nations;

·      Mr. Gary Fowlie; Head of Member State Relations & Intergovernmental Organizations - ITU

·      Ms Lydia Brito; Director of the Office in Montevideo - UNESCO

·      Ms. Michele Woods; Director, Copyright Law Division - WIPO

·      NAME TBD, Director, OECD

 

  1. Government: (expected 4)

·      H.E. Rudiantara, Minister of Communication & Information Technology - Indonesia

·      H.E. Junaid Ahmed Palak- Information and Communication Technology Minister of Bangladesh

·      Ambassador Sepulveda, Deputy Assistant Secretary, U.S. Coordinator for International and Communications Policy at the U.S. Department of State  - U.S.

 

  1. Private Sector (3)

·      Sergio Quiroga da Cunha, Head of Latin America, Ericsson

·      Jimson Olufuye, Chairman – Africa ICT Alliance (AfICTA)

·      Silvia Rabello, President - Rio Film Trade Association

 

  1. Civil Society (2):

·      Sunil Abraham; Executive Director, Centre for Internet and Society -Bangalore-

·      Helani Galpaya; CEO LIRNEasia, an ICT policy and regulation think tank active across emerging Asia and the Pacific.  

·      Mrs. Sally Metwaly- Director of Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship programs, Misr Elkheir Foundation (possible remote participation)

  1. Technical Community & Academia (2):

·   Jari Arkko; Chairman – IETF

·   Raúl L. Katz; Adjunct Professor, Division of Finance and Economics, Columbia Institute of Tele-information

 

Remote moderator/Plan for online interaction:

 

Ø  Elizabeth Thomas-Raynaud; Project Director - BASIS

Also we have two volunteering rapporteurs:

o   Subi Chaturvedi; Founder & Hon. Managing Trustee - Media For Change

o   Ellen Blackler; Vice president – Global Public Policy, Walt Disney Company

 

‘Feeder’ workshops (if applicable) and/or connections with other sessions:

(Workshops related to this Session take place after and thus benefit from this session)


Desired results/output:

·      Identifying challenges to internet economy and ICT enabling SDGs

·      Identifying best practices & successful policies enabling SDGs through Internet.

·      Highlight the importance of the Internet role to sustainable development.

·      Identify how IGF post 2015 would support the SDGs

 

Brief on Linking the session to SDGs / IGF:

Those directly relating to “Internet Economy” and “Enablement” within the 17 SDGs are:

Ø  Internet Economy related:

o   SDG No. 8:  Good Jobs and Economic Growth (promote, sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work for all.)

o   SDG No.9:  Innovation and infrastructure  (build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation)

o   No.11:  Sustainable Communities and Cities (Makes cities and settlements safe, resilient and sustainable)

o   SDG No.17:  Partnership for the Goals  (Strengthen the means of communication and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development)

Ø  Enablement related:

o   SDG No. 4: Quality Education (ensure equitable and quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all)

o   SDG No. 5:  Gender Equality (Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls)

o   SDG No.10: Reduce Inequalities  (reduce inequality within and amongst countries)

There are several others where Internet can play a vital role:

 

Some thoughts on how Internet Economy & Governance serve Sustainable Development :

·      Human Capital

o  Internet Entrepreneurship- (lowers barriers to marketing, new ideas & innovation, stimulating demand without need for expensive assets.)

o…


Wednesday November 11, 2015 09:00 - 12:30
Main Meeting Hall

09:00

Inter-regional dialogue session

1. Title of the Session

Substantive Session:   A Dialogue – Inter Regional and National IGF Initiatives 2015

2. Length

120 minutes

3. Brief Description/Objective

Since its inception as mandated by the Tunis Agenda, a steady growth and expansion of
the IGF has emerged at the national, sub regional and regional levels.  Each year during the IGF itself, the Coordinators and participants in these Initiatives gather to share experiences, and advance the contribution of the national and regional Initiatives into the IGF.   National and Regional Initiatives are bottom up activities that are reflective of the priorities and concerns of each individual initiative; in some regions, both national and sub regional events
occur.  

This session has the following objectives: present the outcome of a Survey undertaken by the Secretariat and a volunteer Survey Working Team; host a mini-WSIS+10 reflection from the National and Regionals that held special sessions during their meetings; review a priority topic, based on the bottom up consultation – Connecting the Next Billion; and discuss
perspectives of strengthening the input and contribution of the national and regional IGF Initiatives from 2015 forward, with a special focus on intersessional work during 2016. 

National and Regional Initiatives cover a wide range of Internet Governance issues that
are of great relevance to the IGF itself, but have a particular unique focus as they reach a very broad range of stakeholders, only a few who also engage and attend the IGF.  Through the Initiatives, the impact and engagement of the multi stakeholder model of the IGF is being reflected in an ever growing reflection at national and regional fora. Thus the interaction and engagement of the Substantive Session for the National and Regional IGF Initiatives is a reflection in two directions – into the IGF itself, and from the IGF back into the Initiatives, through the engagement of the Coordinators and participants from the Initiatives.   The Substantive session also allows a further growth of sharing of practices and views across the Initiatives, helping to spread the awareness and engagement of national governments with their national stakeholders in Internet governance policy areas.

4. Agenda and format

The session has several segments:

Welcome and Setting the Scene for the Session: 
Marilyn Cade, MAG Member and coordinator for planning the Substantive Session

Opening Introductions from Coordinators and Participants – 1 minute per Initiative

Welcoming Remarks:  Chengetai Masango, IGF Secretariat and Janis Karklins, IGF MAG Chair

Introduction of the Co-Facilitators – UNGA as Special Guests - TBC

Main Program: 

1)    Presentation of the Survey Results:
Led by Team Leaders for presentation of Survey Results and Secretariat

2)    WSIS +10 – 2-3 minutes per Initiative
that held sessions on WSIS+10 – Round robin

3)    Connecting the Next Billion – As many of the National and Regional Initiatives made substantive contributions into the Intercessional work, this topic was chosen by the Survey Respondents as a priority for thematic discussion during the Substantive Session  - 3 minutes per Initiative

4)    Reflecting views into the IGF processes and reflecting from the IGF into the National and Regional Initiatives processes

5)    Growing the number of IGF National Initiatives for 2016 and beyond

The Coordinators or a designated speaker from each Initiative will be seated at the table, with additional seating, and a roving microphone available for additional comments.  The participants will be encouraged to engage with Coordinators during the session.

Policy Questions

The Session does not use policy questions per se, but is designed to enable discussions between the Coordinators/designated speakers.

Remote Observation and Participation is invited:

Desired results/output

Building the understanding of the organization and structure and management challenges
of the National and Regional IGF Initiatives.  Highlighting the perspectives from the Initiatives on Connecting the Next Billion, WSIS+10, and the further growth of the number of Initiatives. Identifying further support and activities that can support the engagement and reflection
of views from the National and Regional Initiatives into the IGF, and from the IGF  into the Initiatives



Wednesday November 11, 2015 09:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 8

10:00

WS 131 Commonwealth approach on National Cybersecurity Strategies
The growth of the Cyberspace has touched upon all aspects of life and society. The increasing usage and reliance on Cyberspace, makes the safety, security and resilience of Cyberspace mandatory requirements. Lack of National Cybersecurity strategies may lead countries to take uncoordinated steps which may duplicate activities, prevent maximising resources and generally reduce effectiveness. The Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation, the ICT agency of the Commonwealth, has drafted the Commonwealth approach for developing National Cybersecurity Strategies, to help countries that lack National Cybersecurity Strategies to develop their own national strategies. This model, which has benefitted from the inputs of a range of organisations and experts, has been showcased at regional and national workshops to build the capacity of key stakeholders to use the model for their unique contexts. This workshop is proposed to expand the awareness raising beyond the Commonwealth to the wider community, with a view to assist all countries that need assistance to develop their National Cybersecurity Strategies.

Wednesday November 11, 2015 10:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 3

11:00

WS 167 Unlocking internet economy through copyright reform
Digital technologies and internet have changed the way we experience, engage with and extract value from information goods. The so-called “creative industries” are well positioned to grow in markets where investment in knowledge is a priority, where information and communications technology infrastructure enables new types of value and delivery networks, and where e-commerce is widely adopted by consumers. But for many copyright is increasingly seen as restricting Internet innovation. From this perspective, restrictions are important factors in spurring the emergence of a new type of innovation system in the internet economy that sees multinational corporations, fledgling start-ups, telecommunications providers, content creators and consumers form increasingly complex value chains that defy and contradict the copyright regime.
Unfortunately, much of this debate takes place within an evidence vacuum, despite the obvious need to better understand the role of copyright in incentivising innovation and contributing positively to the economy . There is an urgent need to reflect on current understandings of how can copyright contribute or not to innovation delivering economic value in this new context. Do the rules as they exist in specific countries add to or detract from economic growth? Does the system result in broader economic gains for the many, or has it become a bastion for rent seeking by the few? How copyright reform could be an incentive for economic development in developing countries? We want to use IGF space to discuss copyright reform and internet economy informed by detailed policy analysis - not steered by sectional interests - in order to achieve its function in the digital age.

Wednesday November 11, 2015 11:00 - 12:00
Workshop Room 5

11:00

WS 171 IXPs: Driving connectivity and local economies
Session Organizers
JC

Jane Coffin

Director, Development Strategy, Internet Society
IXPs, connectivity, access, connecting the next billion, development
avatar for Allan MacGillivray

Allan MacGillivray

Policy Advisor, Canadian Internet Registration Authority


Wednesday November 11, 2015 11:00 - 12:00
Workshop Room 2

11:00

11:00

BPF Establishing and supporting Computer Security Incident Response Teams (CSIRTs)
This year, the IGF launched a Best Practices effort on the establishment of CERT teams for Internet Security. Over the last two months, three Lead experts supported by an independent consultant engaged with a community of participants from major stakeholder groups to exchange existing CSIRT development practices and discussed ways to further collaborate. A draft document was developed based on these initial discussions. The topics identified as part of this multi-stakeholder preparatory process will be further discussed and finalized during this 90 minute session. CERT or CSIRT (Computer Security Incident Response Teams) are organizations of information security personnel who aim to address security incidents as they arise, whether at an organizational, pan-organizational or even national level. They follow defined processes, combined with engineering ingenuity, to ensure security incidents are properly identified, contained and remediated. By nature, many incidents have impact beyond the constituency of one CSIRT, and thus teams often partner with other teams, as well as with private sector, government, civil society and the technical community to protect users of the internet. This round table session will cover the various opportunities and challenges involved in the establishment of Computer Emergency Response Teams to improve internet security. Topics to be discussed will include the role of a CSIRT teams in private sector and government, what a “national CSIRT” truly means, and the high level collaboration processes involved in coordinating widespread incidents. As output of this session, a summary document will be published by the IGF, with recommendations and next-steps on topics ripe for further multi-stakeholder debate between the technical community, government, civil society and private sector. The session will be led by lead experts Christine Hoepers (of CERT.br), Adli Wahid and Maarten Van Horenbeeck (of FIRST) and supported by UN consultant Wout De Natris. We strongly invite participants from all stakeholder groups to attend the session and contribute. No technical experience in the CSIRT community is required, though we recommend making yourself familiar with the preparatory document shared on the IGF web site to be prepared for the discussion.

Session Organizers
avatar for Wout de Natris

Wout de Natris

Consultant/owner, De Natris Consult
Apart from organising Workshop #153 'Let's break down silos in cyber security and cyber crime' on behalf of SIDN and NLIGF, you can talk to me about cyber security and SMEs, national and international cooperation and opportunities to build bridges between different silos. I'm interested to hear your views and/or discuss how I can aid you in achieving your goals in establishing cyber security and better prevent cyber crime.



Wednesday November 11, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 6

11:00

WS 68 Can civil society impact Global Internet Governance?
While multistakeholderism model is spreading as an approach for internet policy-making in global/regional/national level, it still faces questions about its effectiveness and limitations. It also impacts in particular civil society participation and raises challenges.

This raises questions about the legitimacy of processes and the value of participation there depending to the structure e.g. ICANN, OECD, CoE. CS can participate in different capacities: observers, experts, full-participation or only during consultation phase.

The workshop is aiming to describe and compare experiences of CS participation in different processes (multistakeholder/multilateral) and fora, and what it achieved or not there in term of policy-making. Those practical experiences will be discussed with other stakeholders representatives and understand how they perceive CS participation.

The roundtable will go from global to national level, drawing best practices, successes and limitations. That will also open a room to highlight common ground between the stakeholders. The workshop is designed to be action-oriented: collecting practices, getting input from participants, then recommendations.

As questions :
1- How do we assess the extent to which civil society succeeded in its participation in the different processes to advance its goals?
2- How can civil society participation be enhanced in practical manners?
3- How can intergovernmental organizations become more responsive to civil society concerns?
4- What lessons can civil society learn from different experiences of other stakeholders? and how to build partnerships with them?
5- How can civil society efforts and possible outcomes at global and regional level can translate into and feed national IG discussions?

Speakers:

  • William Drake, Civil society, Non-commercial Users Constituency,  @wjdrake
  • Baher Esmat, Technical community, ICANN, @baheresmat
  • Deborah Brown, Civil Society, APC, @deblebrown 
  • Susan Chalmers, Technical Community , @susanchalmers
  • Meryem Marzouki, Academia, CNRS & UPMC Sorbonne Universités, @MMPolyTIC
  • Hanene Boujemi, Civil Society, Hivos, @HananeBoujemi 
  • Marianne Franklin, Civil Society, IRP Coalition/Goldsmiths (University of London) , @GloComm
  • Lee Hibbard, Intergovernmental Organization, Council of Europe, @leehibbard
  • Matthew Shears, Civil Society, CDT
  • Anne Carblanc, Intergovernmental Organization, OECD
  • Mongi Marzoug, Private Sector, Orange 
  • Juuso Moisander, Government, Finnish Ministry of foreign affairs, @igfsuomi
  • Canela De Souza Godoi Guilherme, Intergovernmental Organization, UNESCO
Agenda:
  1. Setting the scene : explaining context and objectives behind the roundtable (5min) 
  2. Paper presentation: cases studies & theoretical framework (5min)
  3. Discussants' interventions: going through the questions above and presenting their own experiences (35min) 
  4. Q&A session with the audience, interaction between discussants (35min) 
  5. Wrap-up: recommendations & actions (10min) 
Workshop page: http://cs-netgov.tumblr.com/

Contact: @rafik

Session Organizers
avatar for Rafik Dammak

Rafik Dammak

Non-commercial Stakeholder Group former Chair, NTT
He is engineer working and living in Japan. He is member of the steering committee for the Dynamic Coalition on Internet Rights and Principles . He has been involved in ICANN community as NCUC (Non-commercial users constituency) individual user member, former elected GNSO Councillor for the Non-Commercial Stakeholder Group, ICANN nomcom member in addition to his participation in several ICANN WGs like the new gTLD applicant support where he was... Read More →



Wednesday November 11, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room_10

11:00

WS 125 When Governments Hit ‘Like’ on the ‘War on Terror’
Terrorist attacks in Paris, Tunis and Kenya in 2015 increased the efforts of governments across the globe to prevent terrorist groups, such as the Islamic State, Al-Shabaab or Boko Haram, from using social media to recruit new members, fundraise, and spread their message. In recent months, several countries, including France, UK and Spain, proposed comprehensive anti-terror legislation giving government new surveillance and filtering powers in the online sphere. Other governments might follow suit, as combatting terrorist activity is likely to remain top priority in the coming months. These measures introduced by governments raise considerable human rights concerns, because of their implications to freedom of expression online, the right to privacy and protection from discrimination. The multistakeholder approach is essential to find the right legal and political balance between combatting terrorist activity online and protecting human rights. In this roundtable, experts from governments, civil society, industry and academia will be invited to address three types of measures that gained ground in recent months: 1) Online provisions of recent anti-terrorist laws for example requiring Internet Service Providers to take down terrorist websites without court order. 2) Efforts to encourage ‘counter-speech’: governments and civil society using social media to advance alternative narratives to reduce impact of terrorists online. 3) Proposals to ban end-to-end encryption. The goal of this roundtable is to narrow down and update the debate about freedom of expression online and other human rights. The participants will also help to identify best and worst practices and present them on a form of a report that can be used as a guide for decision-makers. The workshop will begin with short interventions from the following participants: - Joanna Bronowicka, Centre for Internet and Human Rights, European University Viadrina - Anja Mihr, Netherlands Institute of Human Rights, Utrecht University - Frank La Rue, Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Europe - Ephraim Percy Kenyanito, Access Now - Melody Patry, Index on Censorship

Session Organizers
avatar for Joanna Bronowicka

Joanna Bronowicka

Project Coordinator, Centre for Internet and Human Rights



Wednesday November 11, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 1

11:00

WS 145 Cuts Right Across: Consent in the Digital Age
Co-organizers:
Bishakha Datta, Point of View
Anja Kovacs, Internet Democracy Project

Description:
Consent is increasingly emerging as a cross-cutting concept, one that is deeply intertwined with, yet buried beneath key concepts of internet governance: privacy, security and data protection, free speech and expression, human rights and digital trust. 

While consent underpins our digital activities in theory, consent is often not taken, or even violated, in practice. Individuals' personal information and intimate images regularly go viral without their consent. The consent we give as internet users to the terms and conditions of intermediaries is often meaningless. While the Internet has induced a renegotiation of the social contract between states and citizens, revelations such as those made by Edward Snowden indicate that citizens' explicit consent is rarely sought or obtained when the terms of the contract change. In an age when much of our lives is data, consent is essential not just for informational self-determination, or to enable users to freely and safely express themselves, but to foster active citizenship. Without consent, there is no social contract.

This roundtable aims to surface the buried concept of consent and explore its value and significance to strengthen, not only the right to privacy, but human rights online, and what this means for Internet governance in substance and in process. It brings together a variety of actors, each looking at consent through a different lens and explores these questions:
  • What is online meaningful consent in theory and in digital practice? How can we move from towards meaningful consent?

  • How do cyberlaws address the issue of consent?

  • How can foregrounding consent strengthen privacy and other rights of individuals?

  • How can we build an online culture in which consent is respected and self-regulated? How should we regulate digital consent?

  • What can consent in another domain teach us about consent in a digital world?

  • How can foregrounding consent serve efforts to build a more rights-oriented Internet governance across the board?


Panelists:
  • Joana Varon, Coding Rights, Brazil
  • Amelia Andersdotter, MEP, Sweden
  • Jochai Ben-Avie, Mozilla Corporation
  • Danilo Doneda, Faculdade de Direito da Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Brazil
  • Patrick Burton, Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention (CJCP), South Africa
  • Anja Kovacs, Internet Democracy Project, India
  • Bishakha Datta, Point of View, India

Remote Moderator:
  • Jan Moolman, APC 

Session Organizers
avatar for Bishakha Datta

Bishakha Datta

Executive Director, Point of View
Bishakha Datta (@busydot) works on gender, sexuality and digitality, writes and films non-fiction, runs the non-profit Point of View in Mumbai, India, is part of the wikipedia family and serves on several non-profit boards. In all her avatars, Bishakha explores marginal, invisible, silenced points of view - or those considered illegitimate.


Wednesday November 11, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 4

11:00

WS 197 Net Neutrality: Yes, No or Maybe?
Should governments impose specific ex ante rules to govern net neutrality? This panel features two strong advocates on either side of this contentious debate, and three perspectives from the center: advocates of net neutrality who have various concerns about its implementation. Special attention will be paid to the U.S. FCC’s new Open Internet Order as the archetype of net neutrality regulation based on traditional common carrier telecommunications regulation, but the panel will also discuss how the debate over the FCC’s order may influence the debate around the world. The panel will discuss the various flavors of “net neutrality” regulation that have been proposed in the U.S. and elsewhere, and a variety of regulatory models for addressing “net neutrality” concerns.

Wednesday November 11, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 9

11:00

WS 60 Benchmarking ICT companies on digital rights
There has been growing interest over the past few years in civil society efforts to hold ICT companies accountable for their impact on human rights,. All stakeholders including companies have an interest in setting clear industry standards on dimensions of privacy and freedom of expression. To that end, more research and comparative data about different companies’ policies and practices can encourage companies to compete with one another on respect for users’ rights. Given the international scope and complexity of the sector, this task is more than any single organization can fully tackle on a global scale, and it is important to recognize the diversity of goals and perspectives represented by organizations working in this space. The purpose of this roundtable workshop is to bring together a geographically diverse range of NGO’s and researchers to share experiences and perspectives on creating projects to rank or rate ICT companies. The goal is to create a “how to” guide on launching such projects as well as a collaborative network of organizations and researchers. Company and government stakeholders will also provide feedback on how such projects can most effectively influence corporate practice and government policy.

Wednesday November 11, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 7

12:00

WS 141 Law enforcement in a world where encryption is ubiquitous
In light of the Snowden pervasive surveillance disclosures, there appears to be broader and growing interest in the use and the availability of encryption solutions, particularly those that provide end-to-end protection. 

Trusted end-to-end encryption solutions are one of the key tools by which Internet users can protect the confidentiality of their communications in the digital age. They also serve to reinforce user confidence, which is fundamental for a successful digital economy.

At the same time, concerns have been raised by law enforcement and others regarding what impact pervasive use of encryption solutions for Internet traffic might have on their activities. There have even been suggestions to prohibit the use of encryption, to require backdoors for governments, to limit the level of permitted complexity, or otherwise weaken cryptographic standards.

In a post-Snowden era, how do we balance the legitimate security needs of governments to protect their citizens from very real threats - and at the same time allow people to have a level of privacy from government intrusiveness?

Are calls for “legitimate encryption backdoors” technically feasible and/or desirable? 

How can we understand and implement the legal notion of proportionality?

Are law enforcement, national security objectives and Internet users’ legitimate expectations of secure confidential online communications compatible at all?

What effect might pervasive use of encryption solutions have on other objectives, e.g. network management?

In essence, how to reasonably achieve public policy objectives such as law enforcement/national security in a world where encrypted Internet traffic is the norm?

Wednesday November 11, 2015 12:00 - 13:00
Workshop Room 3

12:00

WS 196 Tech-related gender violence x Freedom of Expression
Technology-related Violence Against Women are acts of gender-based violence either committed or aggravated by the use of ICTs.
While there is a growing recognition of the importance of integrating VAW discussions on Internet governance stances, a difficulty is that of dealing with the sometimes seemingly contradictory human rights of freedom of expression and those related to gender protection and emancipation. The issue expresses itself oftentimes in the subject of intermediary liability in terms of third party contents. To use Brazil as an example: in the recently approved Marco Civil da Internet (Internet’s Civil Framework), an exception in the general intermediary liability limitation provides that cases involving unsolicited sexual material should be dealt with speedily. Meanwhile, the Federal Department of Human Rights announced to be monitoring social networks for better tackling with hate speech (gender-based included).
Calls for safer and more open online spaces for women oftentimes raise concerns on the side of Freedom of Expression and Internet Rights community, and finding a common ground to protect these different sets of human rights can be challenging, and involve the polemic subjects of anonymity, monitoring and platforms’ incentives. Making use of research material gathered by APC, InternetLab, Gig@ and UNESCO about tech-based VAW and the FoE, our contribution aims to understand whether and to what extent there is a contradiction between the defense of women rights and that of FoE, and whether moving forward on this is possible. The objective is to frame the subject and promote future conversations.

Panelists:
  • Ana de Freitas - journalist, Nexo, Brazil
  • Bia Barbosa - Intervozes, Brazil
  • Dafne Plou - APC
  • Erika Smith - Take Back the Tech, APC
  • Gabrielle Guillemin - Article19, UK
  • Hibah Hussain - Public Policy Analyst at Google
  • Mariana Valente - InternetLab, Brazil (moderator)
  • Paz Peña - Derechos Digitales, Chile


Session Organizers
avatar for Mariana Valente

Mariana Valente

Director, InternetLab


Wednesday November 11, 2015 12:00 - 13:00
Workshop Room 5

12:00

Open Forum - WIPO
The Internet, new information and communication technologies, and the digital economy present both challenges and opportunities for the international community and the intellectual property (IP) system. How to stimulate innovation and creativity in the digital environment while ensuring an effective and balanced approach to intellectual property rights (IPRs) is one of many key considerations in the discussions of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF). As a specialized agency of the United Nations, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) is engaged in the process of adapting the international IP framework to the evolving needs of the Information Society by addressing many issues related to the intersection between IP and the digital environment at the international level using a multi-stakeholder approach. The WIPO Open Forum will look at WIPO’s programs and activities aimed at assisting Member States to adapt to the fast-evolving digital environment and make a positive contribution to social and economic development. The session will specifically examine WIPO’s work and engagement with Creative Commons (CC) along with other Intergovernmental Organizations (IGOs) to promote greater open access policies as well as to look at WIPO’s activities in the field of software development, including on Open Source and the Video Games Industry.

Speakers
Paolo Lanteri, Copyright Law Division, WIPO
Mr. Ronaldo Lemos, Professor at the Rio de Janeiro State University Law School and Creative Commons Project Lead
Mr. Andy Ramos, Author of the WIPO Study “The Legal Status of Video Games: Comparative Analysis in National Approaches

Moderador: Victor Owade, External Relations Division, WIPO


Wednesday November 11, 2015 12:00 - 13:00
Workshop Room 2

12:30

14:00

WS 52 The Global “Public Interest” in Critical Internet Resources
The draft outcomes document for the WSIS+10 review says that, "We recognize that the Internet is a global resource that must be managed in an open and inclusive manner, which serves the public interest."  The NETmundial Multistakeholder Statement says the “Internet is a global resource which should be managed in the public interest.” Resolutions appended to the ITU’s core treaties say that IP-based networks must be interoperable and globally reachable in the public interest, and that governments must provide a clear legal framework “to ensure adequate protection of public interests in the management of Internet resources, including domain names and addresses.” ICANN’s Bylaws and Affirmation of Commitments employ the term three and five times, respectively. ICANN’s GAC has invoked the term to justify some of its positions, and applicants for new gTLDs are asked to undertake Public Interest Commitments. But what does the “public interest” really mean with respect to critical Internet resources? There has been no collective effort to clarify the standard to be followed. ICANN’s new Strategic Plan prioritizes developing ”a common consensus based definition of public interest” for the organization; could a broader, parallel public discussion be helpful?

This Roundtable will explore such questions as:
• At the national level, the term has been used in fields like telecommunications and broadcasting to promote universal connectivity, stability, competition, and diversity. Are these or similar goals relevant for global Internet governance?
• If it proves impossible to agree a robust definition, can we at least sharpen the focus by identifying actions that do/not seem broadly consistent?
• Would trying to define the term be chimeric, and set off interest-based negotiations? Should we simply use it as a vague aspiration, or desist in using it?

Moderator:

William Drake, University of Zurich / Noncommercial Users Constituency, ICANN 

Participants:

Rinalia Abdul Rahim, Compass Rose Sdn Bhd, Malaysia 

Jari Arkko, IETF Chair, Finland

Olga Cavalli, Government of Argentina

Vint Cerf, Google, USA

Anriette Esterhuysen, Association for Progressive Communications, South Africa

Amb. Benedicto Fonseca Filho, Ministry of External Relations, Brazil 

Jeanette Hofmann, The Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society, Germany

Tarek Kamel, ICANN, Switzerland

Wolfgang Kleinwachter, European Summer School on Internet Governance, Germany

Marília Maciel, Rio de Janeiro Law School, Getulio Vargas Foundation, Brazil

Nii Quaynor, University of Cape-Coast, Ghana 

George Sadowsky, ICANN Board of Directors, USA

Asst. Sec. Lawrence Strickling, Department of Commerce, USA 

Thomas Schneider, Federal Office of Communication, Switzerland

 Remote Moderator:

Grace Githaiga, Kenya ICT Action Network (KICTANet)

Rapporteur:

Stefania Milan, Tilburg University, the Netherlands



Session Organizers
avatar for William Drake

William Drake

International Fellow & Lecturer, University of Zurich
International Fellow and Lecturer, Institute of Mass Communication and Media Research, University of Zurich; Chair, NonCommercial Users Constituency, and member of the Nominating Committee, in ICANN; member, Coordination Committee of NETmundial Initiative; core faculty member, European and South schools on Internet governance; advisor to the World Economic Forum’s Future of the Internet Initiative; member of the Advisory Group of the Global... Read More →


Wednesday November 11, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 1

14:00

WS 111 Understanding Effective Cyber Security Capacity Building
With the rapid expansion of the Internet and technological advancements, the need for more effective Cyber Security capacity building becomes increasingly essential. Increased technological advancements do yield an essential need for more cyber security, but the need for capacity building is not directly known. 

The Global Cyber Security Capacity Centre, University of Oxford was established to improve the impact, scale, and pace of Cyber Security capacity building. The Centre, through broad consultation with over 200 international experts, developed a model to measure the maturity of cyber security capacity across the world. The Model addresses Cyber Security through a comprehensive consideration, composed of 5 distinct areas of cyber security capacity: National Strategy and Policy, Cyber Security Mind-set, Cyber Security Education and Training, Legal and Regulatory Capacity, and Technical Capacity. It seeks to inform the thinking of policy-makers across the world. 

In an effort to minimise duplication, the Centre has worked closely with the Organization of American States - regional focus on Latin America and the Caribbean; and the World Bank, - a focus on Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Asia. Additional cooperation agreements will be in place by November 2015 but cannot be reflected at the time of writing. 

The purpose of this roundtable is to provide an overview of the Centre’s Maturity Model, and lessons learnt through its application in the Caribbean, South America, Eastern Europe, The Caucasus and Asia. Discussion will address the current landscape of Cyber Security Capacity, as understood by the Centre, and seek to identify innovative approaches to address gaps across regions.

Wednesday November 11, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 4

14:00

WS 160 Managing security risks for sustainable development

Recent large scale security incidents (Target, Home Depot, Anthem, Sony Pictures, etc.) have demonstrated that “cybersecurity” is not just a technical matter for experts, but that it should be also a priority for government leadership and top executives (across all economic sectors), as well as for individuals. 

Many leaders and decision makers in businesses and in governments are realising that while the digital environment is a driver for innovation, productivity and growth, it also introduces risks that can jeopardise economic and social prosperity. For example, digital security attacks can alter production and undermine companies’ reputation; intrusions can be performed to steal trade secrets, and damage growth; personal data breaches can violate the lives of millions, facilitate identity theft and related financial fraud. 
This workshop will bring representatives of governments, businesses and civil society together to explore the following questions: 

  • What does “cybersecurity” mean when it is approached from an economic and social perspective? In particular, what does this mean for companies and government agencies? What does risk management mean in this context?
  • What does it really mean and imply for leaders and decision makers in governments and businesses to approach the digital environment both from the perspective of the opportunities it offers and the risks it can pose? 
  • What are the cultural and governance challenges in businesses? Are there specific challenges for SMEs?
  • How can communities better understand each other to work together towards a better management of digital security risk? 
  • What are the consequences in terms of broader Internet governance? 
  • How is “cybersecurity” governance impacting policies concerning Internet use?


Link to the Digital Security Risk Management Recommendation and Companion Document

http://oe.cd/dsrm

Names of participants

  • Laurent Bernat
  • Intergovernmental Organisation
  • OECD
  • Cybersecurity and privacy expert

  • Danil Kirimi
  • Private Sector
  • WEF
  • Experience in Internet governance discussions and unique perspective on the global private sector

 

  • Aaron Martin
  • Private Sector
  • JP Morgan Chase
  • Cybersecurity expert in a leading company from an industry not primarily ICT-based

 

  • Flávia Lefrève
  • Civil Society
  • CGI.br’s Civil Society Representative
  • Experienced lawyer and representative of civil society in many multistakeholder instances in Brazil

 

  • Cristine Hoepers
  • Technical Community
  • Senior Security Analyst and General Manager of CERT.br
  • Expert in incident management and with extense knowledge of the concrete challenges in training and fostering awareness on cybersecurity

Name of in-person Moderator: Nicolas Seidler (ISOC)

Name of Remote Moderator: Lorrayne Porciuncula (OECD)

Agenda
  1. Moderator's introduction (5 min.)
  2. Short introduction by each panellist on their particular angle and general views on the topic.
  3. Questions by th emoderator to the panellist and interaction with the audience (50 min.)
  4. Conclusion and final closing remarks (10 min.)

Session Organizers
avatar for Lorrayne Porciuncula

Lorrayne Porciuncula

Internet Economist / Policy Analyst, OECD
Lorrayne Porciuncula is an Economist/ Policy Analyst at the Digital Economy and Policy Division (CDEP) of the Directorate Science, Technology and Innovation in the OECD. Lorrayne works on the OECD-IDB Broadband Policy Toolkit for Latin America and the Caribbean that aims to situate policy recommendations to the specific regional and local contexts. Previous to her current position, Lorrayne has worked as an economic analyst in the International... Read More →



Wednesday November 11, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 5

14:00

WS 6 Child Online Protection through Multistakeholder Engagement
Description of the workshop:

Internet expanded aggressively into homes in rural areas and gadgets used by children. Children access a variety of online content more easily, meanwhile e-literacy advocacy is often overlooked, thus they  become more vulnerable! This workshop is to share experiences among the participants, including you, on how the  child online protection should and can be done by a multi-stakeholder approach. Join us!


Key Participants (alphabetical order):

  • Barata, Mariam F, Mrs (Directorate General Secretary, Indonesia Ministry of Communication and Technology - kominfo.go.id)
  • Carr, John, Mr (Senior Expert Advisor, ECPAT International - ecpat.net)
  • Pancini, Marco, Mr (European Senior Policy Cousel,Google - google.com)
  • Saidalavi, Mohamed M, Mr (Chief Executive Officer, Developing Internet Safe Community Foundation, Dubai -  discfoundation.com)
  • Moderator: Laksmi, Shita, Mrs (Program Development Manager, HIVOS Southeast Asia - sea.hivos.org)
  • Remote Moderator: Poetranto, Irene, Mrs (Researcher, Citizen Lab of Toronto University - citizenlab.org)
  • Rapporteur: Haristya, Sherly, Mrs (Researcher, Nanyang Technological University,  Singapore - ntu.edu.sg)

 

Also supported by: Indonesia Child Online Protection (ID-COP) and ICT Watch - Indonesia.

 

Original proposal and workshop report: https://www.intgovforum.org/cms/wks2015/index.php/proposal/view_public/6

Full transcript: http://www.intgovforum.org/cms/187-igf-2015/transcripts-igf-2015/2346-2015-11-11-ws-6-child-online-protection-through-multistakeholder-engagement-workshop-room-10

Full video documentation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gd44GESpHRA

Photos:

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Session Organizers
avatar for donny b.u

donny b.u

Executive Director, ICT Watch - Indonesia



Wednesday November 11, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room_10

14:00

Dynamic Coalition on Core Internet Values
Meeting of the Dynamic Coalition on Core Internet Values during IGF 2015, Brazil

Wednesday, November 11 • 14:00 ­ 15:30

Workshop Room 3

The sixth annual meeting of the IGF Dynamic Coalition on Core Internet Values will have a panel discussion on the theme "Core Internet Values as a Reference Standard for Global Internet Policy". This would be to discuss the thought that the organizations responsible for components of Internet Governance including large Internet Organizations, Governments and Civil Society organizations could formulate/contribute to formulate Internet policy in a manner that the Internet does not slip away from Core Internet Values. Format of the Session The session would follow the pattern of a panel presentation followed by a discussion.

Panel 

Kathryn Brown, President and CEO of the Internet Society
Paul Wilson, Director General of APNIC
Erica Mann, Member, Board of Directors, ICANN
Carlton Anthony Samuels, former Member of the At-Large Advisory Committee
Mark Carvell, Representative of the United Kingdom at the Governmental Advisory Committee of ICANN
Olivier Crepin Le-Blond, Past Chair of the ICANN At-Large Advisory Committee  (Chair)

Session Organizers
avatar for Sivasubramanian Muthusamy

Sivasubramanian Muthusamy

President, Internet Society India Chennai
President Internet Society India Chennai | http://www.circleid.com/members/3601 LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/sivasubramanianmuthusamy Twitter: http://twitter.com/shivaindia Google+: isolatednhttp://coreinternetvalues.org


Wednesday November 11, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 3

14:00

Dynamic Coalition on Platform Responsibility

Annual Meeting of the Dynamic Coalition on Platform responsibility 

12 November, 14:00-15:30, Room 6 

The digital environment is characterised by ubiquitous intermediation: most of the actions we take on the web are enabled, controlled or otherwise regulated through the operation of online platforms. Increasingly, the operation of these platforms affects individuals’ ability to develop their own personality and engage in a substantial amount of social interactions.

In light of the key role that online platforms are playing in shaping a global information society and the significant impact they have on the exercise of the rights of Internet users, an expectation exists that such entities behave “responsibly”, thus refraining from the violation of internationally recognised human rights standards and offering effective remedies aimed at repairing the negative consequences that their activities may have on users’ rights.

The Annual Meeting of the Dynamic Coalition on Platform Responsibility (DCPR) will explore the role of online platforms in the Internet ecosystem and their responsibility to respect human rights. Importantly, all participants will have the possibility to discuss the Recommendations on Terms of Service and Human Rights, elaborated by the DCPR, focusing on the most concrete and tangible means for online platforms to bring their responsibility to bear.

Meeting Agenda

-        Introductory keynotes:

  • Joe Cannataci, UN Special Rapporteur for Privacy
  • Benoit Thieulin, President of the French Digital Council

 

-        Presentation of the Recommendations on Terms of Service and Human Rights

  • Luca Belli, Center for Technology and Society at Fundação Getulio Vargas;
  • Nicolo Zingales , Tilburg Law School
  • o   Primavera De Filippi, Université Paris 2 & Berkman Center 

 

-        High Level panel Discussion with;

  • Patrick Penninckx, Council of Europe Information Society Department
  • Flávia Lefèvre Guimarães, Proteste & Comitê Gestor da Internet CGI.br
  • Veridiana Alimonti, Intervozes
  • Marcel Leonardi, Google, TBC

 

-        Open debate

Interactive moderation by Luca Belli, Nicolo Zingales & Primavera De Filippi

 


Wednesday November 11, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 6

14:00

WS 30 Multistakeholder practices enabling sustainable development
Multistakeholder processes aim to bring together representatives from different sectors, including business, civil society, government, and others, to address a challenge at hand. There have been many examples of successful multistakeholder processes in addressing a range of the sustainable development goals (e.g., addressing healthcare or other humanitarian crises, delivering education to remote areas, creating mobile payment schemes), developing policy framework principles, and improving public services. 

In this roundtable, speakers with practical experience are invited to share specific examples of multistakeholder practices, identify challenges that need to be overcome, and how they were resolved. The roundtable will summarize the examples discussed to present concrete evidence of the viability of multistakeholder practices in addressing sustainable development goals, and provide further support for IGF mandate renewal in the WSIS+10 review.

Wednesday November 11, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 9

14:00

WS 152 Political dissent & online anonymity in developing countries
This roundtable is aimed to go in depth into one of the most controversial topics regarding internet and human rights: how the right to protest and assembly can be affected by surveillance and legal bans to online anonymity in developing countries.

Different online platforms has enabled not just the free expression of internet users, but also has simplified the way citizens can organize protests both online and offline and communicate in order to political dissent. In this context, to preserve anonymity can be fundamental.

However, mass surveillance by states, data retention laws, personal data collection by companies, legal bans on anonymity and threats to encryption online, seem to put a name and a face to every online move. Anonymity is either impossible, or at least strongly compromised.

In this environment of mass identification, is it possible to have truly right to protest and assembly?

From a multi-stakeholder approach, this roundtable will try to understand the actual state of online anonymity and how current legal and technical frameworks and the internet governance frames are facing the challenges of online dissent in developing countries.

Additionally, the roundtable will present different perspectives regarding online anonymity and the protection of privacy, from governments, private sector, technical community and civil society, trying to address which are the responsibilities each one of them has in terms of protect the right to protest and assembly in a convulsed world.

============================================================

Confirmed panelists:

David Kaye, UN Special Rapporteur on freedom of opinion & expression
Pedro Less, Director Government Affairs & Public Policy Latin America at Google
Joana Varón, executive director at Coding Rights, Brasil
Zoya Rehman, Bytes For All, Pakistan
Leila Nachawati, Communications and Information Policy Program at APC

============================================================

Session Organizers
avatar for Paz Pena

Paz Pena

Advocacy Director, Derechos Digitales
avatar for Claudio Ruiz

Claudio Ruiz

Executive Director, Derechos Digitales


Wednesday November 11, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 7

14:00

WS 207 Economics of Global Internet Deployment
Maximizing Internet access has been widely accepted as a vital objective across the ideological spectrum. But how can universal deployment be funded and how can service be made affordable to all? This panel complements a related panel on zero-rating plans but offers a broader perspective on promoting infrastructure investment and will explore a range of questions, including: Where are markets failing to provide Internet access — and why? What can governments do to encourage investment? What barriers discourage investment in both wireless and wireline service, and in the backbones that connect both? Can new satellite-based services and mobile technologies change the equation? What role do “edge” providers of content and services play directly infrastructure investment? What indirect role do they play in driving Internet adoption, and thus helping Internet access providers achieve necessary economies of scale? Which aspects of Internet access might be natural monopolies? How much competition can we expect in others? What is the connection between network regulation and investment? What paradigms will best protect consumers while also driving investment in faster networks? How can regulators best ensure the affordability of broadband service? Do we need to replace traditional universal service paradigms of forcing service providers to cross-subsidize unprofitable consumers or areas? Might direct subsidies or other market-based incentives be more effective? How much of the adoption problem is actually related to price rather than digital literacy and perceived relevance?

Wednesday November 11, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 8

14:00

14:00

IGF Intersessional Work: Policy Options and Best Practices for Connecting the Next Billion
Report: http://www.intgovforum.org/cms/documents/igf-meeting/igf-2015-joao-pessoa/igf2015-reports/610-igf2015policy-options-and-best-practices-for-connecting-the-next-billion

The purpose of this main session on ‘Policy Options and Best Practices for Connecting the Next Billion’ is to bring the IGF community together in a roundtable format for an interactive and output-oriented discussion which will review the work of some of the main inter-sessional activities of 2015 including the collaborative ‘Policy Options for Connecting the Next Billion’ compilation report and the six Best Practice Forum’s. The session will gather those from the community who have made great contributions to the inter-sessional work, including representatives from National and Regional IGF initiatives, and representatives from all stakeholder group’s, to identify both challenges and potential solutions for bringing the next billion global citizens online. A report produced by the UN General Assembly Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) Working Group on Improvements to the IGF called for the development of more tangible outputs to ‘enhance the impact of the IGF on global Internet governance and policy’. To enrich the potential for IGF outputs, the IGF Multistakeholder Advisory Group (MAG) developed an intersessional programme intended to complement other IGF activities, such as national and regional IGF initiatives, dynamic coalitions, and best practice forums (BPFs). The outputs from this programme are intended to become robust resources, to serve as inputs into other pertinent forums, and to evolve and grow over time.  The topic “Policy Options for Connecting the Next Billion” was chosen for the 2015 intersessional work after an earlier public consultation during the preparatory process for IGF 2015.  In order to continue the valuable intersessional work, a theme for the 2016 IGF programme of activities is expected to be determined during/immediately following the next IGF in November 2015 by the global IGF community, pending the renewal of the IGF mandate by the United Nations General Assembly at the end of the year. The theme is intended to reflect topical issues and to increase support to national and regional IGF initiatives, dynamic coalitions, and BPFs.  The draft IGF 2015 Policy Options for Connecting the Next Billion are available here: http://www.intgovforum.org/cms/policy-options-for-connection-the-next-billion/cnb-outdocs Theme: Policy Options for Connecting the Next Billion Technological advancement in connectivity has expanded broadband access and mobile penetration in recent years. Three billion people were connected to the Internet by the end of 2014. In spite of the progress achieved, more effort is necessary in order to connect the next billion and to address the digital divide.  The identification of strategies to improve connectivity is timely due to the ongoing process of reviewing the outcomes of the World Summit of the Information Society (WSIS+10) and recent discussions of the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).  The newly adopted United Nations Sustainable Development Agenda also recognizes that ICTs are a crucial platform for the implementation of these visionary goals and the Agenda sets an ambitious goal to "significantly increase access to information and communications technology and strive to provide universal and affordable access to the Internet in least developed countries by 2020". Collaboration between governmental and non-governmental actors is key to meet this challenge and the mutistakeholder nature of the IGF makes it a privileged space for discussion.  Examples of policy questions addressed throughout the preparatory process of the ‘Connecting the Next Billion’ exercise: 1. How would you define the issue “Connecting the Next Billion”? 2. Have you observed any regional or national specificities regarding connectivity (e.g. Internet industry development)? 3. Do you know of existing policy measures, and private sector or civil society initiatives addressing connectivity? If yes, was the policy a government policy, industry policy (either collective best practice or corporate policy), technical policy, or did it pertain to civil society collaboration? Describe them. 4. In your opinion, what worked well in the development of the policy, and what impediments were encountered? 5. What was the experience with implementation? 6. Did you experience any unintended consequences of policy developments/interventions, good and bad? 7. Can you think of unresolved issues where further multistakeholder cooperation is needed? 8. Did you gain any insight as a result of the experience? 9. List proposed steps for further multistakeholder dialogue/actions. Host Country Chair: Mr. Maximiliano Martinhão, Secretary of Telecommunications, Ministry of Communications of Brazil   Moderator(s): H.E. Benedicto Fonseca (Brazil) and Constance Bommelaer (ISOC) Panelists and agenda: High-Level Remarks – Lenni Montiel, UN Assistant Secretary-General for Economic Development in the Department of Economic and Social Affairs – 5 min Welcome and Introduction – Constance Bommelaer, Senior Director, ISOC and H. E. Benedicto Fonseca, Brazil - 10 min • The importance of strengthening the IGF • IGF issues and the broader context: Sustainable Development Summit, WSIS+10, etc. • Types of outcomes: Policy Options, Best Practices, methodology and post-2015 perspectives Defining the issue – Dr. Pepper, Vice President, Global Technology Policy, Cisco 10 min • What does Connecting the Next Billion entail? • Why is this issue important and what are the challenges? Policy Options for Connecting the Next Billion • Overview of the complete findings – Brian Gutterman, Assistant Programme Manager, IGF Secretariat – 10 min • Pointer to short synthesis • Perspectives from the regions, i.e. regional/national IGFs - Lee Hibbard, Head of Information Society Unit, Council of Europe and Makane Faye, Chief, Knowledge Management and Library Services, UNECA (10 min) • Call for representatives of national/regional IGF leaders and other contributors/participants to weigh in – 30 min o open to all volunteers: Avri Doria, APC; Carolyn Nguyen, Technology Policy ad Strategy, Microsoft; Alice Siu, Stanford; Tomas Lamanauskas, Head, Corporate Strategy, ITU; Manu K. Bhardwaj US State Department, Jack Deasy, O3B Networks, etc. IGF Best Practices and how they help Connect the Next Billion - 60 min. • Leaders of IGF Best Practices report on outcome of their work, its importance in Connecting the Next Billion, and proposed next steps for IGF work: o Multistakeholder mechanisms - Avri Doria, APC o Establishing CSIRTs - Cristine Hoepers, General Manager, CERT.br/NIC.br o Mitigatin Spam - Julia Cornwell McKean, Manager, eSafety Commission, Australia o Enabling IPv6 - Izumi Okutani, Policy Liaison JPNIC and Susan Chalmers o Establishing successful IXPs – Malcom Hutty, Head of Public Affairs (tbc), Lynx, and Jane Coffin, Director, ISOC o Countering abuse against women online - Jac Kee, Wome’s Rights Policy Coordinator, APC and Subi Chatuverdi, Adjunct Faculty and DGM Corporate Communications • Question to the audience - Which Best Practices should be developed going forward, how they would be relevant to Connect the Next Billion? The way forward – Vint Cerf, Father of the Internet 10 min • What are the emerging trends/challenges to Connect the Next Billion? • How can the IGF catalyze global initiatives • What should be the role of the IGF in tackling issues and how should its community continue to shape its outputs in a relevant and useful way? • Q&A with the audience Conclusion – H.E. Benedicto Fonseca, Brazil (5 min) Remote moderator: Raquel Gatto, Regional Policy Manager, ISOC Feeder workshops: • 6 Best Practices Forums • Dynamic Coalitions • SD Main Session • IGF workshops

Wednesday November 11, 2015 14:00 - 17:30
Main Meeting Hall

16:00

WS 195 Hancel: a mobile tool for safety of journalists
Journalists face different risks. According the NGO Reporters without borders, 69 journalists were killed during 2014. Moreover, the precariousness of privacy online is a subject that increases the risk of journalists to be victims of restraints or physical attacks.

Based on these, FLIP, a free press NGO from Colombia, with the cooperation of Karisma, other colombian NGO, focused in digital rights, in order to enhance a first version of an app developed in México with previous support from FLIP.

Hancel was originally a mobile app that worked as a “panic button” that notifies selected contacts when a journalist feels in danger. New features improve and enhance this tool: trace the movements of the journalists when they perceive that they may need to keep a track of their displacements; encrypted calls and messages; and a survey to measure the journalist level of risk on digital environments to match with digital security recommendations.

Hancel was born in Colombia and México, but it can be used in the entire world, where journalists face continuous and changeable sorts of dangers. The Flash Session will address the needs of journalists and how the use of tools such as Hancel can improve their safety. 

Hancel is a project related to privacy, freedom of press, journalism and the chance that technology gives for the exercise of rights in digital environments. It is an example about taking internet as a tool for facing governance challenges more than theoretical debates about freedom of expression or privacy on internet.

Wednesday November 11, 2015 16:00 - 16:30
Workshop Room 3

16:00

16:00

WS 194 IPv6 Transition up to date
Since 2015 the trends are indicating that the adoption of IPv6 seems to be a more realistic global scenario for the coming years. Not only due to the latest polls but also based on the exhaustion of IANA IPv4 Pool at ARIN, APNIC, LACNIC and RIPE NCC are suggesting to approach a more significant deployment of IPv6. Part of the goal for RIRs and their communities include to help this deployment to be done in the right way and based on current best practices. This session considers inviting different sectors, not only operators, that have implemented IPv6 in their networks (or promoted implementation) and share best practices and experiences from their different perspectives. Best practices are not only provided by information exchange but also by the possibility of different stakeholder views to exchange their visions, dilemmas and challenges on the transition. This workshop will also be a good opportunity for analyzing the importance of a globally coordinated and regionally managed administration of Internet number resources, the future management of the IPv4 address space. The last instance where a similar type of workshop took place at an IGFwas 2012: http://www.intgovforum.org/cms/component/content/article?id=1035:igf-2012-workshop-proposal--no-99-moving-to-ipv6-challenges-for-internet-governance. This time we will look at changes in the ecosystem since that time and future trends.

Wednesday November 11, 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room 1

16:00

WS 28 Multistakeholder Solutions for Youth-Produced Sexual Content
A 13-year-old female in South Africa uploads a sexually explicit “selfie” to someone posing as an online “friend.” Within minutes her trust and privacy are violated as the image is published on websites worldwide. Sound outrageous? It is - and it happens every day.

How can the multistakeholder community come together to help solve this problem? How do we overcome IG challenges such as cross-border jurisdictions and varying degrees of privacy and freedom of expression protections? How do we educate and encourage responsible use of new technologies to avoid this type of behavior? And, if sensitive content is shared beyond the immediate parties, are there other mitigations? 

The Internet Watch Foundation will present the results of an in-depth research effort into this problem. A team of discussants will lead the audience through a multidisciplinary problems solving session. A draft outline of the session:

1) 15-minute overview of study - IWF
2) 60 minutes of free-flowing dialogue and discussion addressing the problem
3) 15 minutes of summary

Not only will we draw on the expertise and experience of the discussants, we anticipate a highly participatory session that engages the experience of audience members, potentially including youth, and takes advantage of the track record of best practices developed at the IGF in Istanbul for Child Online Protection.

At the end of the session, we anticipate an outcome document that includes a roadmap of solutions to explore in combating the increasingly common problem of self-produced sexual images and videos among children and youth.

Wednesday November 11, 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room 5

16:00

16:00

WS 142 Cases on the right to be forgotten, what have we learned?
Since the EU Court of Justice ruled to uphold and codify the Right to Be Forgotten, Free expression activists fear that the decision will open the door to corporate and government censorship. However and apart from the European case, how much do we know from the rest of the world? It is part of a cross-workshop collaboration with Workshop 31 that look at the procedural and legal implications of such rulings. 

In a conversational format, the roundtable seek to understand arguments, scope, discussions and current situation of the Right to be Forgotten outside the EU and around the world in rulings and legislations (enacted and proposed).

The round table will start with kick off presentations (3 minutes) of cases by local activists, such as

Mexican data authority IFAI fine to Google 
Colombian Court case against El Tiempo and ultimately Google
Chilean bill intended to modify the Data Protection Act
Legislation in Nicaragua codifying the ‘right to be forgotten’
Japan's court case against Google
South Korean analysis process to adopt the ‘right to be forgotten’

After those presentations, participants will be divided into groups to be facilitated by the speakers. These groups will discuss and note problems, challenges and enabling environments on the cases in order to draw some “lessons learned”. The full group will reconvene on the roundtable format to detect particularities of the debate beyond EU and will present, discuss and define 10 lessons that can be drawn from these experiences to protect freedom of expression in these debates.

Wednesday November 11, 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room 9

16:00

WS 225 Terms of Service as Cyber-Regulation
We live in an increasingly global and interconnected world. Given the global reach of the majority of the services provided on the web, online platforms seek through their terms of 
service (ToS) to limit their potential liability under the “law of the land” and enforce an otherwise homogeneous set of rules across multiple jurisdictions. Hence, it is often argued that these companies effectively play the role of cyberspace regulators due to their capability to (a) define rules the rules of the platform; (b) define alternative dispute resolution (ADR) mechanisms; and © enforce the platform rules and the results of the ADR .

This workshop will explore the following questions:
- 1) To what extent can the contractual agreements circumvent the mechanisms of protection of fundamental rights and consumer protection built into the various national laws?
- 2) How can we ensure that the “law of the platform” achieves a sufficient level of clarity and intelligibility ? 
- 3) What should be the role of (inter)governmental actors, users and civil society in the development of platform rules ?
- 4) Can interoperability across different regimes be encouraged through the use of this regulatory tool?

Wednesday November 11, 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room 2

16:00

WS 53 The Politics of Encryption
Encryption is a basic building block of trust on the Internet. It is needed to ensure freedom of speech, privacy and to facilitate e-commerce. Encryption ranges along a continuum from no encryption at all to unbreakable encryption with no backdoors. Technology, politics and public sentiment all factor in to determine the appropriate or socially optimal level of online encryption. This balance is not static, either over time or across countries. Often, technological moves toward high levels of encryption generate higher efforts to break encryption by state agencies, cueing off a proverbial “crypto war”. Likewise, extreme political positions either in favour or against encryption generate their opposite. These trends raise several questions that this panel will address: What is the appropriate balance of encryption online? How should the systems of Internet governance respond to changing levels of demand and supply of encryption? After the Snowden disclosures, what protocol design approaches are needed to bring trust back into the system? This panel will bring together experts from private business, government, technologists and civil society to discuss the politics of encryption. The intended outcome of this panel is to develop a forward looking perspective on the encryption debate. Given where we are, how can we move forward and what is the appropriate direction?

Wednesday November 11, 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room 7

16:00

WS 263 Digital economy in LATAM and its sustainable development
Latin America has been one of the few regions where the last financial crisis has not impacted with the same strength as it has done, for example, in Europe. However, experts predict that the economic boom of the last years, mostly based on the favorable environment for the raw materials markets, will slow down. Digital Economy offers opportunities for growth in new areas, acting as a substitute of traditional economic activities.
The potential of the Digital Economy as an engine for sustainable development has been analyzed and demonstrated in a large number of studies. However this potential is not always unleashed in its full dimension due to a series of factors. The aim of this workshop is to individuate and analyze, from multiple perspectives, what kind of barriers are stopping or slowing down the delivery of the positive outcomes of the Digital Economy in Latin America. As a concrete outcome, this workshop will try to propose a number of policy recommendations for all interested parties.

Wednesday November 11, 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room 4

16:00

Global Forum on Cyber Expertise (GFCE)
The Global Forum on Cyber Expertise was launched on April 16th, 2015 during the Global Conference on CyberSpace (GCCS2015) in The Hague by 42 governments, intergovernmental organizations and companies. The establishment of the GFCE was one of the main outcomes of the GCCS2015. Since then, the GFCE has expanded to 50 members and is continuously growing.

During the IGF workshop, participants will be provided information on:

• The structure of the GFCE
• The goals of the GFCE
• The activities and initiatives of the GFCE
• Participation

More information on the GFCE can be found on the website www.thegfce.com

Wednesday November 11, 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room 8

16:30

Open Forum - Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights & the Council of Europe - "Right to Privacy in the Digital Age"
Open Forum on the Right to Privacy in The Digital Age

Co-Organizers

Mr Lee Hibbard - Council of Europe

Mr Hernán E. Vales Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

Description

New technologies are vulnerable to electronic surveillance and interception, which in the words of the High Commissioner for Human Rights has become “a dangerous habit rather than an exceptional measure”. In December 2013, the UN General Assembly adopted res 68/167, which expressed deep concern at the negative impact of surveillance and interception of communications on human rights. In December 2014, the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights raised concerns on inter alia the monitoring of individuals and groups with emphasis on intelligence and prevention. In March 2015, following a new UN General Assembly resolution (69/166) , the Human Rights Council created a Special rapporteur on the right to privacy. In April 2015, the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe stated it was “deeply worried” about the mass surveillance practices by certain intelligence agencies .

This Open Forum will discuss the following questions:

(1) What is the state of play regarding mass surveillance?; 
(2) What progress has been made by governments, the private sector, and civil society?; 
(3) Next steps for privacy, what are the plans fo teh UN Special Rapporteur and the Council of Europe?. 

Participants

Mr Joe Cannataci - UN Special Rapporteur on the right to privacy
Mr Guenter Schirmer - Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe
Mr Alexandre Ghisleni - Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Brazil
Ms Carly Nyst - Independent Human Rights Consultant, The Netherlands
Mr Gbenga Sesan -Paradigm Initiative, Nigeria 

Moderators
Mr Lee Hibbard - Council of Europe
Mr Hernán E. Vales- Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

Wrap-up
Ms Lorena Jaume-Palasi - European Dialogue on Internet Governance

Remote moderator
Ms Emilar Vushe - Association for Progressive Communications

Background documents
United Nations General Assembly, resolution 69/166 on the right to privacy in the digital age
United Nations Human Rights Council, resolution 28/16 on the right to privacy in the digital age
United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, report on the right to privacy in the digital age
PACE resolution 2045 (2015) 

PACE recommendation 2067 (2015)
Report of the PACE Committee on Legal Affairs and Human Rights, Rapporteur: Mr Pieter Omtzigt

This Open Forum is part of a cross-event collaboration with a pre-event on "Privacy in the digital age" (Nov 9, 15 hs) and with WS 114 on "Implementing Core Principles in the Digital Age" (Nov 10, 11 hs) which also look at issues of privacy and surveillance. 

Session Organizers
LH

Lee Hibbard

Council of Europe



Wednesday November 11, 2015 16:30 - 17:30
Workshop Room 3

17:00

WS 239 Bitcoin, Blockchain and Beyond: FLASH HELP!
The core innovation of the Bitcoin cryptographic protocol was the 'blockchain': a practical implementation of a new kind of 'trustless trust technology'. 

The Blockchain is a decentralised, public ledger that secures trust on a trustless Internet and enables the practical development of new decentralised governance structures that have captured the imagination of Silicon Valley and Civil Society alike. 

Recent industry investments in this space are encouraging (e.g. USD$116 million in 21 Inc., USD$21 million in Blockstream.com etc.) and emerging decentralised applications platforms, like Counterparty and Ethereum, stand to power new forms of 'smart contracts'. Via their ADEPT architecture, well-known companies such as IBM and Samsung, are exploring how these technologies can be used to scale the Internet of Things (IoT) to billions of interconnected devices and sensors.

But what about privacy? Has the industry, and its fascination with this new technology, gotten too far ahead of policy? Some think so! 

To help remedy this policy-technology gap, this highly interactive 'flash session' provides policy makers with a rudimentary understanding of the technology, the opportunity and the emerging 'Lex Cryptographia' regime. [See Paper attached] 

Session Organizers
avatar for Primavera de Filippi

Primavera de Filippi

CNRS / Harvard / Backfeed
Primavera De Filippi is a postdoctoral researcher at the CERSA / CNRS / Université Paris II (Panthéon-Assas). She is currently a research fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School, where she is investigating the legal challenges of “governance-by-design” in online distibuted architectures, such as Bitcoin, Ethereum etc. She is also a co-founder and Chief Alchemist at Backfeed, a... Read More →


Wednesday November 11, 2015 17:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room_10
 
Thursday, November 12
 

08:10

ICC BASIS Business Briefing
 *This meeting is open to Business attendees only

Thursday November 12, 2015 08:10 - 08:50
Workshop Room_10

09:00

WS 120 Launching UNESCO Internet Freedom Series Publications
The launch seeks to share UNESCO’s flagship series publications on fostering Internet freedom and present the key outcomes from these studies in a wide range of crucial issues ranging from online freedom of expression, privacy, digital safety to intermediaries liability and Internet governance declarations. UNESCO has started in 2009 to commission this series aiming to provide in-depth analysis and recommendations to its Member States and other stakeholders, with a total of five editions delivered and more new ones to come in the following year. All these studies have also contributed to UNESCO’s comprehensive study “Keystones to Foster Inclusive Knowledge Societies: Access to information and knowledge, Freedom of Expression, Privacy and Ethics on a Global Internet” as mandated by Resolution 37 of the UNESCO General Conference. 
The concrete titles include: 
1). Building digital safety for journalism: a survey of selected issues (English Version)
2). Fostering Freedom Online: The Role of Internet intermediaries (English Version)
3). Principles Governing Internet Governance (English Version)
4). Freedom of Connection Freedom of Expression: the Changing legal and regulatory ecology shaping the Internet (English and Spanish Version)
5). Global Survey on Internet privacy and Freedom of Expression (English and Spanish Version)

A short introduction to each study will be presented by the commissioned authors, and the discussion will focus on the joint follow up actions on the Series with partners. Limited number of hard copies of the publications will be distributed at the session.

Thursday November 12, 2015 09:00 - 09:30
Workshop Room 2

09:00

Dynamic Coalition on Gender and Internet Governance

Women, as one of the fundamental stakeholders in the information society, play a very crucial role. It is important for the IGF to fully integrate gender concerns in its work. The three sectors with the IGF's defining feature of mutistakeholderism are not monolithis, unitary and consistent actors. Greater efforts have to be to ensure that women's diverse perspectives are brought to the forefront in each stakeholder group. Ultimately, a rights based approach to Internet governance is the only safeguard for women to fully enjoy the benefits of the Internet.

Access to the Internet is extremely important for women to be able to gain information which may not be available to them otherwise. This will also facilitate them to achieve full realisation of their rights, especially in case of those from the marginalised communities. The Internet can also function as the harbinger of citizenship rights, bridging their right to be informed with the duty of the governance institutions to inform.


Thursday November 12, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 5

09:00

Dynamic Coalition on Internet Rights and Principles

The IRPC Charter of Human Rights and Principles for the Internet - Online Consultation

http://review.intgovforum.org/igf-2015/dynamic-coalitions/dynamic-coalition-on-internet-rights-principles-irpc/

This meeting marks six years since the IRPC Charter of Human Rights and Principles for the Internet begun as a collaborative, cross-sector project to develop a coherent and legally viable human rights framework that could be applied to Internet governance policy-making and processes. In that time it has moved from rough draft form to an authoritative working document that has framed and guided thinking across a number of sectors. In the last few years it has been implemented on the ground. For instance, it has informed intergovernmental analyses of existing human rights for the online environment (e.g. the Council of Europe Guide on Human Rights for Internet Users) and legal analyses (e.g. the Chilean Institute of Human Rights). The Charter and its “Ten Punchy Principles” have proven their relevance as working models for grassroots awareness-raising campaigns (e.g. the Hivos IG-MENA Click Rights campaign), and innovative legislative initiatives (e.g. the NZ Greens’ Internet Rights and Freedoms Bill). The Charter work has also benefitted and learnt from precursor and parallel initiatives through the contributions of individuals and organizations in the IRPC such as the APC Bill of Internet Rights and the Brazilian Marco Civil da Internet. The IRPC Charter, as a whole and the 10 IRP Principles in particular, are also part of university curricula around the world, from Latin America to the Philippines, to the UK and the USA.

The current version of the Charter has therefore achieved its goals and had a clear impact in human rights advocacy for the Internet. In addition it has been published in booklet form in English and nine other languages and so become accessible to new audiences online and in print form. Because it has been developed as a comprehensive framework anchored in international human rights law and norms, the Charter has also been a formative contributor to increasing official recognition that online rights and fundamental freedoms matter too, e.g. the UNHRC 2012 Resolution and the NETmundial Outcome Document last year. But these six years have also been marked by major technological developments, and revelations that have implications for how human rights can be protected and enjoyed online, and future roles and responsibilities for the Internet’s governance. Along with celebrating these achievements comes the opportunity to solicit suggestions from the broader IG community from all stakeholders, as part of the IGF’s Dynamic Coalition consultation. This meeting will provide an opportunity to review and summarize this feedback.

The first half of the meeting is in two parts:

(1) Roundtable

A) First, a roundtable discussion that assembles members of the IRPC and invited Human Rights experts attending IGF João Pessoa to first discuss recent implementations and adaptations of the IRPC Charter that have applied human rights frameworks in the technical sector (i.e, at the ICANN and IETF); recent consultations of the IRPC Charter; and recent developments in translation of the IRPC Charter (Launch of the Braizilian Portuguese translation).

B) Next, preparation for the Dynamic Coalition Main Sessions at which the IRPC will present the IRPC Output Document. Participants will discuss the results of the online consultation of the IRPC Charter requesting feedback from the audience on specific consultation points. At the end of this half of the session, inputs will be collected to provide support and content for a summary statement that will be drafted and presented to the Main Session on Dynamic Coalitions Day 4 and 5.

(2) Annual General Meeting: The second half of the session will be the coalition’s Annual General Meeting. The IRPC Charter is available online in Portuguese, Spanish, English, and several other languages at http://Internetrightsandprinciples.org/site/.

Background Note

The Internet Rights and Principles Dynamic Coalition is an open network of individuals and organisations based at the UN Internet Governance Forum (IGF) committed to making human rights and principles work for the online environment.

Since the 2009 IGF in Sharm El Sheikh we have been working to outline how human rights standards should be interpreted to apply to the Internet environment, and the internet policy principles which must be upheld in order to create an environment which supports human rights to the maximum extent possible.

The main work of the Internet Rights and Principles Coalition (IRP Coalition) has been to translate existing human rights to the internet environment to build awareness, understanding and a shared platform for mobilisation around rights and principles for the internet.

Our flagship document, the Charter of Human Rights and Principles for the Internet covers the whole gambit of human rights drawing on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other covenants that make up the International Bill of Human Rights at the United Nations (http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Pages/WhatareHumanRights. aspx). It is the outcome of work from many people and organizations over the years and is growing in stature as others start to apply its 23 clauses to specific situations. 

To get more directly involved you are welcome to join the IRP Mailing list:  
https://lists.internetrightsandprinciples.org/mailman/listinfo/irp 

Feel free to contact us at:  info[at]irpcharter.org

 

Session Organizers
avatar for Catherineeaston

Catherineeaston

Internet Rights and Principles Coalition
Internet governance, access to the Internet for disabled people
avatar for Marianne Franklin

Marianne Franklin

IRPC Steering Committee / Professor of Global Media & Poiitics (Goldsmiths, UK), Internet Rights & Principles Coalition / Goldsmiths (University of London, UK)
http://internetrightsandprinciples.org/site/ @netrights http://www.gold.ac.uk/media-communications/staff/franklin/ @GloComm


Thursday November 12, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 6

09:00

Dynamic Coalition on the Internet of Things

Since the 3rd Internet Governance Forum (IGF) meeting in Hydrabad (2008), IoT has been on the agenda for multi-stakeholder discussions of all IGFs, We came to understand that the way forward is to be found in taking ethical considerations into account from the outset, both in the development, deployment and use phases of the life cycle, thus to find a sustainable way ahead using IoT helping to create a free, secure and enabling rights based environment. This has resulted in a draft Statement that can be found at http://review.intgovforum.org/igf-2015/dynamic-coalitions/dynamic-coalition-on-the-internet-of-things-dc-iot-4/. This statement is on the table for this session. We want to further explore what “ethical” actually means in this global context, and how a commitment to such an ethical approach could look like. Earlier reports on the work can be found the DC IoT website at http://www.iot-dynamic-coalition.org/. The DC workshop will be oriented around 5 key ideas that are reflecting our current thinking working towards a common appreciation of IoT good practice in 2016.  These ideas are at the core of the draft declaration. Welcome to join!

Agenda, 12 November 2015, 09:00 – 10:30 AM local time

  1. Opening, introduction  draft declaration on IoT Best Practices by Maarten Botterman, Chairman DC IoT, Chairman Public Interest Registry
  2. Background to the draft declaration: history and thoughts on ways forward by Wolfgang Kleinwaechter, University of Arhus, ICANN Board 
  3. Panel, moderated by Avri Doria, with representatives from all sectors. Panel participants: 
    1. Megan Richards, European Commission
    2. Jari Arkko, IETF
    3. Carlos A. Afonso, CGI
    4. Max Senges, Google
    5. Joe Aldaheff, ORACLE, ICC
    6. Sergio Paulo Gallindo, BRASSCOM
    7. Olga Cavalli, ITU-T WS 20 on IoT
    8. Sebastian Bellagamba, ISOC
  4. Open discussion with all participants and panel), moderated by Avri Doria

Session Organizers
avatar for Maarten Botterman

Maarten Botterman

Director of the Board, ICANN
As an active participant of the global Internet community my main interests are in general governance issues, supporting the global NGO and cause driven community to get the best out of the Internet, and emerging issues such as the need to continuously improve the working and thus justified trust in the Internet, and the Internet of Things, big data, etc (both benefits/necessity and threats). Background in Information Society policy analysis... Read More →



Thursday November 12, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 3

09:00

WS 146 Connected vehicles: net governance and autonomous transport
The Internet of Things is bringing together a range of public policy, commercial and technological developments in respect to transport. Machine-to-machine communication, big data, cloud computing, sensors and actuators, are enabling an increased use for autonomous machines and intelligent systems. Whether it be self-driving automobiles or unmanned remote controlled drones, a growing range of autonomous devices are some of the possible end-points of that development. These vehicles pose several types of Internet governance questions and issues that include those of a technical, commercial and policy/regulatory nature, such as: 
  • Are the current and future (mobile) Internet capabilities ready for the needs of autonomous vehicles? 
  • Will autonomous vehicles require a higher availability and real-time quality of service for the Internet and is that possible with a best effort network?
  • Does the current governance of the Internet provide the right mechanisms to deliver on technical and commercial demands (e.g. security, interoperability, network identification)?
  • What role can standards and sharing good practices play? 
Other issues such as empowerment, privacy, data as a public good, public safety, competition and regulation will also be analysed. 

The workshop will be of an exploratory nature. It will deepen the discussion on the Internet of Things commenced at the IGF2014, by evaluating a particular segment instead of focusing on the full breadth of the subject. By combining the discussion over policies and practices around this technology with the technical governance of the Internet, the interplay between the two becomes more visible with workshop participants being able to interact.

Link of previous IGF workshop

http://www.intgovforum.org/cms/wks2014/index.php/proposal/view_public/61


Names of participants

  • Bill Woodcock, CEO of EcoTruc and Executive Director of Packet Clearing House
  • Helani Galpaya, Chief Executive Officer of LIRNEasia
  • Mr. Alexandre Liu, Strategic Director of BYD Energy, Brazil
  • Guilherme Correa, Infrastructure Analyst at Department of Science, Technology and Industry and Manager of the Centre of M2M/IoT Communications at the Brazilian Ministry of Communications

Name of in-person Moderator: Tracey Weisler (US Federal Communications Commission)

Name of Remote Moderator: Lorrayne Porciuncula (OECD)

Agenda

1. Opening remarks on issues surrounding the connected vehicles debate by the moderator of the workshop, Ms. Tracey Weisler (5 min.).

2. Interventions by (7-10 min. each):

3. Questions by the moderator to the panellists and interaction (30 min.)


Session Organizers
avatar for Lorrayne Porciuncula

Lorrayne Porciuncula

Internet Economist / Policy Analyst, OECD
Lorrayne Porciuncula is an Economist/ Policy Analyst at the Digital Economy and Policy Division (CDEP) of the Directorate Science, Technology and Innovation in the OECD. Lorrayne works on the OECD-IDB Broadband Policy Toolkit for Latin America and the Caribbean that aims to situate policy recommendations to the specific regional and local contexts. Previous to her current position, Lorrayne has worked as an economic analyst in the International... Read More →



Thursday November 12, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 9

09:00

WS 21 SIDS Roundtable: the "Free Internet" - Bane or Boon?
As an outcome of the Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States (SIDS Conference) held on 1-4 September 2014 in Samoa, the SIDS ACCELERATED MODALITIES OF ACTION [S.A.M.O.A.] Pathway (http://www.sids2014.org/samoapathway) has indicated:

- The ability of the small island developing States (SIDS) to sustain high levels of economic growth and job creation has been affected by the ongoing adverse impacts of the global economic crisis, declining foreign direct investment, trade imbalances, increased indebtedness, the lack of adequate transportation, energy and information and communications technology infrastructure networks, limited human and institutional capacity and the inability to integrate effectively into the global economy.

In recognition of this challenge, SIDS are, along with other underserved targets (such as Africa, for example), the object of several programmes by OECD-based private sector to bring Internet access at either free, or close to free rates. Many have welcomed this intervention, given the limited resources of the Government and the indigenous private sector operators.

Other observers have however argued that this "free" access to the Internet, is actually akin to "being locked up in a corporate digital prison" (Niels ten Oever, Article 19 via http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/03/24/us-africa-internet-idUSKBN0MK10F20150324)

As part of its ongoing Research & Action Agenda, the 2015 SIDS Roundtable seeks to elucidate all sides of the argument, searching for common ground and understanding, with a special emphasis on increasing the volume of seldom heard voices of the SIDS in Global Forums such as the IGF.

Discussants  include:

Mr. Carlton Samuels
Academic Community
Adjunct, Department of Library and Information Studies
Faculty of Humanities and Education
University of the West Indies (Mona)
Jamaica

Dr Ellen Strickland
Technical Community/Civil Society
Community Programme Director, InternetNZ & Vice Chair, Pacific Islands Chapter of Internet Society
New Zealand

Maureen Hilyard
Pacific Islands Chapter of the Internet Society
Cook Islands
(Remote Discussant)

Ms. Deirdre Williams
Civil Society
Co-Coordinator
Civil Society Internet Governance Caucus
St. Lucia

Professor Patrick Hosein
Academic/Technical Community
University of the West Indies (St. Augustine)
Trinidad & Tobago

Niels ten Oever
Civil Society
Head of Digital, ARTICLE 19
Netherlands

Dr. Vint Cerf
Chairman
American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN)
USA

Dr. Robert Pepper
Private Sector
Vice President, Global Technology Policy - Cisco
USA

Mr. Dhanaraj Thakur
Academic/Technical Community
Research Manager, Alliance for Affordable Internet
Jamaica

Rhea Yaw Ching
Private Sector
Covela.org
Trinidad & Tobago/USA

Session Organizers
avatar for Tracy Hackshaw

Tracy Hackshaw

Vice Chair, Internet Society Trinidad & Tobago Chapter
Connect with me on LinkedIn (www.tracyhackshaw.com)


Thursday November 12, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 4

09:00

WS 139 Enabling the Next Billion Users through Universal Acceptance
The support of internationalized domain names brings the Internet a huge step closer to fulfilling its promise of inclusiveness and diversity, facilitating the sharing of knowledge globally and promising connectivity to the next billion new Internet users. For those in under-served regions, such capabilities would remove yet another barrier in information access by enabling communication in native languages.

But that promise of inclusiveness and diversity is only partially fulfilled. Currently, treatment of internationalized domain names and email addresses is inconsistent across systems, including rejection. This is part of a class of issues commonly referred to as “Universal Acceptance.” 

This roundtable will bring attention to lack of Universal Acceptance, discuss necessary systemic changes, and facilitate stakeholder collaboration to develop meaningful solutions. 

Stakeholders with practical experience in Universal Acceptance from different parts of the world have accepted invitations to participate, including end users, systems administrators and developers, and organizations looking to expand their Internet reach globally. The IGF is an excellent place for this multi-stakeholder exchange to better understand the scope of the issues and more effective means for collaboration in developing solutions that work. 

Our Roundtable format is designed to engender attendee participation in person and online. Several speakers will participate online rather than in-person and the workshop moderator will encourage online participation prior to the meeting using social media. Topic leaders will: provide examples for attendees to type into their browsers, share solutions, and solicit audience discussion to form a communications plan. “Light bulbs will go on.”

Thursday November 12, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 7

09:00

WS 261 Big Data for Development: Privacy Risks and Opportunities?
In recent years, the potential of big data derived from the Internet and other digital devices to transform targeted advertising, recommender systems, location based services, logistics and other activities in the private sector has come to fruition. Increasingly, parallel applications in development work have emerged, proving the utility of big data for monitoring and measuring social phenomenon including disease outbreaks, food security, or migration. However, the opportunities presented by big data simultaneously raise serious concerns about privacy, especially when it comes to use of personal data. To realize the benefits of “Big Data for Development” it is important to find solutions for how to protect fundamental rights and values, including the right to privacy as recognized by the UDHR and ICCPR. The recent UN Resolutions and June 2013 report of the UN HCHR stressed the importance of considering the risks that uncontrolled use of personal information poses to human rights.

Therefore, this panel will engage multi-sector stakeholders in a dialogue on critical topics related to data protection and privacy to strengthen the overall understanding of how privacy protected analysis of big data along with the assessment of risks and benefits can contribute to sustainable development and humanitarian action. The panelists will offer strategies on how to reduce risks of Human Rights violations in the context of big data for development and also suggest solutions that can be implemented into existing risk mitigation frameworks. This panel will be highly interactive, encouraging active audience participation through preliminary and real-time Q&A sessions.

Thursday November 12, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 8

09:00

WS 98 Dangerous Speech Online: Identification and Strategies
Online hate speech is an ongoing and serious concern for Internet stakeholders. The complex tangle of issues include its implications for disempowered groups, Internet enabled anonymity, its cross-border nature and the effects of regulation on freedom of expression.

This roundtable will discuss comparative experiences with hate speech, especially online, from around the world with a focus on South Asia. It will use Susan Benesch’s Dangerous Speech framework to see if it is possible to separate offensive speech and hate speech from speech that is likely to result in violence. Using Susan’s context-driven understanding of dangerous speech, we will explore different strategies, especially non-legal ones, to deal with online hate speech.

We expect this session to help distinguish between different kinds of online speech like the Charlie Hebdo cartoons, and the targeting of Shias and Ahmadis online in Pakistan and the circulation of morphed images suggesting violence by muslims in India. Speech targeting women and sexual minorities will be a part of this conversation.

Government regulation of online hate speech often backfires because of the tension between any regulation of speech and freedom of expression. The UN Special Rapporteur Frank La Rue has recognized this tension and has advocated the limited use of legal measures along with non-legal measures to handle hate speech.

The IGF has discussed elements of online hate speech before but has never considered how to isolate and target dangerous speech (as opposed to hate speech). Contextualising this discussion in South Asia will make it particular rich and complex, and suited to very immediate concerns.

Thursday November 12, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room_10

09:00

WS 110 “Internet Plus” to Fuel Industry Evolution
Internet is a miraculous gene inheriting an evolutionary force, whichfirstly changes the way we think and liveand then propelsproductivityinnovation. With the Internet’s integration into various industries, we witness the birth of the concept “Internet Plus”: Internet Plus news agencies formulates web portals, Internet Plus banks generates online payment, Internet plus education produces e-learning, Internet plus medical treatment creates intelligent health care system etc…We can’t help but wondering what’s the next “Internet Plus Magic”?

In China’s annualgovernment work report this year, Premier Li Keqiang provided a full picture on the circumstances surrounding"Internet Plus". He pointed out,“Internet Plus”is“to tactically integrate mobile Internet, cloud computing, and the Internet of Things with modern manufacturing, to encourage the healthy development of e-commerce, industrial networks, and to help Internet companies increase their international presence”.Today, we have seen many examples of how extensively“Internet Plus”isused to contribute to the economic growth and human welfare by way of facilitatingindustry upgrading and economic restructuring. 

All this said strategic coordination and planningare pretty much essential in the whole story of “Internet Plus”, especially for developing countries in the sphere of new technology application, mobile Internet industry promotion, broadband connectiondevelopment, etc.

In consideration of above, this workshop will cover the following topics:
1. Successful experience and scientific methodology to share on “Internet Plus” mode?
2. Obstacles when the Internet integrates into traditional industry?
3. How to promote and optimizethe effectof “Internet Plus” via enhanced cooperation?
4 Potential risks posed by Internet Plus, e.g. widening digital divide,etc?

Thursday November 12, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 1

09:00

Enhancing Cybersecurity and Building Digital Trust
For the Internet to truly become an engine for growth an development a secure and enabling Cyberspace is an imperative. We need to:        boost global trust, promote international stability of the internet and enhance cooperation in global internet governance       develop safer ways to do business and transact online       protect people from threats to the exercise of their online freedoms      Identify, isolate and protect people from crime related activities       Augment and complement existing G2G multilateral, intergovernmental and multistakeholder initiatives to address global and national issues DIGITAL TRUST: With the Internet as the foundation of the global economy, cybersecurity is increasingly becoming a critical issue in Internet governance. If inadequately addressed, these challenges will lead to a lack of resilience, with adverse impact on trust in the global digital ecosystem and sustainable economic growth.  The current ecosystem has several challenges and dilemmas in the way we may attempt to secure these goals.  There are several orphan unresolved issues. This main session aims to bring stakeholders from various backgrounds together to discuss these challenges in an inclusive, transparent, bottom up and participatory manner.  The full potential of the internet can only be achieved by working together across nation states and stakeholder groups. Co-Facilitators: Dominique Lazanski (ICC Basis), Subi Chaturvedi and Segun Olugbile MAG Volunteer- Juan Gonzalez. MAG and Non MAG. The session will build upon existing global initiatives including GCSC2015 and others. Agenda : KEY THREADS and timings - This main session will explore the following:  Identify the issues: what are the critical challenges in establishing resiliency and trust from the different stakeholders’ perspectives? • 35 mins session answering the following question: o What are the key issues and challenges for a secure and sustainable free and open cyberspace and how can international cooperation be enhanced? • Engaging with diversity and regional/national/linguistic/forensic challenges – problem definition with a solutions approach/ case studies? o Assess the capacities: what capabilities are essential to addressing cybersecurity challenges and how can they be measured? • 35 minutes answering the following questions: o How do we strike the right balance between cybersecurity and human rights including free speech? o How can we create a secure cyberspace for netizens, small and large business, startups and governments without thwarting innovation?  o How do we engage diversity and regional/national/linguistic/forensic challenges? BRIEF BREAK Capacity building: what are the best practices in addressing today’s and tomorrow’s challenges? What platforms would facilitate and accelerate these efforts and how can they best achieve synergy in this field? • 35 mns answering the following questions: o How do we promote the use of internet for international peace and security? What recommendations are there for high level principals for cyber cooperation? o How do we discover new approaches for institutionalising and disseminating best practises for capacity building including: ♣ Rights, Recourse, Jurisdiction - Understanding risk behaviour, disruptive technologies initiating cyber hygiene, national digital literacy and broadband plan integration  Multistakeholder collaborations: what are examples of successful proactive and reactive collaborations to address cybersecurity challenges, either nationally, regionally, or globally; within a sector and across sectors? • 35 mns answering the following questions: o How can we amplify multistakeholder participation in promoting international stability of the internet and enhancing cooperation in global internet governance towards a secure cyberspace? o How do we enhance digital trust and protect privacy through bilateral and multistakeholder initiatives and collaborative spaces? o What case studies are available? Next steps: What practical and concrete steps can be taken or initiatives could be implemented? What other evidence-based research is needed? • 35 mns answering the following questions: o How can Cybersecurity be more open, accountable and transparent? o What are the next steps? And what processes can and should be part of the next steps? Chair: Paulo Sergio Carvalho Moderators: Wout de Natris – de Natris Consult Paul Blaker – Department of Culture, Media and Sport, UK Government Panelists: The session will strive for stakeholder, gender, regional and perspective diversity and balance with an equal emphasis on in room and online participation and interventions. PROPOSED SPEAKERS 1. David van Duren (d.p.c.t.van.duren@nctv.minvenj.nl) of the Global Forum on Cyber Expertise 2. Chris Painter Head of Cyber Issues (US State Department – Governments and c Compliance/Balance 3. Govt. of Netherlands (Dutch) – Recommendation from Arnold van Rinj 4. Bob Hindon – ISOC – Chairman of the board 5. Paulo Sergio Carvalho - Host Country chair 6. Rahul Gosain: From India we will have a speaker from either of the stakeholders due to the complexity of issues and nos. 7. Tomas Lamanauskas, Head, Corporate Strategy, ITU- Confirmed 8. Megan Richards – EU confirmed 9. Michael Kaiser – Stop. Think. Connect 10. Carolyn Nguyen - Microsoft 11. Audrey Plonk - Intel 12. Corrine Cath - Internet & Jurisdiction Project – recent Oxford University graduate (tentative) 13. Academia – ALX (University of Mexico) online intervention? 14. Marco Hogewonig – External Relations Officer – Technical Advisor RIPE NCC Remote moderator/Plan for online interaction: There will be two remote moderators. It is our intent to fully engage with the remote hubs as well as the online participants. Format:  The session will be conducted initially as a roundtable. To facilitate discussion amongst in-room/online participants and audience members, the moderator will lead the discussion through the topics above and encourage different perspectives to be shared. For in-room participants, the table will be set up as a U-shape to allow for easier interaction, with delegate participation encouraged at all times. Participants/ Interactivity: We would like to invite a diverse group of participants, both in-room and online, who can share existing research, best practices or specific challenges in multiple sectors and geographies. Stakeholders should be selected from individual users, small/medium enterprises, security technology firms, multinationals, government, intergovernmental organizations, civil society, and academics. Social Media/ Outreach • A twitter handle • With key hashtags (existing and new ) • A dedicate facebook page ‘Feeder’ workshops (if applicable) and/or connections with other sessions: Several workshops have been identified. Desired results/output: A read out at the end of the session encapsulating the substantive points by session rapporteurs followed by a written report for publication and feeding into the chair’s summary. Identification, sharing and exchange of common issues and solutions.

Thursday November 12, 2015 09:00 - 12:30
Main Meeting Hall

09:30

11:00

Open Forum - Commonwealth IGF

Open Forum: Commonwealth IGF

12 November 2015: 11.00 - 12.20

Room 9 

Organised by the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation

 

Draft Agenda

 

  • ICTs, Internet governance and Sustainable Development – Mr Shola Taylor, Secretary-General, Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation

 

  • IPv6 transition: Introduction and capacity building needs – TBC

 

  • Next billion access: How could the Commonwealth stakeholder community use the IGF10 policy options document – Mr Mark Carvell, Director, Global Internet Governance Policy, Department for Culture, Media and Sports, UK

 

  • Briefing on CTO initiatives – Mr Shola Taylor, Secretary-General, Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation

 

  • Briefing on Commonwealth Cybercrime Initiative – Mr Tracy Hackshaw, Deputy National Chief Information Officer, Republic of Trinidad and Tobago

 

  • Commonwealth IGF 2016 -  TBC

Thursday November 12, 2015 11:00 - 12:00
Workshop Room 2

11:00

WS 226 Internet governance and Open Government Data initiatives
The workshop will explore the relationship between access to the internet, and the development of web-based Open Government Data initiatives. As the number of OGD data initiatives increases worldwide, including in countries where open governance is not common, the internet governance issues surrounding such release of data have yet to be thoroughly investigated. The workshop will focus on some of the issues that have arisen with the advent of Open Data Initiative, particularly in the African Sub-region with Ghana as the use case. This will be done with a view to helping to bring focus to internet governance issues, such as access, the data divide and privacy. We will also examine the need for global ethical standards that can govern the responsible release and use of such data globally within an internet governance framework. In this present days, Open Government issues are been discussed outside internet governance domain. We will examine perspectives from multiple internet governance stakeholders about determination of what data is released and how it is used. This will be done to stimulate discussion about the issues by looking at the number of culturally influenced views on the issue of internet governance and open data initiatives.

Thursday November 12, 2015 11:00 - 12:00
Workshop Room 3

11:00

WS 65 The Benefits and Challenges of the “Free Flow” of Data
The Internet was designed so that global data flows would be dictated by efficiency, rather than centralized control or oversight. This engineering principle has provided businesses and consumers with access to the best available technology, information, and services, wherever those resources may be located around the world. It has benefitted virtually all industry sectors, from manufacturing to financial services, education, health care, and beyond. The “free flow” of data is what has allowed the Internet flourish into what it is today.

Yet governments, corporations, and non-state actors around the world are increasingly employing a variety of technical, legal, and administrative tools to restrict data flows, limiting routing and data storage to particular jurisdictions and restricting the kinds of content and data types that are permitted online. Some of these restrictions have been put in place for legitimate purposes, designed to further privacy protections, network security, and fair commerce, and have been justified within the bounds of international law and norms. Others, however, are less defensible, and are intended to unfairly support preferred commercial interests or to quell domestic political dissent. 

This panel will discuss the many benefits and challenges of the free flow of data. It will foster a discussion of the ways in which stakeholders can address the underlying reasons for data flow restrictions (such as the need for law enforcement access to data or the desire to nurture local ICT industry development, etc.) without subverting the Internet’s core potential for innovation, economic growth, and public welfare.

Thursday November 12, 2015 11:00 - 12:00
Workshop Room 5

11:00

Dynamic Coalition on Public Access in Libraries

Libraries Connect the Next Billion

How do we ensure that we connect the next billion, in absence of technology and connectivity that can reach every individual, globally? The Dynamic Coalition on Public Access in Libraries believes that this will only be possible when we recognize the value of the institutions that we already have in our communities for connecting people and information: 320,000 public libraries.

The Dynamic Coalition is presenting a statement of principles for feedback during the 2015 IGF main sessions that proposes the critical role of libraries for connecting communities and individuals. In preparation for taking action on these principles, panelists at the DC-PAL workshop will discuss how organizations are connecting communities, and provide examples of actions that each stakeholder group can take so that libraries can realize their potential to connect the next billion. 

Following this discussion, participants will participate in planning the work of the DC-PAL in 2016. The coordinators propose that the objective of 2016 will be to agree upon three concrete actions that members of each stakeholder group can take to further the principles of promoting connectivity, access and media and information literacy through libraries.

Speakers:

 

  • Manu K. Bhardwaj, U.S. Department of State – Global Connect Initiative
  • Stuart Hamilton, International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) – UN 2030 Development Agenda
  • Ramunė Petuchovaitė, Electronic Information for Libraries (EIFL) – Capacity building in Ghana, Kenya and Uganda.
  • Moderator: Christina de Castell, International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA)

 

Schedule:

 

  • 11:00-11:50 Discussion of existing initiatives that promote public access in libraries by participating stakeholder groups
  • 11:50-12:20 Proposal and discussion of recommended stakeholder actions to promote the DC-PAL principles as 2016 DC-PAL activity
  • 12:20-12:30 Conclusion and action plan

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Christina de Castell

Christina de Castell

Manager, Policy and Advocacy, IFLA - International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions


Thursday November 12, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 6

11:00

Death and the Internet - Managing Digital Legacies
Previously, our legacy was simple. With our belongings in the family home, complexity only arose when allocating very tangible assets fairly amongst our heirs. Now, with an increasingly digital life, the question is changing from who gets what, to where is what, as our heirs take on the complex task of unravelling our vast digital footprint. There are many fascinating and complex issues in planning our digital legacy, but a distinct lack of guidance available for our loved ones when the inevitable happens. Questions of privacy, access and inheritance are presently unresolved and societal attitudes unclear. The secrets once undiscovered until after finding Grandma’s stash of letters can now wind up spread across social media or exposed in public databases.

The issues the bereaved need to navigate are becoming ever more complex and urgent. They need to locate digital assets and records and navigate through complex contractual and technology challenges to resolve ownership issues and to produce meaningful and dignified records. These issues cross regional and national borders, where legislation varies considerably. To resolve the issues, at least one state of the USA has now enacted legislation and it is likely that other governments elsewhere will in the future. 

This workshop will expose the many legal and social questions around access to a person’s digital life after death: what rights should heirs have and what rights do they have? This forum will highlight the issues for legislators and consumers, and explore ways of assisting people in planning their digital legacy.

Thursday November 12, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 7

11:00

WS 150 IGF initiatives MasterChef
The purpose of the workshop is to analyze different "recipes" of national and regional IGF initiatives, to work-out some practical recommendations regarding minimal set-up of ingredients, process of cooking, spices and so on.

We expect to receive full spectrum of varieties of classical recipes and, indeed, to enrich the experience with different varieties of best-practice from different countries and regions.

Another objective of the workshop is to find the way for improving IGF process in a whole, to create stable and effective structure of vertical and horizontal hierarchy between IGFs of different levels, to enhance synergy and cooperation between them.

Session Organizers
avatar for Lianna Galstyan

Lianna Galstyan

PR Manager, ISOC Armenia



Thursday November 12, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 4

11:00

WS 163 Multi-stakeholder Internet Governance -IANA Stewardship
The transition of Stewardship of the IANA Contract from the US to the Global Internet Community is, arguably, this year's most significant event on the IG Agenda. 

This session (which will not focus on the substance of the debate of the transition proposal or of the associated Accountability measures) will provide behind the scene insights from participants in the IANA Stewardship Transition process; including:

- how the bottom-up multistakeholder model has been used to make tough
operational decisions that will affect the whole Internet
- how the model employed; with coordination by the IANA Coordination Group (ICG) worked
- the issues through working on Accountability measures in parallel to Transition proposal 
- how initial positions held were examined
- how these positions evolved in the course of discussions, both
on-line and in face to face meetings
- the lessons to be learnt for other IG issues

The session will include personal insights from community members who
started out with very diverse, conflicting views which reflected the
views of their Community, finally moving towards consensus on the best solution for the operational stability of the
Internet.

This session will demonstrate the maturity of the multistakeholder
model of governance; relevant - not least - in the UNGA discussion on the WSIS+10 Review. 

Participants (in a roundtable format) have been drawn from across the Community.  

The Cross Community Working Group on Internet Governance is a formal body within the ICANN Community Structure drawing membership from nearly all of the Constituency bodies.


Moderator: William Drake; International Fellow & Lecturer University of Zurich, Switzerland

Panelsits include:

Olivier Crepin-Leblond
Rafik Dammak
Lynn St. Amour
Lise Fuhr
Elise Lindeberg
Alan Greenberg
Jari Arkko
Arun Mohan Sukumar
Izumi Okutana
Dr Steve Crocker 

Session Organizers
NH

Nigel Hickson

VP; IGO Engagement, ICANN
ICANN or cricket


Thursday November 12, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room_10

11:00

WS 123 Indicators to promote evidence-based policymaking
Policymakers should rely on high-quality data to underpin evidence-based policy decisions. In this context, monitoring the development of information societies to promote evidence-based policymaking requires the development of internationally agreed ICT indicators. Thus, measurement can be considered a critical activity, not only for generating relevant information for ICT policies (before and after the policy was taken), but also for designing effective Internet Governance strategies.

Despite the growing debate on measurement of Internet access and use – in part as an outcome of initiatives such as the Partnership on Measuring ICT for Development, there is a lack of systematic and reliable ICT statistics, expressed, for instance, by the lack, in several nations, of data that can be used to measure the development of information societies across the globe. 

At the same time, it is important to continuously revise existing indicators. The Internet is a fast moving subject. It is thus increasingly important that indicators reflect its dynamics and provide more in-depth analysis, focusing in understanding barriers for not using the Internet and the digital inequalities among people who are already online. Similarly, research agenda must also address diversity issues, such as socioeconomic status, age, level of education, gender and accessibility. 

The objective of this panel is to discuss the production and use of internationally comparable ICT-statistics from a multi-stakeholder perspective, focusing on the contribution of different data producers and users in measuring the socioeconomic implications of ICTs. Panelists are expected to identify best practices in data production and in bridging the gap between availability of statistics and evidence-based policymaking. 

Thursday November 12, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 8

11:00

WS 47 How Can Internet Policy-Making Support LGBT Rights?
The internet is a crucial tool and significant space for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) movements across the world to connect, mobilize, and advocate for social justice. Yet, LGBT activists face a number of challenges when working online:

- Censorship of LGBT content and tagging it as "harmful"
- Targeted online violence and threats against LGBT activists on social media
- Violation of the right to privacy around sexual orientation
- Threats to the right to anonymity and the particular significance of anonymity for LGBT youth 
- Violation of transgender persons' rights to choose and use different names and identities online
- Exclusion of LGBT activists from internet governance debates (regionally and internationally)

Therefore, this workshop brings together diverse stakeholders invested in LGBT equality to discuss the impact of internet policy-making on sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) rights. The break-out groups will discuss in-depth policies and practices that ensure LGBT rights at multiple levels of internet governance including:

- Understanding particularities of SOGI when it comes to privacy and digital security
- Designing technology that challenges gender binaries and heteronormativity
- Best platform policies on hate speech based on sexuality
- Unpacking "harmful" sexual content and addressing technical and political censorship of LGBT content in search engines, blogs, and websites
- Enacting policies for inclusion of LGBT voices within internet governance processes (national and international)

Based on discussions, the workshop will make specific recommendations for supporting LGBT rights at government, technical, corporate, and civil society levels.

Thursday November 12, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 9

11:00

WS 155 Encryption and Anonymity: Rights and Risks
Encryption and anonymity are two key aspects of the right to privacy and free expression online. From real-name registration in Iran to the UK Prime Minister's calls for Internet backdoors to encrypted communications, however, the protection of encrypted and anonymous speech is increasingly under threat. Recognising these challenges, the UN Special Rapporteur on freedom of expression, David Kaye, presented a report to the Human Rights Council in June 2015 which highlighted the need for greater protection of encryption and anonymity.

Five months on from the Special Rapporteur’s report, the participants in this roundtable will discuss his recommendations and the latest challenges to the protection of anonymity and encryption. For example, how can law enforcement demands be met while ensuring that individuals still enjoy strong encryption and unfettered access to anonymity tools? What steps should governments, civil society, individuals and the private sector take to avoid the legal and technological fragmentation of a tool now vital to expression and communication? How can individuals protect themselves from mass surveillance in the digital age?

At the end of the session, the participants should have identified areas for future advocacy both at the international and domestic levels as well as areas for further research for the protection of anonymity and encryption on the Internet.

In-person moderator: Gabrielle Guillemin, ARTICLE 19
Name of Remote Moderator: Ana Melissa Zarraga, ARTICLE 19
Name of Rapporteur: Niels ten Oever, ARTICLE 19

Speakers:
David Kaye, intergovernmental organisation, UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression - confirmed 
Juan Diego Castañeda, civil society, Fundación Karisma, Colombia - confirmed 
Edison Lanza, intergovernmental organisation, Organisation of American States Special Rapporteur - confirmed 
Pranesh Prakash, civil society, CIS India - confirmed 
Ted Hardie, private sector, Google - confirmed
Elvana Thaci, intergovernmental organisation, Council of Europe - confirmed 
Professor Chris Marsden, Academic/technical community, Oxford Internet Institute - confirmed 
Alexandrine Pirlot de Corbion, civil society, Privacy International - confirmed 

Session Organizers
avatar for Alexandrine Pirlot de Corbion

Alexandrine Pirlot de Corbion

Privacy International
Alexandrine is an Advocacy Officer at Privacy International working across the organisation and the PI network on privacy related issues with a particular focus on communications surveillance with the aim of engaging in advocacy activities at the national, region and international level and carrying out related thematic research. Additionally, she coordinates PI’s network of 29 organisations and experts in 20 countries across Africa, Asia... Read More →
GG

Gabrielle Guillemin

Senior Legal Officer, ARTICLE 19
Gabrielle is Senior Legal Officer at ARTICLE 19, an international free speech organisation based in London. She has been leading the organisation's work on internet policy issues since 2011. She is a member of the UK Multistakeholder Advisory Group on Internet Governance (MAGIG) and an independent expert attached to the Council of Europe committee on Cross-border flow of Internet traffic and Internet Freedoms. Prior to ARTICLE 19, Gabrielle... Read More →


Thursday November 12, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 1

12:00

WS 214 Internet interconnection under regulatory pressure
Peering coordinators and network engineers often describe internet interconnection as largely unregulated. And indeed, there is no central feature of the internet that has been subject to as little formal regulation as the making of connectivity. However, we can observe that local regulation is starting to emerge in the field. There is transparency regulation – for instance, in France networks have to report to the regulator upon request about their peering relationships. In the USA, the FCC just recently declared itself to be in charge of dispute resolution in interconnection conflicts. And then there is more general regulation, such as licensing rules that set a threshold for organisations to participate in internet interconnection at all (e.g. India) or, trade embargoes, which limit companies of a certain origin in operating in a specific country (like the USA in Iran). It is time to take account of this development and begin a debate about such governance initiatives in light of what we actually know about how connectivity is being established, maintained and discontinued.
The proposed workshop will serve to a) create an overview of emerging modes of regulation that affect internet interconnection in the different regions of the world, b) systematise the means, resources and motivations that regulators mobilise in these settings and, c) discuss experiences with and implications of the possible trend towards formal regulation of internet interconnection. The following experts will be on the panel: Mohamed El Bashir (Qatar Communications Regulatory Authority ), Prof. Laura DeNardis (American University, remotely), Mike Jensen ("IXP Toolkit"; APC/ISOC), Manoj Kumar Misra (Association of Competitive Telecom Operators/Vodafone), Martin Levy (Cloudflare) and Bill Woodcock (Packet Clearing House). Remote participation is encouraged. To get access, please register at https://intgovforum.webex.com/intgovforum/j.php?RGID=r97ca5605a0243cfb04345dae848ebe9e // The survey that is referred to in the introduction can be found online at http://limesurvey.hiig.de/index.php/675663?lang=en

Session Organizers
avatar for Uta Meier-Hahn

Uta Meier-Hahn

Doctoral Researcher, Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society
Doctoral Candidate at Freie Universität Berlin. Interested in internet interconnection and informal regulation of internet infrastructure. | Formerly Academic Editor at the Internet Policy Review - http://policyreview.info. Likes to travel light. #infrastructure #interconnection #economicsociology



Thursday November 12, 2015 12:00 - 13:00
Workshop Room 5

12:00

Open Forum - Council of Europe
Session Organizers
ET

Elvana Thaçi

Administrator, Council of Europe
Elvana Thaçi works as and administrator for the Information Society Division, in the General Directorate of Human Rights and Rule of Law of the Council of Europe. She has participated in the elaboration of a number of Council of Europe policy documents on the protection of rights and freedoms on the Internet, in particular freedom of expression and freedom of association. Also, she has been actively involved in Internet governance dialogues at... Read More →


Thursday November 12, 2015 12:00 - 13:00
Workshop Room 2

12:00

Open Forum - Freedom Online Coalition

The Freedom Online Coalition (FOC) is a partnership of governments who abide by the principle that “human rights apply online as they do offline”, and are committed to working together to support and protect Internet freedoms worldwide. The FOC was established at the inaugural Freedom Online Conference in The Hague in 2011. Today, the Coalition has 28 members, spanning from Africa to Asia, Europe, the Americas, and the Middle East.

By joining the Coalition, its members commit to upholding and advancing the Coalition’s shared goals and values, as stated in the FOC Founding Declaration (Freedom Online: Joint Action for Free Expression on the Internet), the Nairobi Terms of Reference, and the Tallinn Agenda.

Coalition members will give updates on the work of the Coalition since IGF Istanbul and the activities of the three working groups (WG 1 – An Internet Free and Secure; WG 2 - Digital Development and Openness and WG 3 – Privacy and Transparency Online)  on key issues of concern to Internet freedom.

At this IGF Open Forum, we invite the IGF community to engage in a Q&A with FOC member states, the FOC Secretariat and the co-chairs of the Working Groups on Coalition activities.


Session Organizers

Thursday November 12, 2015 12:00 - 13:00
Workshop Room 3

12:30

14:00

WS 245 Mexico: The National Digital Strategy and the MSH model
During this workshop, participants will have a broad understanding on the policies the Mexican Government is implementing in order to guarantee an effective Internet ecosystem in which access is granted to all its citizens as part of the development agenda. Also, the mexican government role in the Internet ecosystem, through multistakeholder mechanisms. Such efforts, which will be explained through a brief presentation, are envisage through two approaches:
a) The National Digital Strategy (NDS). From the Mexican perspective, the NDS is the key to democratizing access to tools such as the Internet and broadband, and making the most of the endless possibilities they offer. Its objectives are Government transformation, Digital economy, Quality education, Effective universal health and Public Safety; its enablers are Connectivity, Digital Skills Inclusion, Interoperability, Legal Framework and Open Data.
b) Participation in the Group on Internet Governance Initiative. The Legal Framework enabler of the National Digital Strategy includes an initiative on Internet Governance which recognizes the importance of multistakeholder discussions on this topic. As a governmental mechanism, the National Digital Strategy Coordination has joined the Mexican Group on Internet Governance Initiative since its establishment, in 2013. The Group is mainly responsible for carrying out the Dialogues on Internet Governance (http://www.gobernanzadeinternet.mx). This local effort has been inspired by the IGF and the multistakeholder model, in order to tackle the Internet governance issues in a multistakeholder approach. The Group has also served as an effective platform to exchange ideas and views among representatives from all the stakeholders in Mexico.

Thursday November 12, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Workshop Room 3

14:00

Dynamic Coalition on Accountability of Internet Governance Venues
Many of the Internet governance venues that deal with critical policy making issues on Internet governance should be subjected to a set of concrete criteria to be accountable to the broader Internet governance community. Not only should the private corporations that deal with Internet governance policy development be accountable, international organizations that also claim to have a non-binding and neutral process should uphold certain values and accountability standards.

With increased visibility and international focus on Internet Governance these discussions are taking place in an increasingly diverse selection of venues. We believe that the discussion on the accountability of these venues is a critical one and that the time is right for a forum to be established to bring together the stakeholders involved.

agenda
1. Setting the agenda for DC and th
e focus  (Robin Gross, Robin will talk briefly about the objectives of accountability dynamic coalition and abit of background, 4 minutes)
2. Importance of accountability in IG venues (Jeanette Hofmann, 2 minutes)
3. The criteria that should be implemented for accountability (here Jan will discuss the normative criteria of accountability  and other matters  , 4 minutes )

4. Different accountability mechanisms existing in IG organizations ( Farzaneh Badiei, Farzaneh will talk about general mechanisms ( what general what are the mechanisms , access to court, arbitration, internal dispute resolution and conflict resolution processes) 1 minute
6.  ICANN and its accountability mechanisms (Erika Mann, Erika will talk about ICANN's current accountability mechanisms, to whom they are accountable, 6 minutes )
7. Numbers (APNIC, Paul Wilson, Paul will talk about APNIC accountability mechanisms and their relation to ICANN, 6 minutes) 
8. National NIR, Izumi Okutani: Raising a community issue Language difficulties and accountability, 6 minutes 
9.  Different stakeholder groups viewpoints (based on personal views and their experience in their stakeholdergroups)
Business, Keith Drazek , Verisign, why accountability is important from the viewpoint of business (5 minutes) 
Civil Society , Jyoti, CIS, Why civil society cares about accountability (5 minutes)
Government (Jorge), Why governments require accountability from IG venues.(5 minutes)
10. The future of the dynamic coalition: Participants discussion, what should be added and what should be the focus, 45 minutes)

Session Organizers
avatar for Farzaneh Badiei

Farzaneh Badiei

Associate Researcher, Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society
Farzaneh Badiei is an associate researcher at Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society. She is finalizing her PhD at the Institute of Law and Economics, Hamburg University, Germany. Farzaneh’s research focuses on the institutional design of online private justice systems in commercial contexts. She is also interested in studying online intermediaries such as social networks and payment intermediaries and their justice systems, using a... Read More →


Thursday November 12, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 2

14:00

Youth Coalition on Internet Governance
The Youth Coalition on Internet Governance is an open group of organizations and individuals representing all stakeholders that work together for a better youth participation and involvement on Internet Governance discussions and debates. 

Thursday November 12, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 5

14:00

WS 169 Building Internet Observatories: approaches and challenges
The practice of setting up Internet observatories has gained a lot of grounds in recent years. Observatories range in scope and focus: some of them deal with specific issue-areas of the Internet governance overarching agenda (e.g.: the Internet and Jurisdiction Project and the Brazilian “Marco Civil” Observatory); others are broader in scope, dealing with the complex mosaic of Internet issues – from critical Internet resources to Internet-related public policies in general (e.g.: the Geneva Internet Platform, the Internet Policy Observatory, and the Brazilian Internet Observatory hosted by CGI.br). Observatories can be hosted by individuals, academic and technical organizations, as well as by governments and private companies. Their activities range from collecting and collating relevant content on online platforms to organizing events. Some of them even engage policy-dialogue as proper stakeholders for Internet governance. This roundtable aims at bringing together people involved with the Internet observatories from different parts of the World to reflect upon the following fundamental question: how can different projects create synergies, avoid duplication of efforts in their activities and foster cooperation among different projects to leverage capacity-building and education as well as policy-making vis-a-vis Internet governance?

Participants of the Roundtable
* Diego R. Canabarro / Carlos Affonso de Souza - Brazilian Internet Observatory, Multistakeholder Initiative
* Paul Fehlinger - Internet & Jurisdiction Project, Multistakeholder Initiative
* Tereza Horejsova - Geneva Internet Platform, Civil Society
* Kasia Jakimowicz - Global Internet Policy Observatory, Government
* Susan Chalmers - Friends of the IGF, Multistakeholder Initiative
* Omar Kaminski - Brazilian Marco Civil Observatory, Multistakeholder Initiative
* Stefaan Verhulst - The GovLab, Academia & Technical Community
* Arne Hintz - Mapping Global Media Policy, Academia & Technical Community
* Giancarlo Frosio - World Intermediary Liability Map, Academia & Technical Community
* Valentina Pavel - Mapping Policy Observatory, Civil Society
* Kelli Kim -  Open Net Korea, Civil Society
* Rob Faris - The Internet Monitor, Academia & Technical Community
* Adela Goberna - Yough@IGF Observatory, Multistakeholder Initiative
* Carolin Weisser - The Global Cyber Security Capacity Center, Academia

AGENDA

1) Outline of WS 169 [5 minutes, Diego]

2) Introduction [10 minutes]
  • Observatories and maps as source of info for IG stakeholders [5 minutes, Tereza/Paul]
  • An overview of the current landscape [5 minutes, Kasia]
3) Community dialogue [70 minutes]
  • Some info about the projects involved [20 minutes]
  • Users input: purposes, needs, and ways of engagement [50 minutes]
4) Conclusion & next steps [~5 minutes]

Session Organizers
avatar for Diego Rafael Canabarro

Diego Rafael Canabarro

Expert Advisor, CGI.br
Rapaz latino-americano s/ $ no bolso. BraSil. #netgov, int. politics , etc. CGI.br Advisory Team. PGP Key ID: 007A14F5



Thursday November 12, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 4

14:00

WS 50 WGIG +10
In December 2015, the UN GA will mark the WSIS+10 anniversary with a high-level intergovernmental meeting. 2015 is also the tenth anniversary of a multistakeholder experiment that helped bring the WSIS to a successful conclusion---the Working Group on Internet Governance (WGIG). Convened by the UN SG in 2004, the WGIG assembled forty representatives of governments and stakeholders who engaged in months of intensive peer-level dialogue and collective analysis. In June 2005 it released a consensus report that advanced a ”broad definition” of Internet governance; holistically addressed a range of policy issues; offered four competing models for the ”oversight” of critical Internet resources; and proposed the establishment of the IGF. The WGIG also generated an informal background paper, and a multi-authored book that was released at the Tunis Summit.

This Roundtable reassembles WGIG members who are still active in the field to take stock of progress on the WGIG+10 anniversary. Moderated by the Executive Coordinator of the WGIG secretariat and later of the IGF secretariat, the session will consider:

• The WGIG’s procedural contributions, e.g. to multistakeholder cooperation.
• The WGIG’s substantive contributions, e.g which elements of its analysis and recommendations remain valid, and which still merit further attention.
• The WGIG’s proposed mandate for the IGF as it has been implemented. 
• Whether the WGIG could serve as a model for the resolution of other pressing issues. 

The session will be based in part of an edited book to be released 1 December by the APC entitled, The Working Group on Internet Governance: 10th Anniversary Reflections.

Moderator:

Markus Kummer, ICANN Board of Directors, Switzerland

Participants:

Carlos Afonso, Instituto NUPEF, Brazil

Peng Hwa Ang, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

William Drake, University of Zurich / Noncommercial Users Constituency in ICANN, Switzerland

Raúl Echeberria, Internet Society, Uruguay

Baher Esmat, ICANN, Egypt

Juan Fernandez, Ministry of Informatics and Communications, Republic of Cuba

Ayesha Hassan, Internet Society, France

Wolfgang Kleinwächter, European Summer School on Internet Governance, Germany

Jovan Kurbalija, Diplo Foundation, Switzerland

Olivier Nana Nzépa, Anais-AC / University of Yaoundé II, Cameroon

Alejandro Pisanty, National University, Mexico

Masaaki Sakamaki, DOCOMO CS, Inc., Japan

Charles Shaban, Abu-Ghazaleh Intellectual Property, Jordan

Remote Moderator:

Grace Githaiga, Kenya ICT Action Network (KICTANet)

Rapporteur:

Stefania Milan, Tilburg University, the Netherlands





Session Organizers
avatar for William Drake

William Drake

International Fellow & Lecturer, University of Zurich
International Fellow and Lecturer, Institute of Mass Communication and Media Research, University of Zurich; Chair, NonCommercial Users Constituency, and member of the Nominating Committee, in ICANN; member, Coordination Committee of NETmundial Initiative; core faculty member, European and South schools on Internet governance; advisor to the World Economic Forum’s Future of the Internet Initiative; member of the Advisory Group of the Global... Read More →



Thursday November 12, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 8

14:00

WS 78 Equity and the developing world in internet governance
Internet governance (IG) refers to a set of institutions, principles and processes – global, regional and local – designed to address the oversight and management of key internet infrastructure: the Domain Name System, Internet Protocol (IP) addresses, and other web-based protocols. While the IANA transition process has triggered a lively debate on the contours of the “multistakeholder model”, a discussion on “equity” is yet to be had. Equity, in the context of global internet governance, could refer to two concerns: first, the equitable representation of voices and perspectives from developing countries and emerging economies, especially civil society, in IG policy debates. Who are the communities at the margins from the developing world, and how are they represented currently? Second, and equally critical, is the notion of inter-generational equity. The internet community of today is constantly evolving, bringing in new actors, constituencies and interests. Are internet governance structures well placed to absorb and accommodate new entrants who do not speak the epistemic language of domain names and protocols? If not, what are the institutional barriers preventing such adaptability? The roundtable discussion coordinated by the Centre for Communication Governance at the National Law University, Delhi is a step towards articulating equity principles, with specific reference to three existing IG structures: ICANN, the WSIS process, and the International Telecommunications Union. Discussants are expected to flag the democratic and deliberative deficit in each of these processes, offering their recommendations how to address them.

Thursday November 12, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room_10

14:00

WS 241 Revenue Streams that Grow & Sustain Internet Economies

IGF
2015 WORKSHOP #241

Revenue
Streams That Grow And Sustain Internet Economies

Conference
Day 3, November 12th 14:00-15:30

Hosts:

Technology Education Institute, Washington, D.C.

EveryLayer, San Francisco, California

Welcoming Remarks:  Moderator - Ambassador David A. Gross, Wiley
Rein, LLP (3 minutes) (confirmed)

Format:  Each panelist has five minutes for remarks
with remaining time for audience participation.  At the end of each panel and following the
important audience participation, Ambassador Gross will sum up key points.

Setting The Stage: Manu
Bhardwaj, Government, Senior Advisor on Technology and Internet Policy to the
Under Secretary of State, US Department of State (7 minutes) (confirmed)

Theme Questions:

What impact do higher/lower taxes, tariffs, licenses and permit fees have on the
expansion, adoption and integration of Internet enabled goods and services of a
country?

When considering how best to invest the tax/fee revenues from a country’s Internet
economy is it preferable to dedicate asset flows to the country’s Universal
Service Fund (USF) to be reinvested?  Or
can you get the same levels of return if the revenue goes in as general funds.

What tax and investment regimes should a country consider for their maturing
Internet economy if they want to ensure robust growth, adoption and
integration? In designing a national broadband plan for a country should
consideration be given to establishing a USF? When considering the challenges
of sustainable economic development should a county look to invest in Internet
capacity building, e-health, e-education and e-libraries? Will these areas and
others in the Internet ecosystem give the country the greatest return on their
investment?

First Panel:

Discussing Revenue Generation And Distribution As A Necessary Collective Action

(25 minutes)


  • Jorge G. Infante, Civil Society, OECD (confirmed)

  • Matthew Perault, Corporate, Head of Global Policy Development, Facebook (confirmed)

  • Audience participation

Second Panel:

Examples Of Revenue Regimes ( “The Good, The Bad And The Ugly!”) (30 minutes)


  • Alejandro Delgado Moreno, Government, Head Of The International Office Of The ICT
    Ministry, Colombia (confirmed)

  • Natasha Jackson, Private Sector, Head of Consumer Affairs, GSMA (confirmed)

  • Ellen Blackler, Corporate, VP Global Public Policy, The Walt Disney Company (confirmed)

  • Audience participation

Third Panel:

Revenue Investment Options And Their Impact (25 minutes)


  • Clovis Baptista, Private Sector, former Executive Secretary of the Inter American
    Telecommunication Commission-CITEL (confirmed)

  • Michael Kende, NGO, Chief Economist, ISOC (confirmed)                                   

  • Audience participation

Remote Moderator:  Vlada Radunovic, DiploFoundation



 


Session Organizers
avatar for Garland McCoy

Garland McCoy

President, Technology Education Institute
Committed to Connecting the Next Billion.


Thursday November 12, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 9

14:00

WS 56 Mobile Payment Boosts Internet Economy and Challenges
With the popularization of smart device and emerging of mobile Internet, mobile payment has become an important way of payment. And various industries met great innovation opportunities based on mobile payment. 

However, some issues emerge accompanying with the industry’s development process. Security and technical standard are the two main issues to be tackled. According to research and survey, the security of mobile payment is one of the main concerns for user. So many of them refused to bind their bank account with the mobile payment application. As to the banks, they also expressed their concerns over malicious attack to the banking system. There is no worldwide mobile payment standard yet that it is not easy to conduct worldwide promotion. For the governments, mobile payment brought new challenges to their regulatory capability, because mobile payment involved several different domains, including banking, telecommunications, payment system etc. 

The panel will invite multi-stakeholder representatives to discuss the following points and provide policy advice: 

a.How could mobile payment further promote Internet economy development? And how to define the future development direction of mobile payment? 

b.How to strengthen the construction of mobile payment security and how to give proper education to the users?

c.What are the feasible policies that the government can make to both promote mobile payment development and keep its vitality? 

d.How to get over the difficulties in establishing worldwide technical standard on mobile payment, realize cross-border payment and to protect user’s information?

Thursday November 12, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 6

14:00

WS 190 Evolving Cyber Assurance across Societies & Supply Chains
The Internet continues to evolve, driven by markets and technologies. National digital economies and digital societies depend on this evolution. Money is increasingly being made, but also stolen. Societies are increasingly vulnerable. The lack of accountability and trust on the Internet has be to addressed. Internet governance must evolve to enable new policies, procedures and mechanisms to meet emerging cybersecurity, counter-fraud and trust requirements of citizens, communities, supply chains and governments. Our economic and global future depend on this.

Building on EU MAPPING's progress and its international community, this senior expert panel will outline the latest situation and describe how collaborative risk management, cyber controls frameworks and federated identity management are combining to support cyber assurance. The panel will look at major drivers, relevant international standards and requirements for better cyber assurance, including key functions for new Internet Governance. 

It will highlight noteworthy developments in major industry sectors and topics such as trusted cloud, crypto-currencies, age verification, and reducing the risk of malware enabled and counterfeit products that run or are connected to the Internet. The panel will identify existing standards to address some of these areas, including The Open Group’s Open Trusted Technology Provider™ Standard (O-TTPS), which focuses on product integrity and supply chain security and has been submitted as a PAS for ISO approval. 

The Q and A and interactive discussion with attendees will link these topics to required developments in Internet Governance and to the need for guidance in these areas for developing nations and small businesses.

Thursday November 12, 2015 14:00 - 16:00
Workshop Room 1

14:00

A Dialogue on “Zero Rating” and Network Neutrality

IGF Day 3 - 12 November 2015 - 2:00-4:00pm


Overview:

The objective of this session is to provide the global Internet community, and policymakers in particular, with an informed and balanced dialogue on the complex Internet policy issue of “zero-rating.”


The purpose of the session is to help others, in their respective countries and locales, in their own analyses of Zero-Rating (ZR). The session will promote access to expert insight and multistakeholder community discussion. We encourage remote and in-person participation and aim for complete diversity across stakeholder groups and perspectives. As a main session, translation will be available in the official UN languages.


There are many different viewpoints on ZR, with some stakeholders being completely against the practice to others being fully supportive. In the open discussion leading up to this session, it has become apparent that some stakeholder approaches to ZR are more nuanced and varied than “for or against.” The session will consider the full spectrum of views.


In the case where ZR is advanced as a means to drive Internet access and narrow the digital divide, this session will also explore alternative approaches, such as the use of community networks.


Agenda:


The agenda is currently being developed between organizers and moderators. Based upon list discussion to date, the session will involve the following elements:


  • Introduction and Opening - After a brief introduction by the session organizers, the lead moderator will ask expert speakers to provide a brief description of how they view ZR.


  • Multistakeholder, expert dialogue - A moderated discussion on zero-rating amongst experts holding different positions and perspectives. The discussion will be based upon policy questions contributed from the community.


  • Community questions and discussion - Remote and in-person participants will be invited to pose questions to the experts, as well as to engage in guided discussion on topics raised.


  • Alternatives - Alternatives to zero-rating as a means to advance access, such as community networks, will be explained and illustrated.


  • Contributions from relevant IGF workshops - A handful of workshops at this year’s IGF will consider zero-rating. Organisers or participants from these workshops will be invited to contribute a readout to the session.



Policy Questions:


Based upon submissions from the community, below are examples of the policy questions that will be addressed during the session:

  1. Please describe ZR as you see it in 90 seconds.

  2. Under what circumstances are there benefits of ZR? What are the benefits? Under what circumstances are there detriments from ZR? What are the detriments?

  3. Is all zero-rating bad? Or are there business models of ZR that are good? Should the bad models be regulated? should the good models be regulated? How?

  4. Is ZR an anti-competitive business practice, or does ZR enhance competition?

  5. Does a focus on Zero-Rated Internet access in developing countries divert government attention and investment away from other efforts to enhance access?

  6. In those countries which have banned zero rating, what has been the impact?

  7. Does ZR limit or skew end-user behavior? If so, how? Is this effect different from that of other free offerings over the Internet?

    1. What are your thoughts,, for example, the following hypothetical: Imagine that Developer says to Consumer, "Send me your Internet bill at the end of the month. If you are being charged $Y/MB, and you consume Z MB of our service, we will send you a check for $Y*Z or simply reduce your bill with us by that amount.

  8. How should regulators / governments address the potential tension between expanding Internet connectivity and the desire for “pure net neutrality?”


Host Country Chair: Mr. Nivaldo Cleto, Owner at Classico Consultoria, Advisor to the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee of Brazil (CGI.br) and Board member of the Board of Trade of Sao Paulo (JUCESP), as a Representative of the Union.


Moderators:


The role of the moderators is to keep the discussion focused, self-referencing, fluid, friendly, and on time.


  1. Lead/expert moderator: Robert Pepper, VP, Global Technology Policy, Cisco

  2. Remote moderator: Ginger Paque, Director, Internet Governance Programmes, Diplo

  3. Floor and Readout moderator: Carolina Rossini, VP, International Policy, Public Knowledge

  4. Floor and Readout moderator: Vladimir Radunovic, Director, E-diplomacy and Cybersecurity Programmes, Diplo


Expert speakers: (confirmed as of 29 October 2015)


  1. Jochai Ben-Avie, Senior Global Policy Manager, Mozilla, USA

  2. Eduardo Bertoni, Professor, Universidad de Palermo, Argentina
  3. Igor Vilas Boas de Freitas, Commissioner, ANATEL, Brazil

  4. Dušan Caf, Chairman, Electronic Communications Council, Republic of Slovenia

  5. Silvia Elaluf-Calderwood, Research Fellow, London School of Economics, UK/Peru

  6. Belinda Exelby, Director, Institutional Relations, GSMA, UK

  7. Bob Frankston, Computer Scientist, USA
  8. Helani Galpaya, CEO, LIRNEasia, Sri Lanka

  9. Anka Kovacs, Director, Internet Democracy Project, India

  10. Kevin Martin, VP, Mobile and Global Access Policy, Facebook, USA

  11. Pranesh Prakash, Policy Director, Center for Internet and Society, India

  12. Steve Song, Founder, Village Telco, South Africa/Canada

  13. Dhanaraj Thakur, Research Manager, Alliance for Affordable Internet, USA/West Indies

  14. Christopher Yoo, Professor of Law, Communication, and Computer & Information Science, University of Pennsylvania, USA



Plan for online interaction:


This session will include a remote panelist who will be prepared to speak from a remote hub.


Both in situ and remote interventions are being carefully coordinated to maximise a diversity of views in the available time.


This session will treat online participants on equal footing with in situ attendees, and will monitor remote attendees specifically to ensure that their requests to ask questions will be noted. Participant interventions in the session will consist of questions, at two structured points in the session. Floor moderators will collect the questions, and will consult with the panel remote moderator to ensure that remote questions are considered, as the moderators select for stakeholder balance and remote representation. Remote participant questions will be read into the session in English or Spanish by the remote moderator, to avoid 'transaction cost' (time and possible connection difficulties).


‘Feeder’ workshops and/or connections with other sessions:


We have identified the following workshops and other sessions as relevant. Each shall provide a 1-2 minute readout or preview from their session.


  1. Workshop No. 156: Zero-rating and neutrality policies in developing countries

  2. Workshop No. 79: Zero-rating, Open Internet, and Freedom of Expression

  3. Workshop No. 21: SIDS Roundtable: “Free Internet” - Bane or Boon?

  4. Dynamic Coalition Session: Dynamic Coalition on Net Neutrality

  5. Access/PROTESTE event on Zero-Rating


Desired results/output:


As explained above, our desired result is to provide the global Internet community with a well-rounded and insightful dialogue on the Internet policy issue of zero-rating. The discussion is an output in and of itself, from which policymakers around the world should benefit. In accordance with the IGF reporting requirement, a rapporteur shall produce a neutral report of the session, which will not draw conclusions on the topic, but rather will summarise the main points discussed.



Session Organizers
avatar for Susan Chalmers

Susan Chalmers

Principal Consultant, Chalmers & Associates
Open Internet advocate, MAG member.


Thursday November 12, 2015 14:00 - 16:00
Main Meeting Hall

16:00

16:00

WS 128 Mitigate Online Hate Speech and Youth Radicalisation
From socializing and entertainment to homework, the Internet is an essential part of life for young people today, opening vast new opportunities for connecting and learning. At the same time, the Internet provides violent extremists with powerful tools to propagate hatred and violence and to identify and groom potential recruits, creating global online communities that promote radicalization.
The emergence and diffusion of hate speech online is a new and fast evolving phenomenon and collective efforts are needed to understand its significance and consequences, as well as to develop effective responses. 
UNESCO takes this session to share the initial outcome from its commissioned research on online hate speech including practical recommendations on combating against online hate speech through understanding the challenges, mobilizing civil society, lobbying private sectors and intermediaries and educating individuals with Media and Information Literacy. In related to this, the workshop would also discuss how to help empower youth to address online radicalization and extremism, and realize their aspirations to contribute to a more peaceful and sustainable world. 

Thursday November 12, 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room 9

16:00

WS 158 Blasphemy policies: Consequences for digital world
The extension of Blasphemy Laws that criminalize expression deemed blasphemous or defamatory of religion has become an increasingly important concern.

In Asia, particularly, the issue of "blasphemy" in online spaces has taken a dangerous turn. 
The Blasphemy Law in Pakistan carries a death sentence. To date, no one has been hanged for conducting blasphemy, yet many have been killed by angry mobs and vigilantes with complete impunity. The internet has brought new dimensions to the debate. In Pakistan, a professor was charged for an allegedly blasphemous Facebook status, and his lawyer was also killed.

Similarly, in Bangladesh, bloggers have been killed on blasphemy charges by mobs, and In Malaysia, ‘insulting Islam’ has been used to carry out crackdowns against criticism of state institutions that manage religious affairs.

The Rabat Action Plan (2013) calls for the repeal of blasphemy laws due to their stifling impact on freedom of expression, encouraging positive policy measures, including those for political leaders and media, to promote pluralism for countering intolerance. Not only the Rabat Plan gone unimplemented, we are also witnessing an escalation in crackdown on expression on the basis of blasphemy.

This workshop seeks to build on the Asia Regional Conference on Freedom of Expression, Opinion and Religious Freedoms (June 2015) to generate discussion on the impact of blasphemy laws on the governance and practice of freedom of expression online. The workshop will bring together experts from around the world to see how this issue manifests in different regions and what Internet Governance frameworks can be employed to tackle the issue.

Thursday November 12, 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room 1

16:00

WS 7 How Trade Agreements Shape the Future of Internet Governance
Without the attention of most stakeholders – even those deeply immersed in multistakeholder discussions on the future of internet governance –bilateral and multilateral trade negotiations are increasingly becoming the vehicles for norm setting on internet policy issues – from intellectual property to e-commerce, domain names on the Internet, to cybersecurity and national security exemptions to free flow of information and investor-state dispute settlement mechanisms. The norm, in these multilateral forums, is secrecy. In general just governments and a few private sector lobbies have access and can provide informed input to so-called policies of the 21st century . But not just multistakeholderism is affected by the way Trade Agreements’ negotiations are conducted, basic principles of democracy are at stake. This debate/roundtable/workshop will assess how the inclusion of these internet policy issues in closed door, state-to-state agreements impact the future of multi-stakeholder internet governance and what are the digital rights at stake. Workshop participants will receive an update on the state of negotiations of the core trade agreements, and will then discuss how these secret negotiations impact on their rights, business, or expectations regarding the open internet. Additionally, participants will be shown a map of the qualitative and quantitative increase on internet related rules in trade agreements, covering the trade agreements negotiated primarily by the US over the past 12 years.

Agenda

The moderator will give the overview of digital trade in TISA, TPP and TTIP and introduce the speakers. 

Then each speaker has 5 to 7 minutes to make their case. The moderator can ask questions to the speakers before she opens the floor to questions. 

At the end of the discussion, the moderator may ask the participants to summarize what they have said, adding any comments they want to include.

Moderator: Carolina Rossini

Speakers

Julia Reda, Member of the European Parliament

Burcu Kilic, Public Citizen

Claudio Ruiz, Derechos Digitales

Marcel Leonardi, Google

Usman Ahmed, PayPal

Laura DeNardis, American University

Manu Bhardwaj, U.S. Department of State


Session Organizers
avatar for Burcu Kilic

Burcu Kilic

Legal and Policy Director, Public Citizen
avatar for Carolina Rossini

Carolina Rossini

VP of International Policy, Public Knowledge
2016 World Economic Forum Young Global Leader


Thursday November 12, 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room 5

16:00

WS 228 Enhancing Gender Participation within IGFs
The session will begin with a discussion on the past role of women in Internet governance over the years. Next, the discussion will shift to the current status of women in Internet governance and future opportunities to enhance gender participation within IGFs.

Multistakeholder engagement in the National and Regional IGF has many dimensions: it involves ensuring participation and representation of various stakeholders (NGOs, public and private sectors, the technical community, academics, etc), as well as geographically diverse representation, and gender-balanced participation. Yet, often it is this last category that remains an unmet goal. Gender equality and women’s empowerment is recognized as one of the post-2015 sustainable development goals; a clear recognition that gender can no longer be a forgotten component of multistakeholderism.

Focusing women's participation on the IGF, data of the gender report card of 2013 show that there was only one session with no men in the group of panelists. In the same time, there were 24 sessions with no women being panelists. In the total amount, there were 104 women panelists against 146 men, that means, almost three men panelists for every two women panelists. Yet, in the total number of sessions in 2013, only 6% had gender as the main theme.

This roundtable will be focused on the one hand, global IGFs, and on the other hand, national/regional IGFs regarding the participation of women in all aspects of the IGF and N/R Initiatives, such as planning, organizing, facilitating, delivering and decision-making.

Thursday November 12, 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room 2

16:00

WS 27 Viable application & debate: online participation principles
The importance of inclusion for participation in IG processes cannot be overstated. The first principle of the Statement of Principles Submitted to NETmundial by the Internet Governance Caucus reiterates this ubiquitous significance: 1- Internet governance institutions and processes should be open and inclusive. They should be bottom-up and consensus-based in their approach to policy development. Internet governance institutions and processes should be transparent, accountable, and enable the meaningful participation of all stakeholders.

This workshop builds up on the previous IGF workshops on e-participation principles in 2011, 2012, 2013. In spite of continuous and fruitful discussions in the previous years, online participation is still not understood and implemented as a substantial part of the IGF but rather seen as a mere service and implemented with very few resources and without a grand plan. This shows the need to continue the efforts. Moreover, this invites for formally finalising and outlining the principles for online participation and presenting at the IGF, in order to bring proper attention to online participation.

The workshop will present the principles, which should serve as a formal and tangible output of the IGF2015. It will then bring an Oxford-style debate addressing an underlying question whether online participants should have equal footing with in situ participants in open conferences and meetings. The workshop will then offer attendees a chance to air the best and worst practices seen in online participation, in an effort to discuss the way to actually implement the principles, and identify the obstacles in this. 

Thursday November 12, 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room 8

16:00

WS 200 DoubleIrish,DutchSandwich,aCaipirinha:InternetTaxationTale
The interest of governments in understanding and taxing Internet services is escalating. Whereas some countries are interested in fighting international tax-avoidance strategies of multinational companies, others tackle the issue of taxing specific Internet services within their territory.

Due to the novelty of the topic at this venue, the organizers expect to (i) collect the views of different stakeholders, (ii) highlight some of the most important issues pertaining to Internet taxation, (iii) identify proper venues where this matter (iii.a) is being and (iii.b) should be addressed, (iv) brainstorm ways forward (e.g., best practices, formal legal compromises, multilateral and multistakeholder approaches), (v) establish a coalition of stakeholders interested in further research and development on this matter.

Expected taxation topics: Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS), OTTs and telecom services, bitcoin, cloud, data centers, e-commerce, internacional corporate strategies, jurisdiction, taxing/detaxing

1. Balázs Gulyás, Civil society, Hungary
2. Igor Vilas Boas de Freitas, Comissioner, Anatel (National Telecommunication Agency), Brazil
3. Primavera di Philippi, Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University, USA/France
4. Carlos J. Perez Chow, Creel Abogados, Mexico
5. Usman Ahmed, Georgetown University Law Center, United States
6. Renata Emery, Partner of Xavier, Duque Estrada, Emery, Denardi Advogados, Brazil
7. Parminder Jeet Singh, IT for Change, India
8. Fitahiana Zoniaina Rakotomalala, Civil Society, Madagascar
9. Carlos Raúl Gutierrez, GNSO Council at ICANN, Costa Rica

Session Organizers
avatar for Sergio Alves Jr.

Sergio Alves Jr.

Coordinator, CEDIS/IDP - Instituto Brasiliense de Direito Público (Center for Internet, Law & Society)
Brazilian, telecom & Internet policy, government, academia (Brasilia Institute of Public Law / IDP). | | Session #200 organizer: "A Double Irish, a Dutch Sandwich and a Caipirinha, por favor: a tale of Internet taxation"; Nov. 12, 4PM.


Thursday November 12, 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room 6

16:00

WS 34 Internet Governance 2015: Promoting Trade, Inclusion & Trust
Every day we witness how the Internet is enabling economic opportunity, innovation, exchange of knowledge, and economic and societal inclusion. The evolution of the Internet has facilitated development of a “digital ecosystem,” enabling the creation of a new, jobs-creating products and services as well as opportunities for innovation that have improved the quality of life in countless global communities. 

Access to technology and Internet-enabled innovation depends on stakeholder opportunities to invest and compete, sufficient infrastructure, and cross-border flows of data and information. These essential elements have been challenged of late by some government measures that aim to promote domestic industry and innovation, but effectively limit the globalized nature of the digital ecosystem. A key question with respect to Internet governance, therefore, is the need to identify policies and practices that either open opportunities for economic and social development for all through trade or act as barriers to their fruition. Building user trust in technology also is essential, requiring improved procedures aimed at optimizing the benefits of data flows and security/privacy concerns.

This Roundtable workshop will call upon speakers to examine these opportunities and challenges. They will draw on case studies and important work by the OECD on data driven innovation and the Internet Policy Principles. The goal will be to develop a core set of best practices in Internet governance to enable all participants to tap the potential of the digital ecosystem to realize sustainable development.

Thursday November 12, 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room_10

16:00

WS 35 Across The Globe: Local Infrastructure is Local Development
Internet infrastructure is critical for economic development. A robust Internet infrastructure facilitates new business and encourages local content. We propose a workshop devoted to understanding how Internet infrastructure can be quickly, easily and effectively deployed in areas where it is not robust. Conversation among the discussants and members of the audience will be facilitated by thoughtful, prepared questions by the discussants, active audience centered activity by the moderator, and use of Twitter and remote tools by those unable to attend in person. 


The workshop will strive to provide thoughtful analysis of how we can best encourage the growth of data centers and other Internet infrastructure providers in places where it is not robust. How can we make local hosting a viable option amidst other global options? How can we best help promote the usage and development of the local Internet ecosystem more broadly?

Although efforts have been made to increase locally produced content, it has proved far more difficult to have the delivery networks where the content is hosted, built and physically supported in developing countries. We aim to bring together experts from countries that have worked diligently to facilitate infrastructure development in order to discuss how we can best grow the Internet Infrastructure and ecosystem worldwide. The goal is to help propose goals and best practices for the growth of the global Internet ecosystem. 

Thursday November 12, 2015 16:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room 7

16:30

WS 17 Cybersecurity Awareness though Multistakeholder outreach
The 2014 IGF hosted a workshop that featured a high level discussion about the pros, cons and challenges facing multistakeholder approaches to addressing cybersecurity issues. They explored key questions such as “Why should a multistakeholder approach be used and what are the elements of a successful public private governance model?” and “Can multistakeholder efforts succeed in an era where the trust between governments and other parts of the community is eroding?”

The session clearly struck a nerve as 30+ workshop participants were asked to leave the room and take their networking and idea exchange to another room to make way for the next session.
We wish to continue this discussion but add a more hands on practical component to it. After briefly reviewing the success people had in taking what they learned and implementing it in their countries, we will work toward charting a course where others can take these successful implementation experiences and use them in their country. 

Sharing best practices and developing a track record people can call on in the future is the goal of this session.

A rough agenda would be:
1) Two 7.5 minute introductions and overviews from co-moderators
2) 35 minutes of free-flowing discussion 
3) 10 minutes of summary and next steps

We anticipate a lively discussion that engages the experience of audience members and educates those who are not as familiar with these efforts.

We will deliver an outcome document that includes key recommendations for implementing public private partnerships in addressing cybersecurity awareness.

Thursday November 12, 2015 16:30 - 17:30
Workshop Room 4

16:30

Main Session on Dynamic Coalitions

Dynamic Coalitions Main Session

 
Length

3 Hours, split into two 90-minute sessions:

-   90 minutes on Day 3 afternoon

-   90 minutes on Day 4 morning


Brief Description/Objective

After 9 years of letting Dynamic Coalitions evolve in the margins of the IGF, the MAG agreed to bring their work into the mainstream and let them present their findings with a view to producing IGF outputs.

This is in line with the recommendations of the CSTD Working Group on IGF improvements which called for more tangible IGF output. The primary objective of this Main Session is to give an opportunity for the DCs to present and showcase their work to the broader community in a formal manner, during a main session at the IGF annual meeting. Many of the DC’s have undertaken and achieved significant work in their respective fields and allowing them to present working outputs for broad community feedback at the IGF will help increase and strengthen IGF outputs for use of other relevant IG fora and bodies. This session will also be a good chance to highlight the work of the DCs in general and hopes to encourage increased participation in the DCs by those attending the IGF in Brazil in person and following remotely.

The structure of the Main Session, split into two days, will reflect the progress of respective DCs’ working outputs, as determined and declared by those same DC’s. The first part of the session on Day 3 will devote speaking slots to those DCs with final, complete outputs, who are actively seeking feedback from the community. Participants will be encouraged to complete rating sheets on the output documents, which will be broken down into the main issues under discussion.

The second part of the Main Session on the morning of Day 4, will give additional DCs who wish to do so the opportunity to introduce themselves, discuss their work, and encourage participation in their group. The rest of the second day will be devoted to discussion and debate on the outputs presented on the first day. The feedback received via rating sheets will provide guidance for the future work of the DCs.

The following DCs will present their work and receive feedback on both days of the Main Session:

- Dynamic Coalition on Accessibility and Disability (DCAD)

- Dynamic Coalition on Core Internet Values (DCCIV)

- Dynamic Coalition on Gender and Internet Governance (DCGIG)

- Dynamic Coalition on Internet Rights & Principles (IRPC)

- Dynamic Coalition on Network Neutrality (DCNN)

- Dynamic Coalition on Platform Responsibility (DCPR)

- Dynamic Coalition on Public Access in Libraries (DCPAL)

- Dynamic Coalition on the Internet of Things (DCIoT) 


The following DCs will introduce their work on the second day of the Main Session:

- Dynamic Coalition on Blockchain Technologies (DCBT)

- Dynamic Coalition on Child Online Safety (DCCOS)

 

Agenda and Format

The session is divided into two broad parts, in order to: 

a) allow the Dynamic Coalitions to present their work, in the first part.

b) allow for discussions and debate, in the second part.


Policy questions

The various DCs have been invited to formulate policy questions.

Among others, the following policy questions have been proposed for consideration:

-   The Internet of Things (IoT) is in early stages, and in many ways new possibilities are developed and discovered beyond our imagination, and we welcome it for its potential to help alleviate specific societal challenges where it can. To foster both innovation and user trust in the Internet of Things, like the Internet, a careful balance should be struck between regulation and innovation. What principles should we embrace to ensure that <1> innovation and beneficial application of IoT can foster and <2> society is comfortable with the way these products and services are set up?

-  Good Practice aims at developing IoT products, ecosystems and services taking ethical considerations into account from the outset, both in the development, deployment and use phases of the life cycle, thus to find a sustainable way ahead using IoT helping to create a free, secure and enabling rights based environment. In what ways can (and should?) we empower the users with regards to the use of data reporting on actions relating to their specific behavior as observed in an IoT enabled environment?

-  How can policy makers, libraries and businesses work together to prioritize providing Internet access through public libraries from an infrastructure standpoint?

-  What actions can IGF participants take to promote the role of libraries in creating informed and engaged populations who can effectively use the internet to access information, obtain government services and participate in social and economic activities?

-  How can we ensure that gender is a cross-cutting theme, not an island or silo, that contributes to strengthening internet governance?

-  How can we strengthen gender diversity - men, women, trans voices -  at all levels of internet governance (participants, moderators and panelists)?

· Chair:

[To be provided by the Host Country]

· Co-Moderators:

Jeanette Hoffman, Rachel Pollack 


Representatives from the DC’s will be presenting the work of their respective groups. Speakers are as follows:

- Dynamic Coalition on Accessibility and Disability (DCAD) : Francesca Cesa Bianchi, Andrea Saks

- Dynamic Coalition on Core Internet Values (DCCIV) : Olivier Crepin-Leblond

- Dynamic Coalition on Gender and Internet Governance (DCGIG) : Bishakha Datta

- Dynamic Coalition on Internet Rights & Principles (IRPC) : Hanane Boujemi, Marianne Franklin

- Dynamic Coalition on Network Neutrality (DCNN) : Luca Belli

- Dynamic Coalition on Platform Responsibility (DCPR) : Nicolo Zingales

- Dynamic Coalition on Public Access in Libraries (DCPAL) : Christina de Castell

- Dynamic Coalition on the Internet of Things (DCIoT) : Maarten Botterman

- Dynamic Coalition on Blockchain Technologies (DCBT) : Primavera De Filippi

- Dynamic Coalition on Child Online Safety (DCCOS) : Marie-Laure Lemineur

 

Remote moderator/Plan for online interaction

The two parts will be linked by feed-back that participants will be invited to give with idea rating sheets. This will allow the DCs to use the feed-back as an introduction to the second part of the session.

More about this rating sheet methodology is available on this website: http://www.idearatingsheets.org/

Moderator: Jeremy Malcolm

 

‘Feeder’ Workshops and/or Connections with Other Sessions

The annual DC meetings will take place ahead of the DC Main Session and are designed to provide input into the DC the main session.

Desired Results:

The outcome of the sessions will determine the level of support the various DCs enjoy from the broader IGF community. One of the session’s objectives is to determine whether there is acceptance on moving towards an IGF output.


Thursday November 12, 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Main Meeting Hall

17:00

WS 108 Documentary heritage in the digital age
The objective of the workshop is to inform about the importance of safeguarding the recorded knowledge, ensure the preservation and universal accessibility of the world’s documentary heritage. In particular, in the current context where resources of information and creative expression are increasingly produced, distributed, accessed and maintained in digital form, creating a new legacy:
the digital heritage.

The access to this relatively new form of documentary heritage will offer broadened opportunities for creation, communication and sharing of knowledge among all peoples. Internet offers unprecedented opportunities for citizens to access - in digitized form- the cultural heritage that serves as an important source of knowledge and cultural expression; even though the high cost and complexity of physical access to Information and communications technology (ICT) impedes Internet services, and access to certain groups, particularly developing countries.

Another objective of the workshop is to address the possibilities offered by digitization to improve access to information and knowledge. However, for developing countries there is an economic constraint to the high costs involved in the process of digitization and subsequent preservation of digital information.

In this regard, another workshop objective is sharing experiences and best practices on the implementation of national projects – supported by financial contributions from UNESCO through its Participation Programmes (PP) – in order to digitize the Cuban documentary heritage.

Wherefore the workshop searches to present the experiences on the implementation of PP "Scanning documents about slavery in Cuba" awarded to the National Archive of Cuba.

Thursday November 12, 2015 17:00 - 17:30
Workshop Room 3
 
Friday, November 13
 

08:10

ICC BASIS Business Briefing
*This meeting is open to Business attendees only

Friday November 13, 2015 08:10 - 08:50
Workshop Room_10

09:00

WS 147 A network of virtual working spaces for Internet Governance?
Internet Governance policy solutions cannot be developed merely through physical meetings. Bringing global actors together involves very high costs and however useful it might be, the proliferation of conferences places a heavy burden on everybody’s agenda. This situation threatens the inclusiveness of multi-stakeholder processes and delays the production of concrete outcomes. 

The solution is of course ongoing working groups operating through online tools. Mailing lists however have strong limitations and although a flurry of applications (such as Skype, Adobe connect, Google hangouts and many other) have drastically reduced the cost of casual teleconferencing, serious work in small groups for several hours in a row requires more reliable and performing virtual spaces. 

This short Birds of a Feather session is intended to gather interested actors to explore the feasibility of building a network of high-performance connected virtual meeting spaces for Internet Governance working groups, taking advantage of the dramatic lowering in costs of bandwidth, flat panel displays and image compression. 

A joint effort of technology providers, organizations (including IGOs), civil society networks and Internet services could help build a series of connected local hubs providing high capacity teleconferencing that could be used by multi-stakeholder initiatives, as well as to facilitate remote participation in numerous meetings, including the network of IGFs. 

Friday November 13, 2015 09:00 - 09:30
Workshop Room 2

09:00

WS 72 IANA functions transition:A New Era in Internet Governance?
IANA functions transition has been the focus of the past year’s Internet governance discussions. The three operational communities who rely on the IANA functions (names, numbers and protocols) were asked to draft proposals on how the transition should take place. By the time the IGF will be held, the final proposal will probably have been submitted by the ICG to the U.S. Commerce Department NTIA, and it will be a suitable period to analyze the proposal’s level of public support, strengths, weaknesses and features in a multi-stakeholder manner at a non-ICANN venue. 

The IANA functions transition has been organized within the ICANN community. IGF is an appropriate venue to engage a broader range of stakeholder groups and understand their perspective. 

This workshop considers the commonalities and differences in the proposals from Names, Protocols and Numbers communities. It evaluates the transition process and discusses how different constituencies have handled the way ICANN combines policy making for Names and the operation of the IANA functions. 

The workshop also discusses the way the proposal will be received by stakeholder groups not normally part of the ICANN process, such as the US Congress, other governments and other stakeholder groups. How are they reacting to the final IANA functions transition proposal, what are their concerns, is there any interference with the transition? The workshop’s contribution will be to broaden consensus on IANA transition requirements.

Panellists and Agenda 

Opening (5 minutes)The moderator (MM) will begin with a brief overview of the IANA transition, and the ICG (combined) proposal
Introductions (10 minutes)Each panelist is introduced and briefly (1-2 minutes) explains how their stakeholder group relates to the IANA functions operator and what they see as the benefits or problems of the transition.
Jari Arkko, Ericsson Research, IETF Chair, ICG member
Brenden Kuerbis, Postdoctoral researcher, Georgia Institute of Technology
Izumi Okutani, Policy Liaison, JPNIC and CRISP team memberNarelle Clark, Deputy CEO, Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN) and ICG member
Gangesh Varma, Centre for Communication Governance, National Law University, DelhiMary Uduma, Nigerian Communications Commission and ICG member
Keith Drazek, Verisign, Inc. and ICG member
Jandyr Ferreira dos Santos Junior, Government of Brazil, GAC representative



Session Organizers
avatar for Farzaneh Badiei

Farzaneh Badiei

Associate Researcher, Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society
Farzaneh Badiei is an associate researcher at Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society. She is finalizing her PhD at the Institute of Law and Economics, Hamburg University, Germany. Farzaneh’s research focuses on the institutional design of online private justice systems in commercial contexts. She is also interested in studying online intermediaries such as social networks and payment intermediaries and their justice systems, using a... Read More →
avatar for Milton Mueller

Milton Mueller

Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology
(TBC) Milton Mueller is Professor at the School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA. Mueller received the Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School in 1989. His research focuses on rights, institutions and global governance in communication and information industries. He is the author of two seminal books on Internet governance, Ruling the Root and Networks and States. Mueller was one of the founders of... Read More →


Friday November 13, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 5

09:00

WS 201 Ensuring sustainability for IXPs in the developing world
Bandwidth management has been for sometime an evolving concern for the Internet community around the globe. The rapid introduction of new Internet applications and services as well as the rapid growth of Internet-connected devices has created new challenges for the rational management of the network. Internet Exchange Points - IXPs are a vital strategy for enhancing the quality of Internet operation. One of the main advantages of an IXP is the rationalization of costs, since traffic balances are solved locally and directly between the participants not involving third-party networks often physically distant. Another important advantage is better traffic delivery management because data flows remain as closer as possible to their destination, resulting in better performance and quality to end users. Research carried out by CETIC.br has shown that the Brazilian IXP initiative (PTTMetro) yields up to 30% of savings in transit purchases by ISPs in the country. Despite the solid evidence and the well known benefits of IXP projects, the challenge of efectively involving the Autonomous Systems comunity, endangers the sustainability of the initiatives. The workshop puts together organizations in charge of IXPs and Autonomous Systems from all over the World to foster discussion on the challenges to create sustainable Internet Exchange Point projects in developing nations.

Friday November 13, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 7

09:00

WS 48 Internet of Things. Ethical Considerations for the Digital Age
Networked technology is spreading rapidly from traditional devices to everyday items, and even to the spaces in which we live. Before long, online functionality will be ubiquitous in the most commonplace objects, allowing them to identify, communicate and cooperate with one another.

Internet of Things puts fundamental ethical choices to the world. It comes with innovation, ease, but also questions and potential threats to livelihoods, security, internet governance and privacy. So, whether in employability, education, algorithms and human-“thing” interaction, societies face developments that have an enormous impact in fundamental ways. Ethical discussions have started but need direction and focus. This workshop connects different stakeholders who will discuss the opportunities and threats alike and aims to establish whether there is a need for a new set of norms, values and standards for the digital age. After an introduction, a round table debate will take place between the invited panellist, remote panellist and participants. The debate focuses on:

1. Employability and education in the future;
2. The question of who regulates profiling algorithms?;
3. Permissionless innovation;
4. Political leadership; innovation and ethics.

The report of the workshop provides recommendations on potential ways forward. For this NLIGF runs its own program together with ECP, Platform for the Information Society, in the Netherlands in 2015 and 2016 under the name “Human & Ethics” and closely works together with UNESCO, the Global Forum for Cyber Expertise, the DC IoT and the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs to translate the recommendations into tangible outcomes.

Session Organizers
avatar for Wout de Natris

Wout de Natris

Consultant/owner, De Natris Consult
Apart from organising Workshop #153 'Let's break down silos in cyber security and cyber crime' on behalf of SIDN and NLIGF, you can talk to me about cyber security and SMEs, national and international cooperation and opportunities to build bridges between different silos. I'm interested to hear your views and/or discuss how I can aid you in achieving your goals in establishing cyber security and better prevent cyber crime.



Friday November 13, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 1

09:00

WS 135 National and Transnational Internet Governance: Jurisdiction
Despite its appealing ubiquity, the Internet remains in many aspects a centralized resource. Data traffic is excessively concentrated in developed countries and a majority of Internet technology firms are originally from such countries.

Continuing efforts from all Internet Governance’s stakeholders to bring knowledge and capacity building worldwide is an ongoing process. But at the same time that different institutions that are responsible for the management and operation of Internet critical resources move towards a truly global multitstakeholder framework, the single fact that their operations are submitted to national jurisdictions might trigger a number of dilemas.

One pressing example of such situation is the little attention internationalization has received in the current review process of ICANN’s accountability and the transition of the IANA functions. Article 8th of the Affirmation of Commitments states that ICANN´s legal presence must remain in the United States. What are the impacts of such provision moving forward with the transition of the IANA functions and the implementation of a new accountability model? 

Can an organization such as ICANN serve the global public interest in being subject to the legislation of the state of California? Or is the specific legal presence of such an institution irrelevant as long as it remains under a predictable and stable regime? Is it possible to confer these Internet corporations an "international status"? Are there any existing international governance models that could be taken into account in the IG domain? What are the limits and possibilities that exist in contemporary International Law?

Friday November 13, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 9

09:00

WS 82 IGF beyond 2015: Extend mandate, strengthen institution
This roundtable will provide a more fulsome debate and discussion about:
a) why it is important to extend the IGF mandate beyond five years, 
b) how the IGF has served to strengthen the multistakeholder model of Internet governance, 
c) identify critical needs that can further strengthen and stabilise the IGF in its mission, 
d) how all stakeholders can collaborate to address these needs, 
e) identify potential actions for all stakeholders to engage with their national governments and missions to extend the IGF mandate and strengthen its model, and
f) develop common messages about the IGF and the need for its renewal that can be leveraged by all stakeholders in support of the WSIS review.

Friday November 13, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room_10

09:00

WS 253 Empowering the next billion by improving accessibility
While considerable attention is given to the availability of the communication infrastructure to expand usage of the Internet, little attention has been given to the accessibility barriers which prevent over one billion potential users to benefit from the Internet, including for essential services. Those barriers affect persons living with a variety of sensorial or physical disabilities as well as illiterate individuals who may benefit from the same solutions designed for persons with disabilities. 

This session will examine the technological and programmatic solutions available today for an effective removal of such barriers, potentially bringing a considerable number of new users to the Internet. Examples in Education, Emergency services, Assistive Technologies for work and independent living in a variety of economic and geographic environments will be covered. The session will also provide a detailed benchmark and statistical overview of the progress made by countries around the world in implementing those solutions. A general discussion with government, industry and persons with disabilities representatives will ensue.

Friday November 13, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 6

09:00

WS 224 Information Controls in the Global South
This workshop will explore efforts by civil society organizations in the global South, with a particular focus on Latin America, in challenging information controls and making meaningful impact on freedom of expression. We believe this topic is central to the “Internet and Human Rights” sub-theme, and will contribute to ongoing efforts to ensure the Internet is preserved as a free medium to share and access information. 

The workshop will include participants from government and the private sector, who are tasked with formulating and implementing information controls policies, and provide them with an avenue to discuss the impact of these policies with civil society counterparts.

Citizen Lab defines information controls as actions conducted in or through information and communications technologies, which seek to deny (such as web filtering), disrupt (such as denial-of-service attacks), shape (such as throttling), secure (such as through encryption or circumvention) or monitor (such as passive or targeted surveillance) information for political ends. The workshop aims for a multistakeholder discussion concerning the next billion users on issues of online security, privacy, and freedom, thereby allowing them to exchange knowledge and solutions, and facilitating new collaborations. 

Participants will share experiences from Latin America, given that the 2015 IGF is situated in Brazil, while also including varying perspectives from other regions of the world. We intend for the session to be as interactive as possible via the Birds of a Feather format, with the assistance of the co-moderators, to set up the room for group discussion. This will include online participation using IGF’s remote conferencing solutions. 

Session Organizers
A

Amit

Citizen Lab


Friday November 13, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 3

09:00

Main Session on Dynamic Coalitions

Dynamic Coalitions Main Session

 
Length

3 Hours, split into two 90-minute sessions:

-   90 minutes on Day 3 afternoon

-   90 minutes on Day 4 morning


Brief Description/Objective

After 9 years of letting Dynamic Coalitions evolve in the margins of the IGF, the MAG agreed to bring their work into the mainstream and let them present their findings with a view to producing IGF outputs.

This is in line with the recommendations of the CSTD Working Group on IGF improvements which called for more tangible IGF output. The primary objective of this Main Session is to give an opportunity for the DCs to present and showcase their work to the broader community in a formal manner, during a main session at the IGF annual meeting. Many of the DC’s have undertaken and achieved significant work in their respective fields and allowing them to present working outputs for broad community feedback at the IGF will help increase and strengthen IGF outputs for use of other relevant IG fora and bodies. This session will also be a good chance to highlight the work of the DCs in general and hopes to encourage increased participation in the DCs by those attending the IGF in Brazil in person and following remotely.

The structure of the Main Session, split into two days, will reflect the progress of respective DCs’ working outputs, as determined and declared by those same DC’s. The first part of the session on Day 3 will devote speaking slots to those DCs with final, complete outputs, who are actively seeking feedback from the community. Participants will be encouraged to complete rating sheets on the output documents, which will be broken down into the main issues under discussion.

The second part of the Main Session on the morning of Day 4, will give additional DCs who wish to do so the opportunity to introduce themselves, discuss their work, and encourage participation in their group. The rest of the second day will be devoted to discussion and debate on the outputs presented on the first day. The feedback received via rating sheets will provide guidance for the future work of the DCs.

The following DCs will present their work and receive feedback on both days of the Main Session:

- Dynamic Coalition on Accessibility and Disability (DCAD)

- Dynamic Coalition on Core Internet Values (DCCIV)

- Dynamic Coalition on Gender and Internet Governance (DCGIG)

- Dynamic Coalition on Internet Rights & Principles (IRPC)

- Dynamic Coalition on Network Neutrality (DCNN)

- Dynamic Coalition on Platform Responsibility (DCPR)

- Dynamic Coalition on Public Access in Libraries (DCPAL)

- Dynamic Coalition on the Internet of Things (DCIoT) 


The following DCs will introduce their work on the second day of the Main Session:

- Dynamic Coalition on Blockchain Technologies (DCBT)

- Dynamic Coalition on Child Online Safety (DCCOS)

 

Agenda and Format

The session is divided into two broad parts, in order to: 

a) allow the Dynamic Coalitions to present their work, in the first part.

b) allow for discussions and debate, in the second part.


Policy questions

The various DCs have been invited to formulate policy questions.

Among others, the following policy questions have been proposed for consideration:

-   The Internet of Things (IoT) is in early stages, and in many ways new possibilities are developed and discovered beyond our imagination, and we welcome it for its potential to help alleviate specific societal challenges where it can. To foster both innovation and user trust in the Internet of Things, like the Internet, a careful balance should be struck between regulation and innovation. What principles should we embrace to ensure that <1> innovation and beneficial application of IoT can foster and <2> society is comfortable with the way these products and services are set up?

-  Good Practice aims at developing IoT products, ecosystems and services taking ethical considerations into account from the outset, both in the development, deployment and use phases of the life cycle, thus to find a sustainable way ahead using IoT helping to create a free, secure and enabling rights based environment. In what ways can (and should?) we empower the users with regards to the use of data reporting on actions relating to their specific behavior as observed in an IoT enabled environment?

-  How can policy makers, libraries and businesses work together to prioritize providing Internet access through public libraries from an infrastructure standpoint?

-  What actions can IGF participants take to promote the role of libraries in creating informed and engaged populations who can effectively use the internet to access information, obtain government services and participate in social and economic activities?

-  How can we ensure that gender is a cross-cutting theme, not an island or silo, that contributes to strengthening internet governance?

-  How can we strengthen gender diversity - men, women, trans voices -  at all levels of internet governance (participants, moderators and panelists)?

· Chair:

[To be provided by the Host Country]

· Co-Moderators:

Jeanette Hoffman, Rachel Pollack 


Representatives from the DC’s will be presenting the work of their respective groups. Speakers are as follows:

- Dynamic Coalition on Accessibility and Disability (DCAD) : Francesca Cesa Bianchi, Andrea Saks

- Dynamic Coalition on Core Internet Values (DCCIV) : Olivier Crepin-Leblond

- Dynamic Coalition on Gender and Internet Governance (DCGIG) : Bishakha Datta

- Dynamic Coalition on Internet Rights & Principles (IRPC) : Hanane Boujemi, Marianne Franklin

- Dynamic Coalition on Network Neutrality (DCNN) : Luca Belli

- Dynamic Coalition on Platform Responsibility (DCPR) : Nicolo Zingales

- Dynamic Coalition on Public Access in Libraries (DCPAL) : Christina de Castell

- Dynamic Coalition on the Internet of Things (DCIoT) : Maarten Botterman

- Dynamic Coalition on Blockchain Technologies (DCBT) : Primavera De Filippi

- Dynamic Coalition on Child Online Safety (DCCOS) : Marie-Laure Lemineur

 

Remote moderator/Plan for online interaction

The two parts will be linked by feed-back that participants will be invited to give with idea rating sheets. This will allow the DCs to use the feed-back as an introduction to the second part of the session.

More about this rating sheet methodology is available on this website:http://www.idearatingsheets.org/

Moderator: Jeremy Malcolm

 

‘Feeder’ Workshops and/or Connections with Other Sessions

The annual DC meetings will take place ahead of the DC Main Session and are designed to provide input into the DC the main session.

Desired Results:

The outcome of the sessions will determine the level of support the various DCs enjoy from the broader IGF community. One of the session’s objectives is to determine whether there is acceptance on moving towards an IGF output.

 


Friday November 13, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Main Meeting Hall

09:00

WS 79 Zero Rating, Open Internet and Freedom of Expression
Zero rating plans are becoming popular in developing and developed countries. They allow mobile wireless customers to have access to online content without paying data usage charges or having their usage considered within the data usage limits. The greatest benefit from zero rating seems to come from the lower prices for consumers, especially for those unable to afford data plans and from the increasing Internet adoption that these price schemes foster. 
However, there are concerns that zero rating could harm competition in the Internet access market and reduce diversity of expression, due to the preference by the mobile operators for some content providers vs others.
The aim of this workshop is to discuss the impact of zero rating on the open nature of the Internet, on freedom of expression and inclusiveness and to evaluate the overall effect of these practices on social and economic development. 
The workshop will involve regulators from developed and developing countries, international organizations, representatives from academia, technical organizations and private sector. The focus will be on case studies and on the discussion of the specific characteristics of the markets in which these practices are used (two sided markets, modularity, high degree of market innovation) and on the evaluation of the case by case approach to zero rating suggested by some regulators. 
The workshop will discuss also, whether competitive market forces would provide sufficient safeguards and how zero rating, by helping in designing better Internet adoption policies, could make more open and inclusive the Internet governance process. 

Friday November 13, 2015 09:00 - 10:30
Workshop Room 8

09:30

WS 235 Results from the First Deliberative Poll @ IGF
This roundtable, will discuss whether and how a tested tool in democratic process – “the deliberative polling method” - can be applied to complex and highly contested Internet governance challenges. Our goal is to facilitate implementation of Internet governance principles, as described in the NETmundial outcome document, by presenting results from two pilot Deliberative Polls (DP) on Internet governance held just prior to the 2015 IGF. The DP is meant to complement multistakeholder (Internet) governance principles and processes. We will record and analyze the positions of two stratified representative samples of IGF participants before and after they spend several hours reviewing and discussing balanced briefing materials about Internet governance themes. We will report the results of two pilot DPs: face-to-face and online which will be shorter in the duration of deliberation than we plan for future events.

Many of the principles identified at NETmundial pose tradeoffs and challenges when examined through a global policy lens. We plan deliberations on such questions as: What are the roles and responsibilities of international organizations, national governments and the private sector in protecting and respecting human rights in the digital realm? A particular focus will be on Access—how to promote the world’s next billion users.

The panel will draw out concrete policy implications as well as insights about Internet governance process principles, while aggregating the views of a diverse, inclusive, representative sample of IGF participants.

Session Organizers
KG

Kathleen Giles

CDD Manager, Stanford University


Friday November 13, 2015 09:30 - 10:30
Workshop Room 4

09:30

Open Forum - OECD

Organization

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

 

Open Forum Title

Digital Economy for Innovation, Growth and Social Prosperity: towards the 2016 OECD Ministerial

 

Description

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) provides a policy forum where governments work with business, trade-unions, civil society and the Internet technical community to maximise the benefits of information and communication technologies and the Internet as drivers of innovation, productivity, growth, sustainable development and social well-being. 

For over two decades, OECD’s evidence-based work has identified and analysed complex national and cross-border topics related to the Internet economy, informing policy makers and other stakeholders on the development of Internet policies, and developing policy recommendations.

The focus of this year’s forum will be on informing the IGF and consulting with the global stakeholder community on the preparations for the upcoming OECD Ministerial meeting on the Digital Economy in Cancun, Mexico, on 22-23 June 2016. The objective of the Ministerial meeting will be to foster a common understanding on how to maximise the growth, social prosperity and innovation potential of the digital economy, bringing Internet economics, policy and governance at the forefront of high-level political discussions.  

Discussions during this Open Forum will centre on four main themes:  1) The Internet Openness; 2) Building Global connectivity; 3) Trust in the Digital Economy; and 4) Jobs and Skills in the Digital Economy.

The OECD will engage with policy experts, economists, business, the technical community and civil society to discuss the main issues to be addressed under each of these main themes.

This Open Forum will be an opportunity to update the IGF on OECD’s ongoing work in Internet governance and policy and to harness inputs from different stakeholders in view of the preparations for the 2016 Ministerial Meeting.

Further details on the Ministerial including the panel descriptions that support the four themes can be found on the OECD’s website at: http://oe.cd/cancun2016 . You can also follow the Ministerial on Twitter at: @OECDInnovation.

Names of Participants:

  • Tracey Weisler, Senior Advisor for Western Europe, US Federal Communications Commission and Chair of the OECD Working Party on Communication Infrastructures and Services Policy
  • Joseph H. Alhadeff, Chair of BIAC CDEP Committee, Chief Privacy Strategist and Vice President, Global Public Policy, Oracle
  • Marc Rotenberg is President of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC.ORG) and a founding board member and former chair of the Public interest Registry, which manages the .ORG domain
  • Nicolas Seidler, Policy Advisor, Internet Society
  • Anders Hektor, Swedish Government


Name of in-Person Moderator:
Anne Carblanc, Head of Division for Digital Economy Policy, OECD

Name of Remote Moderator: Josie Brocca, Division for Digital Economy, OECD

Agenda:

Anne Carblanc will provide an overview of the Ministerial themes and the issues that form the form the panels that support them.

Participants will then contribute their thoughts, insights and stakeholder perspectives on the issues.

An interactive discussion will follow.

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Lorrayne Porciuncula

Lorrayne Porciuncula

Internet Economist / Policy Analyst, OECD
Lorrayne Porciuncula is an Economist/ Policy Analyst at the Digital Economy and Policy Division (CDEP) of the Directorate Science, Technology and Innovation in the OECD. Lorrayne works on the OECD-IDB Broadband Policy Toolkit for Latin America and the Caribbean that aims to situate policy recommendations to the specific regional and local contexts. Previous to her current position, Lorrayne has worked as an economic analyst in the International... Read More →


Friday November 13, 2015 09:30 - 10:30
Workshop Room 2

11:00

WS 132 Transnational Due Process: A Case Study in MS Cooperation
Multi-stakeholder cooperation is necessary to develop and implement operational solutions to Internet Governance challenges. One such challenge is the tension between the cross-border nature of the Internet and diverse national jurisdictions. As a result, direct requests are increasingly addressed by public authorities and courts in one country to Internet platforms and DNS operators in other jurisdictions for domain seizures, content takedowns and user identification.

Since 2012, the Internet & Jurisdiction Project facilitates a multi-stakeholder dialogue process on this issue. More than 80 entities have collaboratively produced a draft transnational due process framework. Here, the concept of multi-stakeholder cooperation is therefore relevant both as method (the dialogue process) and as outcome (the collaborative framework).

The roundtable will gather participants in the I&J Project from different stakeholder groups to describe:
- the method employed to develop this framework, challenges 
encountered and solutions found
- the potential distribution of roles among the respective stakeholders 
in the operation of the diverse framework components 

The expected benefit is to share concrete experiences around innovative approaches for multi-stakeholder cooperation such as issue-based networks, inter-sessional work methods and transnational policy standards. 

This session will also present the proposed framework to the IGF community to solicit feedback, reach out to new actors and discuss the way forward. The roundtable will be prepared in 2015 by two dedicated meetings in Germany and Brazil, as well as by a number of other sessions with stakeholders around the world organized by the Internet & Jurisdiction Project.

Friday November 13, 2015 11:00 - 12:00
Workshop Room 4

11:00

WS 178 Beyond the tipping point: SID in the global South
Two-thirds of the world’s three billion internet users live in developing countries. Against this background, Safer Internet Day (SID) has become - with support of the European Commission - a landmark online safety campaign, celebrated in more than 100 countries each year. Yet still, regardless of some remarkable success stories in Latin America, Africa and Asia, online safety education remains underexplored ground in the global South.

Within this context, we will explore how the 2016 SID campaign can help to create a safer and better internet for children and young people in countries which may need it most, by developing meaningful multistakeholder participation on a global scale, focusing on children’s rights in a digital world, keeping in mind the specific (and often diverging) nature of internet access and online experiences across socio-economic and regional divides.

More specifically, in this break-out session we will:
a) Give an overview/ of the global reach in the SID 2015 campaign, with best-practice examples from Latin America, Africa and Asia, elaborating on the exchange of knowledge and resources with online safety campaigns and activities in the North.
b) Break out in groups per region, aiming for clusters of action across South-America, Asia and Africa. An analysis of countries already involved in previous SID campaigning will help to establish or strengthen regional partnerships prior to the IGF, while looking at further scaling possibilities through Internet Society Chapters. Each regional group will work towards a concrete action plan, drawing upon the SID 2016 theme, while identifying key multipliers and opportunities for cross-regional collaboration.

Session Organizers
avatar for Hans Martens

Hans Martens

Insafe network coordinator, European Schoolnet / Insafe
Hans Martens (PhD) is European Schoolnet’s Digital Citizenship Programme Manager. He is responsible for the Digital Citizenship strategy of the organisation, managing a team dedicated to a wide variety of public and/or private projects covering aspects ranging from online safety to digital skills. | | Within this context, Hans is leading the Better Internet for Kids project which implements, under the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF), on... Read More →


Friday November 13, 2015 11:00 - 12:00
Workshop Room 2

11:00

WS 242 The Manila Principles on Intermediary Liability
Realizing the freedom of opinion and the freedom of expression online necessarily requires interacting with ‘Internet intermediaries’. Governments around the world undertake speech regulation through the imposition of liability on intermediaries, and often impose related obligations of proactive monitoring and exercising due diligence. Keeping intermediaries from being held culpable through legal provisions that establish that intermediaries cannot be held liable for the content of their users—the concept of “intermediary liability”—thus goes a long way in protecting freedom of expression and other human rights. It is vital to maintain proportionate limits to intermediary liability as we develop policies and laws to defend and promote free expression.

To that end, EFF, CIS (India) and Article 19, building on research analyzing the state of intermediary liability in various countries, and with participation from partner organizations including input from a diverse range of groups and experts worldwide, have facilitated the creation of the Manila Principles on Intermediary Liability. These high level principles arising from an initial planning meeting, and developed through a process of public consultations were finalised and presented at a second meeting as a satellite event of RightsCon 2015. 

This roundtable will look forward, as we endeavour to inculcate the values embedded in these principles into the policies and practices of lawmakers and intermediaries. The roundtable will explain the motivations behind this work and stir discussion on how we can use these principles as a resource for advocacy, research and for strengthening existing collaborations and initiatives around the issues of intermediary liability.

Friday November 13, 2015 11:00 - 12:00
Workshop Room 9

11:00

11:00

11:00

WS 186 A multistakeholder and humanrights approach to cybersecurity

As cybersecurity becomes an increasingly important issue on the international governance agenda, there is a need for an informed debate on the relationship between governance, security, and fundamental rights and freedoms online, involving all stakeholders, and particularly with respect to policy development.    

The purpose of the session is to share perspectives on the need for cybersecurity policy to be rights-respecting by design and to discuss and build on a set of recommendations from the Freedom Online Coalition (FOC) WG 1 on “Internet free and secure” designed to bring human rights into cybersecurity policy development and decision-making.

The workshop comprises a panel segment, interactive breakouts and a closing segment.

On the panel:

Matthew Shears, Center for Democracy & Technology, FOC WG1 (moderator)

Uri Rosenthal, Special Envoy for International Cyber Policies, Government of the Netherlands (welcome video)

Eileen Donahoe, Human Rights Watch, FOC WG 1

Michael Walma, Cyber Coordinator, Department of Fooreign Affairs, Government of Canada

Audrey Plonk,  Director, Global Cybersecurity and Internet Governance Policy, Intel Corporation

Mishi Choudhary, Legal Director, Software Freedom Law Center

The breakouts will be fully interactive, involving the workshop participants in small focussed groups that will discuss the need for cybersecurity to be rights respecting by design and review and build on the recomendaitons from the Freedom Online Coalition Working Group.  Those attending the workshop are encouraged to review the draft recommendations in workshop documentation.  FOC WG 1 members will be moderating each breakout.

For further information on the work of the Freedom Online Coalition Working Group 1, including Mapping Cybersecurity – A visual overview of relevant global spaces in 2015 and the WG's blog series on cybersecurity, please go to:

https://www.freedomonlinecoalition.com/how-we-work/working-groups/working-group-1/

Workshop rapporteur: Stefania Milan, Tilburg University, the Netherlands, Director of the Data J Lab, FOC WG 1
Remote participation: Aditi Gupta, Global Partners Digital

Session Organizers
avatar for Matthew Shears

Matthew Shears

Global Internet Policy & Human Rights, CDT
Mr. Matthew Shears is Director for Global Internet Policy and Human Rights activities at the Center for Democracy and Technology’s (CDT). He has extensive experience in Internet and telecommunications policy and governance in the non-profit, public and private sectors. He was Internet Society’s Public Policy Director, organization during the Tunis phase of the WSIS, at ITU Telecom World and at the Internet Governance Forum. From... Read More →



Friday November 13, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 5

11:00

WS 54 The Destabilization of Internet Governance
This panel will examine the implications of government and private actors placing pressure on systems of Internet administration and challenging enduring principles of universality, efficiency, openness, and permissionless innovation. Systems of Internet design and administration are now recognized as sites of economic and political power and being co-opted for purposes far beyond their original functions. For example, the Domain Name System is being used for a number of purposes completely outside of its original design goal, including intellectual property rights enforcement through DNS takedowns, and censorship, through various blocking and redirection techniques. There is an accompanying rise in disputes over territorial and trademark Internet names and nation-specific Internet policies such as data localization, the Right to be Forgotten, and alternative naming systems. More broadly, the long arc of geopolitical tension over the role of the US, the ITU, ICANN, developing countries, and multinational companies in Internet governance is rising. Much attention is already focused on the implications of these shifts for the economy and for civil liberties but what about the technology itself? This panel analyzes the possible effects of top-down Internet policies on Internet architecture and examines the type of technical framework for Internet governance that could both sustain an open and stable Internet architecture but also address legitimate concerns of policymakers. The expected outcome of this panel is to encourage dialogue between the technical community and policy makers.

Session Organizers
avatar for Lorrayne Porciuncula

Lorrayne Porciuncula

Internet Economist / Policy Analyst, OECD
Lorrayne Porciuncula is an Economist/ Policy Analyst at the Digital Economy and Policy Division (CDEP) of the Directorate Science, Technology and Innovation in the OECD. Lorrayne works on the OECD-IDB Broadband Policy Toolkit for Latin America and the Caribbean that aims to situate policy recommendations to the specific regional and local contexts. Previous to her current position, Lorrayne has worked as an economic analyst in the International... Read More →


Friday November 13, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 8

11:00

WS 119 Democracy 3.0: Representation & the Multistakeholder Model
The Internet has changed the way we see and consider democracy. Yet, with all the early enthusiasm of the Internet’s democratization capabilities, many different indices including from Freedom House, are indicating a trend of receding democracy, even to the emergence of “democratators”, mass surveillance and online opinion wars. Where the Internet has helped to progress democratic movements that have achieved revolutionary results, some are regressing equally spectacularly.

What we think of as democracy’s standard constitutional structure: representative democracy (Democracy 2.0) is challenged by Internet’s ability to facilitate participative democracy (Democracy 1.0) to a point where constituency and representation must be rethought. Disruptive ideas such as Deliberative Democracy and Liquid Democracy are ushering new possibilities of democratic deployment to harness the growing interest of the increasingly informed electorate to play a direct role in public governance.

What about the Multistakeholder model of Internet governance? What can it contribute to our larger movement in democracy beyond the representative model? On the other hand, can Internet governance forums provide experimental grounds for these newer ideas of democracy? Imagine how Liquid democracy might work for ICANN? Is the IETF NomCom already a form of deliberative democracy?

This session aims to delve into the complex question of whether what we champion as the multistakeholder model “Can in fact be considered democratic?”, and if so “how can we make it more democratic?” And also on the flip side, what, if any, can the Internet governance experience inform the larger discourse on democracy’s development?

Friday November 13, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 1

11:00

WS 136 Through the Looking Glass: enhanced cooperation in LAC
This session aims at examining some of the most salient processes in the region of the last years. The region has seen an increase in awareness of Internet governance issues within all stakeholders: Netmundial and the involvement of the CGI and ICANN; the eLAC process which has consolidated a steady participation of governments; the development of improved Internet infrastructure for the region; the consolidation of the LACIGF as a forum for participation and the steady development of national Internet governance initiatives in many countries are all case in points. A key distinctive trait is that these initiatives have a multistakeholder component and that they have all some degree of cooperation from different actors.
The session doesn’t aim to provide a celebratory view on these processes, nor present them just to inform them to a global audience. Rather, the objective is to frame the issues and extract, with the expertise of two moderators (one from outside the region): What are the distinctive traits of this cooperation and how to promote it within the current institutional environment?; What is particular about the region and what could be considered as part of a growing international trend?; What is the value for other regions with this experience and what could be incorporated from others into the existing processes? Considering other regional trends, is there a need to develop new mechanisms? This proposal is presented as part of an overall effort of the Internet technical organizations comprised in the Casa de Internet of LAC.

Session Organizers
avatar for Carolina Aguerre

Carolina Aguerre

CETYS, UdeSA
I'm a researcher at the Center for Technology and Society (CETYS) and Professor at the Universidad de San Andres in Buenos Aires. I was a MAG member from 2012 to 2014 and have been involved in Internet governance issues since the preparations for WSIS in 2004. I have held policy related positions in the past as G. M at LACTLD. I hold a PhD in Social Sciences from the University of Buenos Aires.


Friday November 13, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room_10

11:00

WS 191 Engaging youth in a multistakeholderism practicum
As part of efforts to enhance the awareness of young people regarding internet governance processes, the coordinators of the Youth Coalition on Internet Governance will be launching an Internet Governance practicum at the IGF 2015.
The practicum aims to provide youth with practical experience and will especially be beneficial to young people with little to no knowledge on Internet Governance matters. 

This will be an attempt to come up with a youth declaration on what are their most important concerns in Internet Governance. This will build on the 2014 efforts to come up with a Youth Manifesto on Internet Governance: 
http://www.youthmanifesto.eu/youth-manifesto-proposals#c2440564

Inclusive and participatory processes for the development of Internet-related policies are essential for a multistakeholder governance approach. Defining modalities acceptable by all stakeholders is one of the main challenges in fullfilling the Tunis Agenda. Therefore, the focus of the workshop is to illustrate in a concrete manner the different processes used in various groups to develop positions, recommendations, and other forms of output, in particular the three early stages of such processes :

Agenda-setting:how is discussion conducted on an initial topic suggestion ? What iterations are used to find a formulation of the issue that is satisfactory for all participants ? How is the decision to launch a more formal process taken ?
Issue-scoping and framing: how are the different dimensions of the issue and relevant stakeholders identified ? Are initial issues papers or background documents developed?

Friday November 13, 2015 11:00 - 12:30
Workshop Room 7

11:00

Human Rights on the Internet

The IGF has been a critical platform to facilitate dialogue on human rights and their interlinkages with Internet policy and governance, which has also informed discussions in other policy bodies such as the Human Rights Council. Human rights issues have also been increasingly prominent at the IGF, with a large proportion of workshops speaking to their different dimensions.


This main session on human rights intends to:

  1. Surface key questions and facilitate broader discussions on the issue of human rights and the Internet;
  2. Surface the linkage between the IGF 2015 thematic area of access with human rights.


The session will be organised as a roundtable, and will focus on three areas of discussion, namely:

  • human rights, access and development;
  • freedom of expression, right to assembly and privacy; and
  • emerging issues.


The roundtable aims to create a space to discuss key issues and questions that emerge from workshop sessions focused on human rights as well as new questions and topics raised in this public consultation. The main areas are organised based on workshop submissions under the thematic area of human rights. The global Internet community has helped to shape this session by suggesting policy questions for each of the areas in the one (1) month prior to the IGF (see the questions attached below).

Discussants from different stakeholder groups will provide substantive inputs to some of the questions (attached below), which will then be opened up to participants for broader conversation. Moderators will introduce the overall framing for the session, and actively engage discussants and participants in the conversation.


Moderators:

Anriette Esterhuysen, Association for Progressive Communications, South Africa
Juan Carlos, Derechos Digitales, Chile
Host country chair: Thiago Tavares

Discussants:

Opening input: Prof Joseph Canatacci, UN Special Rapporteur on Right to Privacy in Digital Age
Rohan Samarajiva, LirneAsia, Sri Lanka (Academia/Civil Society, Invited)
Niels ten Oever, Working Party on ICANN and Human Rights, IRTF
Research Group on Human Rights Protocol Considerations & Article 19,
Netherlands (Civil Society)
Bishakha Datta, Point of View, India (Civil Society)
Ebele Okobi, Facebook, Head of Public Policy Africa, Nigeria/London (Private Sector)
Kathy Brown, ISOC, US (Technical Community)
Frane Maroevic, Director, Office of the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media
Yolanda Martínez, Head of the Digital Government Unit, Ministry of Public Administration of Mexico (Government)
Guilherme Varella, Department of Cultural Policy of the Ministry of Culture, Brazil (Government, Invited)
Olga Cavalli, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Argentina (Government)

Closing/Synthesis: Frank LaRue, Executive Director of Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Europe, Guatemala/Italy

Open to the floor as well as workshop session organisers, including representatives from Dynamic Coalitions.

Session Organizers
AV

Anri van der Spuy

Internet Governance Forum



Friday November 13, 2015 11:00 - 13:00
Main Meeting Hall

12:00

WS 154 Connect 2020 Agenda Implementation: Challenges/opportunities
Session Description

The Connect 2020 Agenda is a new global framework for collaboration to build an inclusive information society by 2020. The agenda, agreed by the 193 Member States of ITU in the 2014 Plenipotentiary Conference, includes specific targets to be achieve by 2020 in the areas of telecommunications/ICT growth, inclusiveness, sustainability, and innovation and partnership. 

The vision, goals and targets, grouped under the Connect 2020 Agenda, have been elaborated in a process that lasted for more than a year and ensured wide participation of all stakeholders. ITU has engaged in an innovative public consultation process to gather views, managing to achieve active contribution of key entities that, in addition to Member States, included vendors of telecommunication/ICT equipment, telecom operators and other private sector organizations, international, regional and national associations and organizations, as well as civil society.

This session will present the Connect 2020 agenda to the participants of IGF, and provide an opportunity to discuss the challenges and opportunities related to the implementation of this agenda. The panel will identify areas where increased efforts will be required to ensure the targets will be met. It will provide an overview of existing mechanisms at the national and international levels for measuring ICT progress.

Connect 2020 Agenda:
http://www.itu.int/connect2020

Moderator

Mr. Tomas Lamanauskas, Head of Corporate Strategy Division, International Telecommunication Union (ITU)

Speakers

  • Mr. Malcolm Johnson, Deputy Secretary-General, International Telecommunication Union (ITU)
  • Mr. Tom Lindstrom, Director, Government and Industry Relations, Ericsson
  • Mr. Andy O'Connell, Manager, Global Policy Development, Facebook
  • Ms. Piret Urb, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Estonia
  • Mr. Dhanaraj Thakur, Research Manager, Alliance for Affordable Internet
  • Ms. Dominique Lazanski, Public Policy Director, GSMA
  • Dr. Enrico Calandro, Senior Research Fellow at Research ICT Africa
  • Ms. Lorrayne Porciuncula, Economist/Policy Analyst Telecommunication Policy and Regulation, OECD



Session Organizers
avatar for Despoina Sareidaki

Despoina Sareidaki

International Telecommunication Union (ITU)
ICT Policy Analyst specializing in the area of Cybersecurity and Internet Policy


Friday November 13, 2015 12:00 - 13:00
Workshop Room 4

12:00

12:00

Open Forum - Internet Number Community
Background:

This will not be an Open Forum about the RIRs as organizations. This will be an Open Forum which will talk about the Numbering Community: how the number community has developed policies for the management and distribution of IP resources; how it has lead the deployment of technologies that use such resources, i.e. IPv6; and it will also introduce some of their efforts in producing a proposal for the transition of the stewardship of the IANA numbers function. If time permits, it will also talk about community participation in capacity building efforts that RIRs have.

Proposal:

The Numbering Community has been actively working in bottom-up processes even before ICANN and WSIS existed. It has worked well to coordinate IP addressing resources, at the regional and at the global levels. This has been a key element for the Internet to work well over many years. This Open Forum will talk about this story of community involvement in the Internet Numbers space.

Objective:

To explain the Numbers Community to a wider audience. To welcome new participants to this community. To encourage participation in Policy Development Processes.
More info here: http://www.intgovforum.org/cms/openforums-2015/details/34/501/open-forums-apnic-the-regional-internet-registry-for-asia-pacific —

Outline:

This is a 60 minutes session. This session will have Axel Pawlik, current NRO Chair, as moderator.

Aaron Hughes, CEO of 6connect, from North America, will talk about community-led policy development processes, at the regional and global levels.

Then Nicolás Antoniello, Advisor to a Ministry in Uruguay, from Latin America, will talk about the policy forum of Lacnic and examples of policies in this region.

Saskia Kleine-Tebbe, from the Federal Ministry of the Interior in Germany, will talk about how governments are also part of the Numbers Community and examples of their participation in the RIPE-NCC policy process.

Mike Blanche, from Google, will talk about the multistakeholder nature of the RIPE community and organisation.

Lito Ibarra, Member of the Board of ICANN and Lacnic, from El Salvador, will talk about the role of the Internet Number Community in Internet Governance processes, such as the IANA transition.

Then Izumi Okutani, from JPNIC in Japan, will talk about the work to develop the Numbers Proposal for the IANA stewardship transition.

Finally Janvier Ngnoulaye, Lecturer in  theICT- University of Yaounde from Cameroon and former Afrinic Board Member will speak about community involvement in Internet development and how IP addresses are progressing in Africa.

There will be time for active participation from the audience.



Session Organizers
avatar for Pablo Hinojosa

Pablo Hinojosa

Strategic Engagement Director, APNIC


Friday November 13, 2015 12:00 - 13:00
Workshop Room 6

12:00

Open Forum - UNESCO
UNESCO takes the Forum to launch its comprehensive Internet Study titled “Keystones to Foster Inclusive Knowledge Societies: Access to information and knowledge, Freedom of Expression, Privacy and Ethics on a Global Internet”, as mandated by its 37th General Conference Resolution 52 (2013). This major global study explores global perspectives on the new and emerging trends that are shaping the Internet space. The framework of investigating the four key fields for this report is that of Internet Universality. Based on all this, the draft report identifies a series of options for UNESCO. The study and its options follow an almost year-long process, which involved, inter alia, several rounds of consultation with Member States and other actors, as well as almost 200 major responses to an online questionnaire. 

UNESCO organized from 3 - 4 March 2015, an international multi-stakeholder conference of some 400 participants to discuss the first draft of the Comprehensive Study. With overwhelming agreement, an Outcome Document was adopted by UNESCO CONNECTing the Dots Conference and underscored the significance of the Internet for human progress and its role in fostering inclusive Knowledge Societies.

Proposed in the Document is affirmation of the human rights principles that underpin UNESCO’s approach to Internet-related issues, and support for the Internet Universality principles that promote a Human Rights-based, Open Internet, which is Accessible to all and characterized by Multi-stakeholder participation (R.O.A.M). The Study and Outcome Document are presented to UNESCO’s Member States through the Executive Board Meeting and General Conference within 2015.

All these documents are available at:
www.unesco.org/new/internetstudy
http://www.unesco.org/new/en/netconference2015

Friday November 13, 2015 12:00 - 13:00
Workshop Room 3

14:00

WS 134 Organising an Internet Social Forum - Occupy the Internet
The Internet has become an integral and essential part of our daily lives. It is determining our access to knowledge, how we communicate with each other and increasingly, new arteries of commerce. At the same time, we are alarmed to see how both our private and public spaces are being co-opted and controlled for private gain; how private corporations are carving the public Internet into walled spaces; how our personal data is being manipulated and proprietised; how a global surveillance society is emerging, with little or no privacy; how information on the Internet is being arbitrarily censored, and people's right to communicate curtailed; and, how the Internet is being militarised. Meanwhile, decision-making on public policy matters relating to the Internet remains dangerously removed from the mechanisms of democratic governance. The workshop will discuss the need and the modalities of a global Internet Social Forum, to explore the Internet we want and how to build it, and to begin a process to develop a 'People's Internet Manifesto'.
Internet Social Forum aims to create a global space precisely to take up these issues, where we will discuss the Internet we want, share information on our endeavours and struggles for democracy, human rights and social justice in relation to the Internet, and develop collective action agendas. The Internet Social Forum (ISF) takes its inspiration from the World Social Forum (WSF) process and its visionary call that “Another world is possible”—we are suggesting that "Another (People's) Internet is possible”. See www.InternetSocialForum.net .

Session Organizers
avatar for parminder

parminder

Executive Director, IT for Change
I work with IT for Change (www.ITforChange.net ) which is an NGO based in India. It works on the intersection of ICTs and social change, with the cornerstone values of equity, social justice and democracy. Some key areas of our work are, education, gender, governance, community informatics and Internet governance.


Friday November 13, 2015 14:00 - 14:30
Workshop Room 2

14:00

WS 244 Digital Bootcamp: Play. Collaborate. Change the World.

Enhancing Multistakeholder Cooperation

Description

Tech solutions. Internet governance challenges. There seems to be a bottomless well of both and yet successful examples the former addressing the latter are comparatively sparse - especially in developing nations like the Philippines that need these solutions the most.

In the course of running Dakila’s Digibak program, we have identified a concerning gap, one between those developing the solutions and those facing the problems.

Whether it’s gaps (or chasms) in culture, capacity, understanding, or access, the Digibak Boot camp is aimed to bridge them, bringing different stakeholders such as tech experts, human rights workers, humanitarians, development workers, government agencies together to collaborate on technology, tools and strategies that are practical and practicable.

The Digibak Bootcamp gamifies the real-world challenges and processes such as SECURITY and PRIVACY faced by CSO's, government, companies, and other Internet stakeholders.

The game emphasizes on collaboration among stakeholders to identify the roadblocks and challenges that they face and the resources and tools that they need or that they already have. The game aims for stakeholders to find out how to collaborate with each other to solve problems they face in their communities, both online and offline.

The game also wishes to address problems faced by civil society organizations, especially human rights defenders, in using online tools to campaign for or against specific human rights issues.


Friday November 13, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 6

14:00

WS 80 Bottom-up Meets Top-down: When Governance Systems Intersect

Enhancing Multistakeholder Cooperation

Description

Internet governance today encompasses policy discussions and decisions whose effects can be far-reaching. As more and more businesses and industries come to rely on Internet connectivity and infrastructure, they are also increasingly impacted by the outcomes of Internet governance processes. Many of these industries, including telecommunications, energy, trade and many others, have their own well-established global governance processes, often based in intergovernmental institutions, and Internet governance processes are intersecting with these older governance models, tackling common issues via very different policy-making approaches.

What does this mean for the bottom-up, multistakeholder model of Internet governance? And for the older governance structures now intersecting with Internet-related issues? And what does it mean for stakeholders in those industries who must now navigate several governance processes? These questions are critical as we consider whether a multistakeholder approach to Internet governance is sustainable and can facilitate the broader global growth and development of the Internet.

This workshop will consider these questions via a Roundtable format with participants from bottom-up Internet structures (the IETF, the RIRs), international organisations (the International Telecommunication Union) and the private sector (Telefonica and the GSM Association). Outcomes will include positive examples for engagement across governance systems and identifying specific areas of friction or misunderstanding, and how those might be addressed.


Session Organizers
avatar for Chris Buckridge

Chris Buckridge

External Relations Manager, RIPE NCC
I'm External Relations Manager with the RIPE NCC, which is the Regional Internet Registry (IP addresses etc.) for Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia.


Friday November 13, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 4

14:00

WS 58 OERs: Can they bridge the digital divide gap?
Of all the civil rights for which the world has struggled and fought for 5,000 years, the right to learn is undoubtedly the most fundamental. 
Today there is a fast increase in numbers of massive open online courses, open educational resources (OER) on the Internet and the process is getting even faster with emerging technologies: mobile, virtual and augmented reality etc. OERs have gained increased attention for their potential and promise to obviate demographic, economic, and geographic educational boundaries and to promote life-long learning and personalised learning. The initiatives of Education For All (EFA) and the Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s) have helped put the debate surrounding basic education firmly in the educational, developmental and economic spotlight. With the continued widening digital divide gap in the global South (Sub Sahara Africa), experts have argued that OERs could be the answer to digital inclusion and diversity and online education services now are major approaches for empowerment people. Access to such a large and unregulated body of information, as exists on the Internet, suggests a need for quality control and critical evaluation of related educational internet resources as the information there might be irrelevant and of low-quality. Thus there should be basic principles of quality control of education services, and especially educational content discussed during the IGF with representatives of different stakeholders groups.

Friday November 13, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 5

14:00

WS 172 Cybersecurity, human rights and Internet business triangle
The main topic (and challenge) of the session will be to discuss an interplay among cybersecurity, human rights and business. Typically, these issues are addressed in policy silos. 
Instead this session considers these three themes jointly linked and which can be visualized as three points of a triangular relationship where the individual internet users form a central link between each aspect. 
Global cybersecurity – built around the important role of individual Internet users – has human rights as one of its cornerstones. The recognition of this link has already started emerging in policy documents. The Swiss cybersecurity strategy includes reference to links between cybersecurity and human rights. The EU’s cybersecurity strategy considers protection of human rights as one of its five strategy pillars. 
The first two corners of triangle: cybersecurity and human rights are closely linked to the third one: business and economic well-being. Cybersecurity is vital for the growth of e-commerce. The way human rights issues such as online privacy addressed directly affect business model of the Internet industry. 
The discussion, based on examples from the Geneva Internet Platform experiences in Geneva and the MAPPING project, should provide a valuable contribution to the international community by discussing a functional and balanced interplay among cybersecurity, human rights and Internet business. 

Friday November 13, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 9

14:00

WS 97 How to Bridge the Global Internet Economy Divide?
The eight United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) included the need to develop a global partnership for development as one of its goals. To achieve that goal, there was emphasis on the need to make available the benefits of new technologies, especially information and communications so as to help achieve sustainable economic development. Our point of departure is that without having a strong Internet-centric economy, achieving that goal will be difficult because of the increasing reliance on the Internet to provide many global and national services.
While developed countries use Internet in positive ways to expand and speed up economic development, developing countries remained well behind in implementing policies to develop their Internet economy. 
The workshop tries to understand what challenges developing countries face when trying to implement projects, companies and institutions that rely on the Internet to leverage and improve services. There are numerous opportunities for developing states in particular as they slowly and surely establish their Internet service sectors. 
There are certain infrastructure, economic, and legal aspects that may have hindered progress in this area. What are they and how could they be addressed?
We believe that the outcomes of the workshop will have a direct positive contribution to meeting the eighth goal of the MDGs.
The workshop targets fall under IGF 2015 subtheme of “Internet Economy”. In line with the MAG evaluation and comments, we shall restrict the workshop scope to identify issue and possible solution to internet economy divide in low and Middle income economies.

Friday November 13, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 1

14:00

WS 10 FOSS & a Free, Open Internet: Synergies for Development
As ICTs permeate lives of people around the world, code is fast emerging as an instrument that can change lives. In many parts of the world, the 4Rs of primary education are Reading, wRiting, aRithmetic and pRogramming, indicative of the role that ICTs will play in the future.

Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) is, inter alia, a mechanism whereby code, and consequently the ability to code, is being democratized. In contrast with centralized proprietary models, FOSS allows decentralized creation, distribution and maintenance of code. Such democratization enables grassroots level application of code to solve local problems, leading to more empowered communities. Free flow of code is therefore important to ensure that communities to stay 'plugged in' and current. Code also enables communities to side-step practices such as surveillance, censorship.

A Free, Open, Unfragmented Internet is of critical importance to FOSS--without a free Internet, the FOSS-based peer-production methodologies for code would be infeasible. Interestingly, the Internet also needs the innovations of FOSS to remain free & open, thus forming a positive mutual dependency.

Both FOSS and the Internet are at risk from forces that are seeking increasing control over content and fragmentation, challenging its openness. This would be inimical to the rights of present & future generations to use technology to improve their lives.

The Round-table seeks to highlight perspectives from the participants about the future co-developemnt of FOSS and a free, open Internet; the threats that are emerging; and ways for communities to surmount these.

Friday November 13, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 7

14:00

WS 223 Community Networks: a Revolutionary Paradigm
This session will analyse the challenges and opportunities that community networks present regarding Internet access, social organisation and non-discriminatory internetworking. Panellists and audience will engage into a participatory debate focusing on:

1. Opportunities
Community networks rely on the use peer-to-peer technology and independent infrastructure operating autonomously from pre-existing infrastructure that may be centralised and under the control of commercial providers and governments. Such decentralised networks have the potential to provide Internet access to remote areas; to foster new forms of social structures; to offer a safe-haven for activists; to keep communication channels open at times of crisis; and to offer low-income communities the ability of building high-volume and low cost internet connectivity. 

2. Challenges
The removal of central hubs controlling the infrastructure of communication eliminates the possibility for authorities to rely on private actors (large online operators, ISPs) to monitor and police online communications. Mesh networks foster user anonymity making it increasingly difficult to attack or track individual infringers, thus, becoming attractive for illegal activities. 

3. Solutions
This workshop will aim at identifying best practices for community network management and distilling core policy elements aimed at fostering the development of community networks. This roundtable will also act as a bird of a feather meeting for all stakeholders interested in further analysing the benefits of community networks.

Friday November 13, 2015 14:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 8

14:00

The NETmundial Statement and the Evolution of the Internet Governance Ecosystem

The NETmundial Multistakeholder Statement covers a wide range of Internet Governance issues that are of great interest to IGF. In particular, the Statement highlighted the need for a strengthened IGF in its mandate of serving as the focal point for the discussion of many issues that are not being adequately addressed by existing organizations and fora. This main session aims at taking stock of how well those issues are being advanced by the community 18 months after São Paulo.

The session will have two main objectives:

a)  To take stock of the evolution of the Internet Governance ecosystem with regard to the principles contained in the NETmundial Multistakeholder Statement and its roadmap.

b) To assess the current and future impact of the NETmundial Statement on Internet Governance processes.

The main part of the session will be organized in five consecutive blocks. The three initial blocks will correspond to the discussion of the following three policy questions:

a) How is the Internet Governance community advancing towards the NETmundial proposal of strengthening IGF to better serve as a platform for discussing longstanding and emerging issues that are not being fully addressed by the current IG ecosystem with a view to contributing to the identification of possible ways to address them – or to better help provide information where those issues are being addressed?
Are organizations, processes and fora that form the IG ecosystem working according to the principles of Internet Governance as proposed in the NETmundial Statement? How do their operating principles align to these principles? Are there efforts to improve alignment where needed?

How are the items in the NETmundial roadmap being covered by the current Internet Governance ecosystem? Are those items being covered by processes that align to the NETmundial principles? What else should be done / initiated by the community in this regard?

In each of these blocks, a main speaker will have 10 minutes to address concrete examples that show the advancement of the Internet Governance ecosystem, as appropriate for each of the policy questions. A debater will have 5 minutes immediately after the main speaker to discuss his/her contribution. The fourth block will bring three debaters that will address all three policy questions together. The fifth and final block will be entirely reserved for the interaction with the audience, from a global perspective regarding all policy questions.

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Friday, November 13 • 14:00 – 16:00
Engage via Twitter: #NETmundial_IGF
Remote participation: http://bit.ly/1Qg9jr7

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Subscribe to the Mailing List of this Main Session!


Session Organizers
avatar for Ana Cristina Amoroso Neves

Ana Cristina Amoroso Neves

Director - Department for Information Society and Knowledge, Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, I.P. (FCT), Ministry of Science, Technology and Higher Education
http://linkedin.com/in/anacristinaamorosoneves
avatar for Flavio Rech Wagner

Flavio Rech Wagner

Board member, CGI.br
Professor for Computer Science and Engineering at the UFRGS (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul), in Porto Alegre, Brazil.



Friday November 13, 2015 14:00 - 16:00
Main Meeting Hall

14:30

Open Forum - European Comission/Global Internet Policy Observatory (GIPO)

Progress of GIPO tool - Open debate on usability and inclusivity of the platform
Workshop Room 2

AGENDA:

1. Introduction to GIPO by Cristina Monti, European Commission

2.  Presentation of beta version of GIPO tool by Luis Meijueiro, Fundacion CTIC

3.  GIPO as an information "engine" for other initiatives by Stefaan Verhulst, The GovLab

4. Towards a "Federation roadmap" for online Observatories by Kasia Jakimowicz, Open Evidence

5. Q&A / Open Discussion

The objective of the Global Internet Policy Observatory (GIPO) is to provide technical tools that will make information on Internet policy and governance widely accessible for interested communities (countries, NGOs and interest groups, which may have been marginalised in Internet debates and decisions).

The main idea behind GIPO is to apply advanced technologies (data mining, semantic analysis and data visualisation) to data that is already available in order to overcome the problem of information overload and its fragmentation. Information comes from different countries in different languages, from different sources and in different forms. In this context the issue of multilingualism (inclusivity) as well as the form of presenting the information and the way users interact with it (usability) is crucial.  It is not only linked with the user interface, but also with the categorization and taxonomies, the semantic services, etc.

During this forum the GIPO team will invite Internet Governance stakeholders and technological experts involved in the development of similar platforms to open debate about:

  1. A collaborative approach to GIPO where the community can help in translating and shaping any cultural or even technical issue (accessibility)
  2. A design / configuration of the user dashboard - user case scenarios (usability)
  3. An interoperability of the platform with other initiatives - first results of federation roadmap will be presented.

​The demo of the GIPO tool will be presented and future areas for collaboration will be identified.

If you think your project / initiative can cooperate with GIPO either as a user or an info provider, please fill-in the survey: http://bit.ly/1WMYtJX

 


Session Organizers
avatar for Kasia Jakimowicz

Kasia Jakimowicz

European Affairs Manager, Open Evidence
Responsible for strategic stakeholders´engagement for Global Internet Policy Observatory and GIPO federation roadmap. | | For federation roadmap - if you think your project / initiative can cooperate with GIPO either as a user or an info provider, please fill-in the survey form to add your organisation to the list: | http://bit.ly/1WMYtJX


Friday November 13, 2015 14:30 - 15:30
Workshop Room 2

15:00

Dynamic Coalition on Blockchain Technologies

First Meeting of the Dynamic Coalition on Blockchain Technology (COALA)


13 November, 15:00-15:30

 

The rapid emergence of blockchain technologies, often compared to the rise of the early Internet, presents revolutionary opportunities and challenges to the future of modern society as we face the 21st century world of ubiquitous connectivity, decentralized networks and interconnected devices. Many legislators around the globe are currently scrutinising the opportunity to elaborate and adopt legislation on blockchain technologies such as Bitcoin, most notably.


The first meeting of the Dynamic Coalition on Blockchain Technology will foster a reflection on the emerging challenges raised and faced by these new technologies, so as to better under the current regulatory debate and ideally elaborate a concrete set of guidelines for regulators and policy-makers.


After a short presentation of the newly created Dynamic Coalation on Blockchain Technology, and a description of the work which has already been done under the framework of the global Coalition on Automated Legal Applications (http://coala.global), Primavera De Filippi (Harvard / CNRS) and Constance Choi (SevenAdvisory) will moderate an interactive discussion with the audience, with a view to identify what are the most pressing issues and regulatory concerns that should be tacked in the short-term. Everyone will be given an opportunity to speak and contribute to the discussion, and all intervention will be taken into account in order to elaborate the roadmap for the Dynamic Coalition.

 

Meeting Agenda

15:00 - 15:05    Introduction to COALA and the Dynamic Coalition on Blockchain Technology

15:05 - 15:20    Open and interactive discussion with the audience

15:20 - 15:30    Elaboration of the roadmap for the Dynamic Coalition


Session Organizers
avatar for Primavera de Filippi

Primavera de Filippi

CNRS / Harvard / Backfeed
Primavera De Filippi is a postdoctoral researcher at the CERSA / CNRS / Université Paris II (Panthéon-Assas). She is currently a research fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School, where she is investigating the legal challenges of “governance-by-design” in online distibuted architectures, such as Bitcoin, Ethereum etc. She is also a co-founder and Chief Alchemist at Backfeed, a... Read More →


Friday November 13, 2015 15:00 - 15:30
Workshop Room 3

16:30

17:00